2017 Seattle Youth Employment Program (SYEP).

YOUTH EMPLOYMENT
Read more APPLICATION HERE

The Seattle Youth Employment Program (SYEP), in support of the Mayor’s Youth Employment Initiative, provides internship opportunities aimed at meeting the employment needs of underserved youth and young adults in our community. By promoting work readiness and strengthening career development, SYEP helps to prepare and support youth for real world jobs by providing them with the skills necessary to be competitive in the job market.

SYEP Internships
Read more APPLICATION HERE

Internships start July 5, 2017 and end August 15, 2017.

Enrollment
Applications open March 13, 2017 and close April 14, 2017.

Internships will be offered on a first-come, first-serve basis.

Eligibility
City of Seattle Resident
Ages 16 to 24

Demonstrated ability to be responsible, determined and committed
Meet HUD Income Guidelines

group of happy college students looking back

Read more APPLICATION HERE

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Volunteer with Inmates and Detainees

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Dedicated. Compassionate. Committed.

Volunteers are selfless individuals who are inspired to make a difference and change lives. And we’re proud to say that many such volunteers have found a home, serving inmates and detainees within our facilities, mending the broken-spirited, and giving hope to those who just needed someone to believe in them.

At CCA, we believe in the value of volunteers who give of their time to benefit inmates and detainees and to serve the interests of their communities, religious organizations, or other non-profit organizations. We seek to provide volunteers with opportunities to fulfill their charitable missions and work to the benefit of inmates and detainees. These volunteers are encouraged to apply to enter our facilities, with the understanding that they are serving not on CCA’s behalf – but on behalf of the men and women who are incarcerated.

CCA is a correctional system with nearly 70 prisons, jails, detention centers and residential reentry centers across the country. We operate safe and secure correctional facilities that protect our communities, provide thousands of jobs, and serve as place for growth and renewal for the inmates in our care.

Read more FULL REPORT

9/11/16 – John T. Williams Memorial Crosswalk

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In conjunction with the Seattle Police Department (SPD), Seattle’s Department of Neighborhoods, Seattle Indian Health Board and the SPD’s Native American Police Advisory Council we invite all media outlets and the community to attend a ground breaking ceremony for a new community crosswalk on the corner of Boren & Howell on Sunday, September 11th at 8 – 9 a.m.

The crosswalk will be in honor of and in the memory of John T. Williams. The crosswalk groundbreaking shall include a cleansing ceremony, the story behind the crosswalk and an opportunity for the press to ask questions of the organizers. The planned crosswalk depicts a Nuu-chah-nulth story about the White Deer. The story of the White Deer shall be read and available in written form for people at the event. Members from the above host organizations and the family of John T. Williams shall be available to answer your questions about the project. Light snacks and coffee will be provided.

We hope that the crosswalk helps people remember the life of John T. Williams, a Nuu-chah-nulth woodcarver. We also hope that the crosswalk also continues the subsequent work done by the Seattle Police Department, the Department of Justice and several members of the American Indian Community to foster positive changes throughout all communities within the City of Seattle and the Seattle Police Department.

Young Leaders in the Green Movement

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In the Spring of 2016 the Young Leaders in the Green Movement hosted a Lunch & Learn with Council Member Lisa Herbold. The Lunch & Learn was a venue for the Young Leaders to speak to community members and council members about the importance of the Young Leader’s Green Pathways campaign. A campaign that calls on the creation of more internships opportunities,

That are good for the environment and our communities at the same time.

That have a racial equity lens in their outreach and ways to retain participants.

This includes paying a living wage.

Have systems in place to help young adults move into career pathways

Now the Young Leaders in the Green Movement have partnered with Council Member Mike O’Brien and Council Member Lisa Herbold to write a resolution to ask the city of Seattle to follow the tenants of the Green Pathways Campaign.

Please join us at the first of two meetings to get this resolution passed!!

Friday, SEPT 23rd 2016 9:30am- 10:30am

City Hall- Council Chambers -Council Member Lisa Herbold’s Civil Rights, Utilities, and Economic Development & Arts Committee Meeting- 600 4th Ave. Seattle, WA 98122

RSVP TODAY!

Reform advocates upset over pushback over changing malice law

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Members of the legislative task force formed to recommend policy to next year’s Legislature on how to reduce violent interactions involving law enforcement listen Tuesday to executive director Sue Rahr of the state Criminal Justice Training Center during their meeting at the Burien facility. Peter Haley phaley@thenewstribune.com

When an effort by state lawmakers to make prosecuting police for improper use of deadly force easier stalled last year, legislators compromised.

They agreed to let a task force study the issue and recommend policy to next year’s Legislature on how to reduce violent interactions involving law enforcement.

Read more here: http://www.thenewstribune.com/news/politics-government/article92684372.html#storylink=cpy

But some on the state-appointed committee, which had its second meeting Tuesday, say lawmakers overseeing the panel are filibustering even a dialogue about changing controversial state law regulating police use of deadly force.

Read more FULL ARTICLE

Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion

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LEAD (Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion) caseworker Tim Candela, right, attends a LEAD meeting at the SPD West Precinct

From: CapitolHillSeattle

In recent weeks, East Precinct officers have been trained to participate in the Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion program. LEAD now joins the already functioning Multi-Disciplinary Team program on Capitol Hill in giving law enforcement new options and resources for dealing with addiction. Officials are looking at ways the two programs can work together.

According to Public Defender Association director Lisa Daugaard, all East Precinct police officers will be trained to participate in LEAD by the end of the month. Until now only West Precinct officers have been able to recommend people for LEAD participation. There was initial talk of only expanding the program to Capitol Hill, but “Capitol Hill community leaders actually pushed for inclusion of the rest of the precinct on racial justice grounds,” because, according to Daugaard, community leaders felt that parts of the East Precinct with a higher percentage of minorities than Capitol Hill should also benefit from the program. Daugaard said she anticipates that once East Precinct officers have been trained, “there will probably be significantly more referrals” for the LEAD program.

Mayor Ed Murray announced the planned expansion of the MDT and LEAD programs to Capitol Hill in fall 2015. MDT was expanded to Capitol Hill in January, and Metropolitan Improvement District vice president Dave Willard said so far results have been “pretty encouraging.” Outreach workers for MDT joined East Precinct officers on patrols, and now those officers are being trained to do some outreach of their own.

Visit the LEAD website

Saturday July 16 – East Precinct Community Picnic

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You are invited to a community picnic with the Seattle Police and the neighborhood surrounding Powell Barnett Park next Saturday, July 16, 1pm to 4pm, at Powell Barnett Park, MLK JR Way, between E Yesler and E Cherry. This is a community policing/fun activity — music, hot dogs and ice cream, entertainment and door prizes.

East Precinct Community Picnic

WHEN: Saturday, July 16, 2016 – 1:00 pm @ 1:00 PM – 4:00 PM
WHERE: Powell Barnett Park
Powell Barnett Park
352 Martin Luther King Jr Way, Seattle, WA 98122

See Event Website

Mayor Murray addresses police reform and accountability

Mayor Murray addresses police reform and accountability
July 7, 2016 by Office of the Mayor

Today, Mayor Ed Murray delivered the following remarks regarding the deaths of Philando Castile and Alton Sterling, and police reform and accountability:

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As I have said many times before, the issue of race and racism is the greatest challenge we face as a country, particularly as racism impacts the black community.

This week, within 24 hours, two black men, Philando Castile and Alton Sterling were killed by police officers.

I am deeply disturbed by police action resulting in the death of any person. And today my thoughts are with the victims’ families, children, and loved ones during this extremely difficult and sad time.

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I know the black community are walking with a heavy heart and a sense of outrage, injustice and fear. Had Castile or Sterling been white, I believe they would still be here with us today.

Their deaths are two in a long line of tragedies that feed mistrust between communities of color and the police, particularly the mothers, fathers, brothers, sisters and children of black men.

As I have said on the night of the Ferguson grand jury verdict, we cannot let this gulf of mistrust divide us and continue to cause this fear and pain.

police-lives-matter

This is why we must get police reform right in Seattle.

The Department of Justice should lead the investigations into these killings.

The shooting deaths of black men at the hands of police have brought the attention of the Department of Justice to many cities across the nation, including our own.

Since I became mayor, this City has been committed to working with the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice and the federal courts to make dramatic reforms in the Seattle Police Department to comply with the federally mandated consent decree.

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In partnership with the Department of Justice and the Federal Monitor that oversees our consent decree, we are creating a model Force Review Board that is being replicated across the country.

The Force Review Board reviews every serious use of force by a Seattle Police Officer. And present at every Force Review Board are representatives from the Department of Justice, the Monitoring Team, a civilian representative from the Office of Professional Accountability, and a citizen observer.

So unlike Minneapolis or Louisiana, the Department of Justice is already here, and we are working with them closely to create best practices in reviewing police uses of force.

Where other jurisdictions are just now contemplating where to start, we are already well down the road of reform, and other cities are coming to us to learn from our experience.

In fact, Chief O’Toole is in D.C. today at the Center of Policing Equity to speak at an event sponsored by the Department of Justice about the issues of race and policing.

In the coming months, I will send legislation to Seattle City Council that will expand and strengthen civilian oversight and independent review of the Seattle Police Department.

It is my goal to create a permanent citizen oversight commission that is the strongest in this city’s history.

It is my goal to create a more independent director of the police accountability process, on the model of the ethics and elections commission, which is completely independent of the mayor and council.

It is my goal to create a stronger auditor of the police discipline process on the model of an inspector general, with greater authority to investigate complaints.

And we will use a community process similar to the one used to hire Chief O’Toole to hire for these new roles.

As we move forward, our conversation cannot be about blaming black men, it must be about changing our institutions and systems.

As a white man, I stand as an ally in solidary with the black community.

But I cannot pretend to know their experience.

I cannot know the experience of black men and women everywhere, who live everyday with the fear that one small action of their part could make them the next victim.

I cannot know the experience of raising a black child in our society, and the daily worry that today might be the day they do not come home because they were taken by a bullet.

What I do know is that white Americans have work to do. We, the beneficiaries of hundreds of years of structural inequality, must use our privilege to construct a more just society.

This has been my commitment every single day as mayor.

Everything we have accomplished during my time in this office…

…pre-k, the minimum wage, transit, priority hire, parks and community centers, police reform, summer youth employment, our education summit…

…they are our response to addressing the issue of race and inequality.

To Seattle’s residents of color, your city cares about you. Your lives matter. The fact that we even need to state that Black Lives Matter is the result of our failure to address racism in our society.

To white residents of Seattle, let us work with our sisters and brothers of color to end structural and institutional racism.”

– See more at: http://murray.seattle.gov/mayor-murray-addresses-police-reform-and-accountability/#sthash.ARaN9TA2.IRKcdSfy.dpuf

Mayor delivers remarks on officer involved shootings
7/7/201631:11

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray delivers remarks on the recent officer involved shootings in Louisiana and Minnesota.

http://www.seattlechannel.org/embedvideoplayer?videoid=x66208