JOIN: Project Safe Neighborhoods

Project Safe Neighborhoods

Gun Violence Remains a Major Problem in the United States

According to the National Crime Victimization Survey, 467,321 persons were victims of a crime committed with a firearm in 2011. In the same year, data collected by the FBI show that firearms were used in 68 percent of murders, 41 percent of robbery offenses and 21 percent of aggravated assaults nationwide.[

People between the ages of 15 and 24 are most likely to be targeted by gun violence. From 1976 to 2005, 77 percent of homicide victims ages 15-17 died from gun-related injuries. This age group was most at risk for gun violence during this time period.

Teens and young adults are more likely than persons of other ages to be murdered with a gun. Most violent gun crime, especially homicide, occurs in cities and urban communities. More information is available on the Office of Justice Programs National Institute of Justice website.

Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN) is a nationwide commitment to reduce gun crime in America by networking existing local programs that target gun crime and providing those programs with additional tools to fit the specific gun crime problems in each area. The goal is to create safer neighborhoods by reducing gun violence and sustaining that reduction.

For further information on this District’s PSN effort please contact:

Assistant U.S. Attorney Erin Becker
PSN Coordinator
206-553-7970

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Prison Reform and Redemption Act 2018

LIVE: President Donald Trump Delivers Remarks At Prison Reform Summit – May 18, 2018 | CNBC

Summary: H.R.3356 — 115th Congress (2017-2018)All Information (Except Text)
There is one summary for H.R.3356. Bill summaries are authored by CRS.

Introduced in House (07/24/2017)
Prison Reform and Redemption Act

This bill directs the Department of Justice to develop the Post-Sentencing Risk and Needs Assessment System for use by the Bureau of Prisons (BOP) to assess prisoner recidivism risk; guide housing, grouping, and program assignments; and incentivize and reward participation in and completion of recidivism reduction programs and productive activities.

It amends the federal criminal code to:

require the BOP to implement the Post-Sentencing Risk and Needs Assessment System;
establish prerelease custody procedures for prisoners who, among other things, earn time credits for successfully completing recidivism reduction programs or productive activities;
prohibit, subject to specified exceptions, the use of restraints on federal prisoners who are pregnant or in postpartum recovery; and
broaden the duties of probation and pretrial services officers to include court-directed supervision of sex offenders conditionally released from civil commitment.
The BOP must:

incorporate de-escalation techniques into its training programs;
report on its ability to treat heroin and opioid abuse through medication-assisted treatment;
establish pilot programs on youth mentorship and service to abandoned, rescued, or vulnerable animals; and
designate a release preparation coordinator at each facility that houses prisoners.
The bill prohibits monitoring the contents of an electronic communication between a prisoner at a BOP facility and the prisoner’s attorney.

It amends the Second Chance Act of 2007 to reauthorize through FY2022 and modify eligibility criteria for an elderly offender early release pilot program.

Lieutenant Osvaldo Albarati Correctional Officer Self-Protection Act of 2017

The bill amends the federal criminal code to require the BOP to allow federal correctional officers to securely store and carry concealed firearms on BOP premises outside the security perimeter of a prison.

Read more HERE