URGE KING COUNTY TO FOLLOW THE OPIATE TASK FORCE RECOMMENDATIONS


The opiate epidemic in King County is growing. The King County Opiate Addiction Task Force has recommended a new comprehensive strategy to fight this crisis, including the opening of two pilot safe consumption spaces. In these facilities, healthcare professionals can prevent overdose deaths, reduce the spread of diseases like HIV and Hepatitis C, and efficiently refer people struggling with addiction to treatment. Tell the King County Council to support this safe, effective, and scientifically proven method of responding to the opiate epidemic.

URGE KING COUNTY TO FOLLOW THE OPIATE TASK FORCE RECOMMENDATIONS

Please visit THIS LINK

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Councilmember Bagshaw on Opiate Addiction Taskforce Findings

Councilmember Sally Bagshaw (District 7, Pioneer Square to Magnolia) issued the following statement following the release of the Opiate Addiction Task Force’s recommendations:

“Opiate addiction is a terrible reality, and it’s a problem that we have seen across the nation. Addiction clearly exacerbates the struggle for those seeking to overcome homelessness, which is why I’m so heartened to receive the Opiate Addiction Task Force’s findings. My goal as a Seattle/King County Board of Public Health member is to implement proven best practices in Seattle to reverse this opioid crisis and provide tested options for people.

“I’m particularly drawn to the Task Force’s recommendation that we enhance access to buprenorphine, which is an effective tool to treat opioid addiction. As Council considers next year’s annual City budget, I intend to identify funding for a Belltown facility that will provide professional buprenorphine access for those looking to conquer or suppress their addictions.

“I witnessed firsthand the success of a similar buprenorphine program on my study mission to San Francisco this past May. With clinical help and a physician’s counseling, buprenorphine can be obtained through pharmacies or health clinics across San Francisco. When addicts are ready to seek treatment, they should not be put on a wait list—they need treatment right away. That’s why we need ‘treatment on demand’ to dramatically reduce the number of people addicted to heroin. Bupe is one of the alternatives that works.

Read more FULL REPORT

Young Leaders in the Green Movement

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In the Spring of 2016 the Young Leaders in the Green Movement hosted a Lunch & Learn with Council Member Lisa Herbold. The Lunch & Learn was a venue for the Young Leaders to speak to community members and council members about the importance of the Young Leader’s Green Pathways campaign. A campaign that calls on the creation of more internships opportunities,

That are good for the environment and our communities at the same time.

That have a racial equity lens in their outreach and ways to retain participants.

This includes paying a living wage.

Have systems in place to help young adults move into career pathways

Now the Young Leaders in the Green Movement have partnered with Council Member Mike O’Brien and Council Member Lisa Herbold to write a resolution to ask the city of Seattle to follow the tenants of the Green Pathways Campaign.

Please join us at the first of two meetings to get this resolution passed!!

Friday, SEPT 23rd 2016 9:30am- 10:30am

City Hall- Council Chambers -Council Member Lisa Herbold’s Civil Rights, Utilities, and Economic Development & Arts Committee Meeting- 600 4th Ave. Seattle, WA 98122

RSVP TODAY!

Reform advocates upset over pushback over changing malice law

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Members of the legislative task force formed to recommend policy to next year’s Legislature on how to reduce violent interactions involving law enforcement listen Tuesday to executive director Sue Rahr of the state Criminal Justice Training Center during their meeting at the Burien facility. Peter Haley phaley@thenewstribune.com

When an effort by state lawmakers to make prosecuting police for improper use of deadly force easier stalled last year, legislators compromised.

They agreed to let a task force study the issue and recommend policy to next year’s Legislature on how to reduce violent interactions involving law enforcement.

Read more here: http://www.thenewstribune.com/news/politics-government/article92684372.html#storylink=cpy

But some on the state-appointed committee, which had its second meeting Tuesday, say lawmakers overseeing the panel are filibustering even a dialogue about changing controversial state law regulating police use of deadly force.

Read more FULL ARTICLE

VOCAL Washington on Seattle Capitol Hill This Week

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From: CapitolHillSeattle

Meanwhile, another potential public health intervention for chronic drug users is making the rounds in Seattle. A mock safe consumption site for drug users set up by VOCAL Washington is making stops on Capitol Hill this week. The site targets users who inject and provides low-threshold access to a supervised space to consume pre-obtained illicit drugs, clean equipment, emergency care in the case of overdoses, and referrals to healthcare and drug treatment services if desired by the user.

On Monday, the site was set up in Cal Anderson from noon to 7 PM. Advocate Ashley Hempelmann said safe consumption sites cut down on transferrals of drug users to hospitals and public disorder. There are no cities in the U.S. currently using safe consumption sites.

VOCAL’s Patricia Sully said the pop-up site in the middle a city park is a way to make it easy for lots of people to learn more about how the resource would work — not demonstrate an actual working consumption site.

Visit VOCAL Washington website

Mayor Murray addresses police reform and accountability

Mayor Murray addresses police reform and accountability
July 7, 2016 by Office of the Mayor

Today, Mayor Ed Murray delivered the following remarks regarding the deaths of Philando Castile and Alton Sterling, and police reform and accountability:

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As I have said many times before, the issue of race and racism is the greatest challenge we face as a country, particularly as racism impacts the black community.

This week, within 24 hours, two black men, Philando Castile and Alton Sterling were killed by police officers.

I am deeply disturbed by police action resulting in the death of any person. And today my thoughts are with the victims’ families, children, and loved ones during this extremely difficult and sad time.

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I know the black community are walking with a heavy heart and a sense of outrage, injustice and fear. Had Castile or Sterling been white, I believe they would still be here with us today.

Their deaths are two in a long line of tragedies that feed mistrust between communities of color and the police, particularly the mothers, fathers, brothers, sisters and children of black men.

As I have said on the night of the Ferguson grand jury verdict, we cannot let this gulf of mistrust divide us and continue to cause this fear and pain.

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This is why we must get police reform right in Seattle.

The Department of Justice should lead the investigations into these killings.

The shooting deaths of black men at the hands of police have brought the attention of the Department of Justice to many cities across the nation, including our own.

Since I became mayor, this City has been committed to working with the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice and the federal courts to make dramatic reforms in the Seattle Police Department to comply with the federally mandated consent decree.

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In partnership with the Department of Justice and the Federal Monitor that oversees our consent decree, we are creating a model Force Review Board that is being replicated across the country.

The Force Review Board reviews every serious use of force by a Seattle Police Officer. And present at every Force Review Board are representatives from the Department of Justice, the Monitoring Team, a civilian representative from the Office of Professional Accountability, and a citizen observer.

So unlike Minneapolis or Louisiana, the Department of Justice is already here, and we are working with them closely to create best practices in reviewing police uses of force.

Where other jurisdictions are just now contemplating where to start, we are already well down the road of reform, and other cities are coming to us to learn from our experience.

In fact, Chief O’Toole is in D.C. today at the Center of Policing Equity to speak at an event sponsored by the Department of Justice about the issues of race and policing.

In the coming months, I will send legislation to Seattle City Council that will expand and strengthen civilian oversight and independent review of the Seattle Police Department.

It is my goal to create a permanent citizen oversight commission that is the strongest in this city’s history.

It is my goal to create a more independent director of the police accountability process, on the model of the ethics and elections commission, which is completely independent of the mayor and council.

It is my goal to create a stronger auditor of the police discipline process on the model of an inspector general, with greater authority to investigate complaints.

And we will use a community process similar to the one used to hire Chief O’Toole to hire for these new roles.

As we move forward, our conversation cannot be about blaming black men, it must be about changing our institutions and systems.

As a white man, I stand as an ally in solidary with the black community.

But I cannot pretend to know their experience.

I cannot know the experience of black men and women everywhere, who live everyday with the fear that one small action of their part could make them the next victim.

I cannot know the experience of raising a black child in our society, and the daily worry that today might be the day they do not come home because they were taken by a bullet.

What I do know is that white Americans have work to do. We, the beneficiaries of hundreds of years of structural inequality, must use our privilege to construct a more just society.

This has been my commitment every single day as mayor.

Everything we have accomplished during my time in this office…

…pre-k, the minimum wage, transit, priority hire, parks and community centers, police reform, summer youth employment, our education summit…

…they are our response to addressing the issue of race and inequality.

To Seattle’s residents of color, your city cares about you. Your lives matter. The fact that we even need to state that Black Lives Matter is the result of our failure to address racism in our society.

To white residents of Seattle, let us work with our sisters and brothers of color to end structural and institutional racism.”

– See more at: http://murray.seattle.gov/mayor-murray-addresses-police-reform-and-accountability/#sthash.ARaN9TA2.IRKcdSfy.dpuf

Mayor delivers remarks on officer involved shootings
7/7/201631:11

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray delivers remarks on the recent officer involved shootings in Louisiana and Minnesota.

http://www.seattlechannel.org/embedvideoplayer?videoid=x66208

Seattle Youth Summer and Fall Employment 2016

YOUTH EMPLOYMENT

3rd Trimester
Application opens: August 1, 2016
Application deadline: September 1, 2016
Internships: Oct. 19th – December 9th
150 hours, up to 8 weeks

ENROLLMENT OPEN:
Aug 1st, 2016 – Sept 9th, 2016

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The City of Seattle Youth Employment Program (SYEP) supports participants with comprehensive internship opportunities aimed at meeting the employment needs of underserved youth and young adults in our community; promoting their work readiness and ultimately strengthening their career development.

How to Get Involved
The Seattle Youth Employment Program (SYEP) would like to introduce to you its new Internship Program for 2016!

As part of Mayor Ed Murray’s Mayor’s Youth Employment Initiative, SYEP has shifted its programming focus to continue increasing internship and work readiness opportunities. Starting in 2016, SYEP’s internship program will be available in a year-round trimester based model.

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1st Trimester
Applications closed

2nd Trimester
Application opens: April 1, 2016
Application deadline: May 2, 2016
Internships: June 29th – Aug. 19th
150 hours, up to 7 weeks

Not all youth who apply will be placed or be eligible to be placed. Eligible participants are provided with:

Job coaching and encouragement
Job readiness training
Career exploration
Transportation support to/from internship site
Internships and jobs with a variety of Seattle area businesses
There are a limited number of spots and every effort will be made to place those picked in preferred locations.

To apply, call 206-386-1375 or submit an application online.

If you are in need of computer access, please connect with your local community center or library branch for support. Official hard copy applications will be available by contacting the SYEP office.

For more information on SYEP’s program, including eligibility requirements, please contact our office.

Community Providers
If you are interested in recommending a youth or young adult to the Seattle Youth Employment Program, please contact our main office to submit an SYEP Recommendation Form and for additional support.

Internship Host
If you are interested in hosting a youth or young adult in your company or organization, please see the Mayor’s Youth Employment Initiative here!

Seattle Youth Employment Program (SYEP)

SPOTLIGHT: North Precinct Captain Sean O’Donnell

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PRECINCT CAPTAIN SEAN O’DONNELL

Sean O’Donnell
Captain Sean O’Donnell began his career with the Seattle Police Department in 1981. He has worked in the all of the precincts as a police officer and was a Field Training Officer. In 1986 he transferred to the Seattle Police Traffic Section as a motorcycle officer for six years. He has been assigned as a Media Relations Officer, Industrial Relations Officer, academy instructor, and was assigned as a Detective on the Mayor’s Security Detail. He was promoted to Sergeant in 2001.

As a Sergeant he worked Patrol in the West and North Precincts. He also worked in positions as a Sergeant in Communications and as a Detective Sergeant in the Office of Professional Accountability. When promoted to Lieutenant in 2006 he was assigned as a Watch Commander in the South Precinct. He has been assigned to successive positions as the East Precinct Operations Lieutenant, a West Precinct Watch Commander, and the West Precinct Operations Lieutenant.

Captain O’Donnell was promoted to Captain in 2011, and was assigned as Director for the SPD 911 Communications Section. He most recently served as commander of the Seattle Police Education and Training Section, where he and his staff worked with the federally appointed Monitoring Team and Department of Justice to “operationalize” recently changed department polices into training curriculums, which were delivered to all of the sworn members of the organization.

Captain O’Donnell received an Associate’s Degree in Criminal Justice from Shoreline Community College and a Bachelor of Arts degree in Criminal Justice from Central Washington University. He retired in 2004 from the active/reserve U.S. Army after 24 years, attaining the rank of Command Sergeant Major. He is a graduate of the U.S. Army Sergeants Major Academy. Captain O’Donnell has completed several leadership and management courses including the Senior Management Institute For Police (SMIP), the WACJTC Leadership in Police Organizations (LPO) course, and the 2013 and 2014 Summer Criminal Justice Executive Leadership Institute co-sponsored by CJTC and Seattle University. He has received certification as a Middle Manager from the Washington State Criminal Justice Training Commission.

Captain O’Donnell understands the need for strong community relationships. He believes in working collaboratively with citizens, businesses, service providers and law enforcement partners to work successfully towards the SPD Mission:

“It is the mission of the Seattle Police Department to address crime and improve quality of life through the delivery of constitutional and effective police services, and to do so in a way that reflects the values of our diverse neighborhoods.”

Captain O’Donnell was born in Seattle and was raised in northeast area of the city. He and his wife are the parents of two daughters.

Saturday April 30 – The Mayor’s Education Summit Garfield High School Seattle, WA

The Mayor’s Education Summit

Mayor Edward B. Murray’s Education Summit builds on the City’s existing partnership with Seattle Public Schools to address the disparity in educational opportunity and outcomes that disproportionately impact students of color and those from lower-income families. Community voices and local leaders will share what’s working well in our schools, where more support is needed, and what strategies the City should support to help all students succeed in Seattle’s schools.

“Perhaps the greatest challenge we face in addressing the opportunity gap is the persistent disparities in our public schools,” said Mayor Murray. “This is not just the responsibility of the Seattle school district. All of us have a responsibility to support the success of these students. These children are our children and we must not fail them.”

In the weeks leading up to the summit, the City, Seattle schools, and several community agencies will co-host a series of Community Conversations all over the city to gather ideas and comments about various issues in education from Seattle’s families, students, and communities.

The Mayor’s Education Summit will also be an opportunity to report on the ideas and comments collected at the Community Conversations.

After this event, the Education Summit Advisory Group, comprised of education and community advocates, educators, and business and philanthropic leaders, will help develop recommendations and action items about how the City can best align its resources and efforts around making education more equitable.

Timeline

9:00 am – Arrival and registration
9:30 am – Summit program begins
12:00pm – Lunch
3:15 pm – Closing remarks
3:30 pm – Resource fair

Additional agenda details can be found at:
http://www.seattle.gov/educationsummit

Read more FULL REPORT
Discussion

May 5 – Youth 16-24 Seattle Opportunity & Job Fair !

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Your Future Starts Here Seattle & King County.

Are you between 16 and 24 and not in school or working?

More than 30 national and local companies want to hire you!

Register now!

Hundreds of Interviews & On the Spot Offers –
Register TODAY to guarantee your interview!

When: May 5th, 9 am to 4 pm – Come for most of the day or just a few hours

Where: CenturyLink Field Event Center, 1000 Occidental Ave, Seattle, WA 98134

What: Seattle Opportunity & Job Fair – Access everything you need to help with your job search or education

Meet and interview with more than 30 companies
Practice your interview skills with one-on-one coaching
Create or improve your resume with personalized support
Get help with job applications
Learn about options to complete high school and explore college
Tap into legal resources for youth involved with the justice system or interested in immigration services
Find a mentor, a job training program, and much more!
FREE FOOD!

Looking for a ride to the Opportunity Fair? Lyft is providing up to $50 of ride share credit for registered attendees who are new users and over 18 years old. Click here to get your ride code! Under 18 or not a new user to Lyft? Bus passes will also be available at the fair.

Follow the 100,000 Opportunities Initiative on Facebook or Twitter for updates. You’ll also find great tools to help you get ready at http://www.startsomewhere.org.

Looking for a flyer about the fair? Click here to download.