KENT: Amazon Jobs Day Wed August 2, 2017

Jonathan Vanian
Jul 26, 2017

Amazon is going on a hiring spree.

The online retail giant said Wednesday that it plans to hire 50,000 workers as part of a jobs fair it calls Amazon Jobs Day.

On August 2, Amazon (AMZN, -1.02%) said it would invite interested job candidates to ten of its various fulfillment centers across the U.S. From 8 a.m. to noon on that day, Amazon staff will show prospective employees tours of their warehousing facilities, perform interviews, and “make thousands of on-the-spot job offers to qualified candidates,” according to the announcement.

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Amazon vice president of worldwide operations and human resources John Olsen said in a statement that the jobs would offer “highly-competitive wages” and benefits.

“These are great opportunities with runway for advancement,” Olsen said. “In fact, of our entry level managers across Amazon’s U.S. fulfillment centers, nearly 15% started in hourly roles and were promoted into their current positions.”

Prospective job candidates can expect these fulfillment center roles to involve a lot of picking, packing, and shipping of the various goods Amazon distributes each day throughout the U.S.

Of the 50,000 open position, Amazon said over 10,000 will be part-time jobs.
Here’s a list of the cities Amazon will host its jobs fair: Baltimore, Md.; Chattanooga, Tenn.; Etna, Ohio.; Fall River, Mass.; Hebron, Ky.; Kenosha, Wis.; Kent, Wash.; Robbinsville, N.J.; Romeoville, Ill.; Whitestown, Ind.; Buffalo, N.Y. (part-time work only); Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, Okla. (part-time work only).
Amazon’s big jobs push seems to follow up on an earlier announcement Amazon made in January when it said it plans to hire 100,000 full-time employees by the middle of 2018. Besides warehouse workers, Amazon also wants to hire software engineers, data scientists, and customer service workers.If Amazon were to hire 100,000 workers by 2018, it would employ over 280,000 U.S. employees.

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BLS REVIEW: EMPLOYMENT AND UNEMPLOYMENT AMONG YOUTH — SUMMER 2016

Employment and Unemployment Among Youth Summary
For release 10:00 a.m. (EDT) Wednesday, August 17, 2016 USDL-16-1687

Technical information: (202) 691-6378 * cpsinfo@bls.gov * http://www.bls.gov/cps
Media contact: (202) 691-5902 * PressOffice@bls.gov

EMPLOYMENT AND UNEMPLOYMENT AMONG YOUTH — SUMMER 2016

From April to July 2016, the number of employed youth 16 to 24 years old increased by
1.9 million to 20.5 million, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. This
year, 53.2 percent of young people were employed in July, little changed from a year
earlier. (The month of July typically is the summertime peak in youth employment.)
Unemployment among youth rose by 611,000 from April to July 2016, compared with an
increase of 654,000 for the same period in 2015. (Because this analysis focuses on the
seasonal changes in youth employment and unemployment that occur each spring and summer,
the data are not seasonally adjusted.)

Labor Force

The youth labor force–16- to 24-year-olds working or actively looking for work–grows
sharply between April and July each year. During these months, large numbers of high
school and college students search for or take summer jobs, and many graduates enter
the labor market to look for or begin permanent employment. This summer, the youth
labor force grew by 2.6 million, or 12.4 percent, to a total of 23.1 million in July.
(See table 1.)

The labor force participation rate for all youth was 60.1 percent in July, little
changed from a year earlier. (The labor force participation rate is the proportion
of the civilian noninstitutional population that is working or looking and available
for work.) (See table 2.) The summer labor force participation rate of youth has held
fairly steady since July 2010, after trending downward for the prior two decades. The
summer youth labor force participation rate peaked at 77.5 percent in July 1989.

The July 2016 labor force participation rate for 16- to 24-year-old men was 62.4
percent, higher than the rate for young women at 57.7 percent. The rates for men and
women were little changed from last July. Whites had the highest youth labor force
participation rate in July 2016 at 62.7 percent. The rate was 53.8 percent for Blacks,
43.1 percent for Asians, and 56.2 percent for Hispanics. The rate for Blacks declined
by 2.6 percentage points from last July, while the rates for Whites, Asians, and
Hispanics showed little or no change.

Employment

In July 2016, there were 20.5 million employed 16- to 24-year-olds, little changed
from the summer before. Between April and July 2016, the number of employed youth
rose by 1.9 million. The employment-population ratio for youth in July 2016–the
proportion of the 16- to 24-year-old civilian noninstitutional population with a
job–was 53.2 percent, little changed from the year before. (See tables 1 and 2.)

The July 2016 employment-population ratios for young men (54.9 percent), women (51.5
percent), Whites (56.5 percent), Blacks (42.7 percent), Asians (38.8 percent), and
Hispanics (49.8 percent) showed little or no change from last July.

In July 2016, the largest percentage of employed youth worked in the leisure and
hospitality industry (25 percent), which includes food services. An additional 18
percent of employed youth worked in the retail trade industry, and 13 percent worked
in education and health services. (See table 3.)

Unemployment

The youth unemployment rate (11.5 percent) and the number of unemployed youth (2.6
million) in July 2016 were little changed from a year earlier. Of those 2.6 million
unemployed 16- to 24-year-olds, 1.9 million were looking for full-time work in July
2016, down 222,000 from July 2015. (See tables 1 and 2.)

The July 2016 unemployment rates for young men (12.0 percent), women (10.8 percent),
Whites (9.9 percent), Blacks (20.6 percent), Asians (10.0 percent), and Hispanics
(11.3 percent) also showed little or no change from last July. (See table 2.)

EMPLOYMENT AND UNEMPLOYMENT AMONG YOUTH — SUMMER 2016

Officer Performs CPR on Man Overdosing, Saves Life

Officer Performs CPR on Man Overdosing, Saves Life
Written by Detective Mark Jamieson on April 20, 2017 11:24 am

Just before 2:00 am Thursday morning officers responded to a report of a man overdosing in an abandoned house in the 1000 block of E. Republican Street. Officer Do located a woman inside the house, calling for medics and screaming that someone was dying. Officer Do entered the house and located an unconscious man lying on the floor. The man was not breathing and did not have a detectable pulse. Officer Do immediately began CPR on the man and continued until he regained consciousness. Seattle Fire personnel arrived and provided the man with additional medical aid. The 37-year-old man was treated at the scene and later transported to the hospital for further evaluation.

As a reminder, Washington law provides immunity from criminal drug possession charges for anyone seeking medical aid for themselves or someone else experiencing an overdose.

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SeaTac: Register for Airport University Classes!

Register for Airport University Classes!

Do you work at Sea-Tac Airport? Take college classes at the airport!

Airport University classes start April 3rd! Register today!

We partner with Highline College and South Seattle College to offer classes in Computer Skills, Customer Service, Security, and Workplace Safety. Classes are FREE for income-eligible students.
See flyer for REGISTRATION information and class details.

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