Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion

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LEAD (Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion) caseworker Tim Candela, right, attends a LEAD meeting at the SPD West Precinct

From: CapitolHillSeattle

In recent weeks, East Precinct officers have been trained to participate in the Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion program. LEAD now joins the already functioning Multi-Disciplinary Team program on Capitol Hill in giving law enforcement new options and resources for dealing with addiction. Officials are looking at ways the two programs can work together.

According to Public Defender Association director Lisa Daugaard, all East Precinct police officers will be trained to participate in LEAD by the end of the month. Until now only West Precinct officers have been able to recommend people for LEAD participation. There was initial talk of only expanding the program to Capitol Hill, but “Capitol Hill community leaders actually pushed for inclusion of the rest of the precinct on racial justice grounds,” because, according to Daugaard, community leaders felt that parts of the East Precinct with a higher percentage of minorities than Capitol Hill should also benefit from the program. Daugaard said she anticipates that once East Precinct officers have been trained, “there will probably be significantly more referrals” for the LEAD program.

Mayor Ed Murray announced the planned expansion of the MDT and LEAD programs to Capitol Hill in fall 2015. MDT was expanded to Capitol Hill in January, and Metropolitan Improvement District vice president Dave Willard said so far results have been “pretty encouraging.” Outreach workers for MDT joined East Precinct officers on patrols, and now those officers are being trained to do some outreach of their own.

Visit the LEAD website

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VOCAL Washington on Seattle Capitol Hill This Week

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From: CapitolHillSeattle

Meanwhile, another potential public health intervention for chronic drug users is making the rounds in Seattle. A mock safe consumption site for drug users set up by VOCAL Washington is making stops on Capitol Hill this week. The site targets users who inject and provides low-threshold access to a supervised space to consume pre-obtained illicit drugs, clean equipment, emergency care in the case of overdoses, and referrals to healthcare and drug treatment services if desired by the user.

On Monday, the site was set up in Cal Anderson from noon to 7 PM. Advocate Ashley Hempelmann said safe consumption sites cut down on transferrals of drug users to hospitals and public disorder. There are no cities in the U.S. currently using safe consumption sites.

VOCAL’s Patricia Sully said the pop-up site in the middle a city park is a way to make it easy for lots of people to learn more about how the resource would work — not demonstrate an actual working consumption site.

Visit VOCAL Washington website

Saturday July 16 – East Precinct Community Picnic

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You are invited to a community picnic with the Seattle Police and the neighborhood surrounding Powell Barnett Park next Saturday, July 16, 1pm to 4pm, at Powell Barnett Park, MLK JR Way, between E Yesler and E Cherry. This is a community policing/fun activity — music, hot dogs and ice cream, entertainment and door prizes.

East Precinct Community Picnic

WHEN: Saturday, July 16, 2016 – 1:00 pm @ 1:00 PM – 4:00 PM
WHERE: Powell Barnett Park
Powell Barnett Park
352 Martin Luther King Jr Way, Seattle, WA 98122

See Event Website

Saturday July 23 – National Police Activities League presents a Free Jr. NBA Camp Seattle

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National Police Activities League presents a Free Jr. NBA Camp Seattle – 10-16 Years old

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ATTENTION: Boys & Girls Basketball Players
Ages 10-16

Join Former NBA Greats for a FREE Youth Basketball & Mentoring Clinic
WHO: NBA/Jr. NBA, National PAL, Leadership Foundation
WHAT: Full Court Press: Prep for Success Basketball/Life Skills Clinic
WHEN: Saturday, July 23, 2016 from 9:00am – 3:00pm
WHERE: The Rainier Community Center• 4600 38th Avenue S. Seattle, WA 98118

Call or email Cindy Sandino-Chang 206-551-7316 to reserve your spot. cindy.sandino-chang@seattle.gov

Mayor Murray addresses police reform and accountability

Mayor Murray addresses police reform and accountability
July 7, 2016 by Office of the Mayor

Today, Mayor Ed Murray delivered the following remarks regarding the deaths of Philando Castile and Alton Sterling, and police reform and accountability:

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As I have said many times before, the issue of race and racism is the greatest challenge we face as a country, particularly as racism impacts the black community.

This week, within 24 hours, two black men, Philando Castile and Alton Sterling were killed by police officers.

I am deeply disturbed by police action resulting in the death of any person. And today my thoughts are with the victims’ families, children, and loved ones during this extremely difficult and sad time.

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I know the black community are walking with a heavy heart and a sense of outrage, injustice and fear. Had Castile or Sterling been white, I believe they would still be here with us today.

Their deaths are two in a long line of tragedies that feed mistrust between communities of color and the police, particularly the mothers, fathers, brothers, sisters and children of black men.

As I have said on the night of the Ferguson grand jury verdict, we cannot let this gulf of mistrust divide us and continue to cause this fear and pain.

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This is why we must get police reform right in Seattle.

The Department of Justice should lead the investigations into these killings.

The shooting deaths of black men at the hands of police have brought the attention of the Department of Justice to many cities across the nation, including our own.

Since I became mayor, this City has been committed to working with the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice and the federal courts to make dramatic reforms in the Seattle Police Department to comply with the federally mandated consent decree.

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In partnership with the Department of Justice and the Federal Monitor that oversees our consent decree, we are creating a model Force Review Board that is being replicated across the country.

The Force Review Board reviews every serious use of force by a Seattle Police Officer. And present at every Force Review Board are representatives from the Department of Justice, the Monitoring Team, a civilian representative from the Office of Professional Accountability, and a citizen observer.

So unlike Minneapolis or Louisiana, the Department of Justice is already here, and we are working with them closely to create best practices in reviewing police uses of force.

Where other jurisdictions are just now contemplating where to start, we are already well down the road of reform, and other cities are coming to us to learn from our experience.

In fact, Chief O’Toole is in D.C. today at the Center of Policing Equity to speak at an event sponsored by the Department of Justice about the issues of race and policing.

In the coming months, I will send legislation to Seattle City Council that will expand and strengthen civilian oversight and independent review of the Seattle Police Department.

It is my goal to create a permanent citizen oversight commission that is the strongest in this city’s history.

It is my goal to create a more independent director of the police accountability process, on the model of the ethics and elections commission, which is completely independent of the mayor and council.

It is my goal to create a stronger auditor of the police discipline process on the model of an inspector general, with greater authority to investigate complaints.

And we will use a community process similar to the one used to hire Chief O’Toole to hire for these new roles.

As we move forward, our conversation cannot be about blaming black men, it must be about changing our institutions and systems.

As a white man, I stand as an ally in solidary with the black community.

But I cannot pretend to know their experience.

I cannot know the experience of black men and women everywhere, who live everyday with the fear that one small action of their part could make them the next victim.

I cannot know the experience of raising a black child in our society, and the daily worry that today might be the day they do not come home because they were taken by a bullet.

What I do know is that white Americans have work to do. We, the beneficiaries of hundreds of years of structural inequality, must use our privilege to construct a more just society.

This has been my commitment every single day as mayor.

Everything we have accomplished during my time in this office…

…pre-k, the minimum wage, transit, priority hire, parks and community centers, police reform, summer youth employment, our education summit…

…they are our response to addressing the issue of race and inequality.

To Seattle’s residents of color, your city cares about you. Your lives matter. The fact that we even need to state that Black Lives Matter is the result of our failure to address racism in our society.

To white residents of Seattle, let us work with our sisters and brothers of color to end structural and institutional racism.”

– See more at: http://murray.seattle.gov/mayor-murray-addresses-police-reform-and-accountability/#sthash.ARaN9TA2.IRKcdSfy.dpuf

Mayor delivers remarks on officer involved shootings
7/7/201631:11

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray delivers remarks on the recent officer involved shootings in Louisiana and Minnesota.

http://www.seattlechannel.org/embedvideoplayer?videoid=x66208

Seattle Youth Summer and Fall Employment 2016

YOUTH EMPLOYMENT

3rd Trimester
Application opens: August 1, 2016
Application deadline: September 1, 2016
Internships: Oct. 19th – December 9th
150 hours, up to 8 weeks

ENROLLMENT OPEN:
Aug 1st, 2016 – Sept 9th, 2016

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The City of Seattle Youth Employment Program (SYEP) supports participants with comprehensive internship opportunities aimed at meeting the employment needs of underserved youth and young adults in our community; promoting their work readiness and ultimately strengthening their career development.

How to Get Involved
The Seattle Youth Employment Program (SYEP) would like to introduce to you its new Internship Program for 2016!

As part of Mayor Ed Murray’s Mayor’s Youth Employment Initiative, SYEP has shifted its programming focus to continue increasing internship and work readiness opportunities. Starting in 2016, SYEP’s internship program will be available in a year-round trimester based model.

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1st Trimester
Applications closed

2nd Trimester
Application opens: April 1, 2016
Application deadline: May 2, 2016
Internships: June 29th – Aug. 19th
150 hours, up to 7 weeks

Not all youth who apply will be placed or be eligible to be placed. Eligible participants are provided with:

Job coaching and encouragement
Job readiness training
Career exploration
Transportation support to/from internship site
Internships and jobs with a variety of Seattle area businesses
There are a limited number of spots and every effort will be made to place those picked in preferred locations.

To apply, call 206-386-1375 or submit an application online.

If you are in need of computer access, please connect with your local community center or library branch for support. Official hard copy applications will be available by contacting the SYEP office.

For more information on SYEP’s program, including eligibility requirements, please contact our office.

Community Providers
If you are interested in recommending a youth or young adult to the Seattle Youth Employment Program, please contact our main office to submit an SYEP Recommendation Form and for additional support.

Internship Host
If you are interested in hosting a youth or young adult in your company or organization, please see the Mayor’s Youth Employment Initiative here!

Seattle Youth Employment Program (SYEP)