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Meth, the Forgotten Killer, Is Back. And It’s Everywhere

PORTLAND, Ore. — They huddled against the biting wind, pacing from one corner to another hoping to score heroin or pills. But a different drug was far more likely to be on offer outside the train station downtown, where homeless drug users live in tents pitched on the sidewalk.

“Everybody has meth around here — everybody,” said Sean, a 27-year-old heroin user who hangs out downtown and gave only his first name. “It’s the easiest to find.”

The scourge of crystal meth, with its exploding labs and ruinous effect on teeth and skin, has been all but forgotten amid national concern over the opioid crisis. But 12 years after Congress took aggressive action to curtail it, meth has returned with a vengeance.

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URGE KING COUNTY TO FOLLOW THE OPIATE TASK FORCE RECOMMENDATIONS


The opiate epidemic in King County is growing. The King County Opiate Addiction Task Force has recommended a new comprehensive strategy to fight this crisis, including the opening of two pilot safe consumption spaces. In these facilities, healthcare professionals can prevent overdose deaths, reduce the spread of diseases like HIV and Hepatitis C, and efficiently refer people struggling with addiction to treatment. Tell the King County Council to support this safe, effective, and scientifically proven method of responding to the opiate epidemic.

URGE KING COUNTY TO FOLLOW THE OPIATE TASK FORCE RECOMMENDATIONS

Please visit THIS LINK

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Volunteer with Inmates and Detainees

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Dedicated. Compassionate. Committed.

Volunteers are selfless individuals who are inspired to make a difference and change lives. And we’re proud to say that many such volunteers have found a home, serving inmates and detainees within our facilities, mending the broken-spirited, and giving hope to those who just needed someone to believe in them.

At CCA, we believe in the value of volunteers who give of their time to benefit inmates and detainees and to serve the interests of their communities, religious organizations, or other non-profit organizations. We seek to provide volunteers with opportunities to fulfill their charitable missions and work to the benefit of inmates and detainees. These volunteers are encouraged to apply to enter our facilities, with the understanding that they are serving not on CCA’s behalf – but on behalf of the men and women who are incarcerated.

CCA is a correctional system with nearly 70 prisons, jails, detention centers and residential reentry centers across the country. We operate safe and secure correctional facilities that protect our communities, provide thousands of jobs, and serve as place for growth and renewal for the inmates in our care.

Read more FULL REPORT

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Department of Justice to Launch Inaugural National Heroin and Opioid Awareness Week

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Department of Justice to Launch Inaugural National Heroin and Opioid Awareness Week

Attorney General Lynch will Travel to Lexington, Kentucky as Part of the Justice Department’s Awareness Campaign to Address the Rising Public Health Crisis of Drug Addiction

The Obama Administration is announcing a “week of action” to raise awareness about the rising public health crisis caused by drug overdoses. As part of this effort, the Department of Justice designated the week of Sept.18-23, 2016, as National Heroin and Opioid Awareness Week. Senior Department of Justice officials, members of the President’s Cabinet and other federal agencies will hold events focused on the work being done to address the national prescription opioid and heroin epidemic.

Attorney General Loretta E. Lynch will travel to Lexington, Kentucky on TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2016, to hold a youth town hall at a local high school; meet with parents who have lost their children due to overdoses and now belong to the Heroin Education Action Team (H.E.A.T.); and deliver a policy speech regarding the actions and resources the Justice Department is bringing to bear on this issue.

“The heroin and opioid epidemic is one of the most urgent law enforcement and public health challenges facing our country,” said Attorney General Lynch. “Through National Heroin and Opioid Awareness Week, the Department of Justice seeks to raise awareness and prevent new victims from succumbing to addiction; to highlight the department’s ongoing commitment to holding accountable traffickers and others responsible for this epidemic; and to help provide treatment to those grappling with addiction. To be successful in this important endeavor, we need the help of all our federal, tribal, state and local partners. In the months ahead, we will continue working to erase this scourge from our communities and to ensure a brighter future for all Americans.”

Read more FULL REPORT

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Here’s how to send love and support to injured officer, family

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A Mount Vernon police officer shot in the head is in “very critical” condition, a Harborview spokesperson said at a Friday morning press conference.

The hospital says the officer, 61, was in surgery for at least a few hours. Read developing updates here.

Hospital officials did not release any updates on the officer’s current condition, but said that concerned community members can send messages of love and support to the injured officer and his family via the Harboview website. Click here to visit.

Type “Mount Vernon police officer” in the patient’s name field, Susan Gregg, Harborview spokeswoman, said.

You can also show your support in the comments below.

Mount Vernon Police Department Facebook Page

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Saturday July 16 – East Precinct Community Picnic

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You are invited to a community picnic with the Seattle Police and the neighborhood surrounding Powell Barnett Park next Saturday, July 16, 1pm to 4pm, at Powell Barnett Park, MLK JR Way, between E Yesler and E Cherry. This is a community policing/fun activity — music, hot dogs and ice cream, entertainment and door prizes.

East Precinct Community Picnic

WHEN: Saturday, July 16, 2016 – 1:00 pm @ 1:00 PM – 4:00 PM
WHERE: Powell Barnett Park
Powell Barnett Park
352 Martin Luther King Jr Way, Seattle, WA 98122

See Event Website

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Mayor Murray addresses police reform and accountability

Mayor Murray addresses police reform and accountability
July 7, 2016 by Office of the Mayor

Today, Mayor Ed Murray delivered the following remarks regarding the deaths of Philando Castile and Alton Sterling, and police reform and accountability:

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As I have said many times before, the issue of race and racism is the greatest challenge we face as a country, particularly as racism impacts the black community.

This week, within 24 hours, two black men, Philando Castile and Alton Sterling were killed by police officers.

I am deeply disturbed by police action resulting in the death of any person. And today my thoughts are with the victims’ families, children, and loved ones during this extremely difficult and sad time.

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I know the black community are walking with a heavy heart and a sense of outrage, injustice and fear. Had Castile or Sterling been white, I believe they would still be here with us today.

Their deaths are two in a long line of tragedies that feed mistrust between communities of color and the police, particularly the mothers, fathers, brothers, sisters and children of black men.

As I have said on the night of the Ferguson grand jury verdict, we cannot let this gulf of mistrust divide us and continue to cause this fear and pain.

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This is why we must get police reform right in Seattle.

The Department of Justice should lead the investigations into these killings.

The shooting deaths of black men at the hands of police have brought the attention of the Department of Justice to many cities across the nation, including our own.

Since I became mayor, this City has been committed to working with the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice and the federal courts to make dramatic reforms in the Seattle Police Department to comply with the federally mandated consent decree.

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In partnership with the Department of Justice and the Federal Monitor that oversees our consent decree, we are creating a model Force Review Board that is being replicated across the country.

The Force Review Board reviews every serious use of force by a Seattle Police Officer. And present at every Force Review Board are representatives from the Department of Justice, the Monitoring Team, a civilian representative from the Office of Professional Accountability, and a citizen observer.

So unlike Minneapolis or Louisiana, the Department of Justice is already here, and we are working with them closely to create best practices in reviewing police uses of force.

Where other jurisdictions are just now contemplating where to start, we are already well down the road of reform, and other cities are coming to us to learn from our experience.

In fact, Chief O’Toole is in D.C. today at the Center of Policing Equity to speak at an event sponsored by the Department of Justice about the issues of race and policing.

In the coming months, I will send legislation to Seattle City Council that will expand and strengthen civilian oversight and independent review of the Seattle Police Department.

It is my goal to create a permanent citizen oversight commission that is the strongest in this city’s history.

It is my goal to create a more independent director of the police accountability process, on the model of the ethics and elections commission, which is completely independent of the mayor and council.

It is my goal to create a stronger auditor of the police discipline process on the model of an inspector general, with greater authority to investigate complaints.

And we will use a community process similar to the one used to hire Chief O’Toole to hire for these new roles.

As we move forward, our conversation cannot be about blaming black men, it must be about changing our institutions and systems.

As a white man, I stand as an ally in solidary with the black community.

But I cannot pretend to know their experience.

I cannot know the experience of black men and women everywhere, who live everyday with the fear that one small action of their part could make them the next victim.

I cannot know the experience of raising a black child in our society, and the daily worry that today might be the day they do not come home because they were taken by a bullet.

What I do know is that white Americans have work to do. We, the beneficiaries of hundreds of years of structural inequality, must use our privilege to construct a more just society.

This has been my commitment every single day as mayor.

Everything we have accomplished during my time in this office…

…pre-k, the minimum wage, transit, priority hire, parks and community centers, police reform, summer youth employment, our education summit…

…they are our response to addressing the issue of race and inequality.

To Seattle’s residents of color, your city cares about you. Your lives matter. The fact that we even need to state that Black Lives Matter is the result of our failure to address racism in our society.

To white residents of Seattle, let us work with our sisters and brothers of color to end structural and institutional racism.”

– See more at: http://murray.seattle.gov/mayor-murray-addresses-police-reform-and-accountability/#sthash.ARaN9TA2.IRKcdSfy.dpuf

Mayor delivers remarks on officer involved shootings
7/7/201631:11

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray delivers remarks on the recent officer involved shootings in Louisiana and Minnesota.

http://www.seattlechannel.org/embedvideoplayer?videoid=x66208

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Guiding Good Choices: Rainier Community Center

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With a focus on prevention, Communities in Action is offering its next Guiding Good Choices workshop beginning Tuesday (6/14) evening at Rainier Community Center (4800 38th Avenue S, Seattle).

This 5-session Guiding Good Choices series will be offered on 6/14, 6/16, 6/21, 6/23, and 6/30 with dinner provided at 5:30 pm.

Parents, grandparents, guardians, coaches and mentors of young people ages 9 – 14 will have a chance to learn and discuss:

-risks facing children today;
-setting guidelines;
-ways to help kids avoid trouble;
-dealing with family conflict
-cool ways to bond with the teens and pre-teens in their lives

With new laws and policies—in our ever changing world—we want to give young people many tools and opportunities.

Attached is a flier to share with clients, coaches, foster parents, friends, grandparents, guardians, mentors, staff, and teachers.

Space is limited.
To register call or text Liletha Williams at:
206.250.0853
lilethasrighthere@yahoo.com

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SAVE A LIFE: WITH THIS APP – ‘PULSEPOINT’

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DOWNLOAD THE PULSEPOINT APP NOW

You know the difference early CPR and defibrillation can make in a Sudden Cardiac Arrest event. Fifty-seven percent of U.S. adults say they’ve had CPR training, and most would be willing to use CPR or an AED to help save a stranger’s life. Yet only 11% say they’ve used CPR in an actual emergency—that’s a number we can increase together.

When that emergency call comes in your team will be ready. But what if someone was already at the scene, applying lifesaving CPR and defibrillation until the EMS team arrived? With PulsePoint, your dispatch system immediately alerts CPR-trained bystanders about a nearby SCA event through the free PulsePoint Respond mobile app, and lets them know the location of the closest AED.

When CPR-trained bystanders receive an alert from PulsePoint Respond, it tells them not only where an SCA event is happening, but also where they can find the nearest AED. But often, data on AED locations can be missing, inaccurate, or simply not detailed enough to make the devices easy to find in an emergency. That’s where the PulsePoint AED app comes in.

With the free PulsePoint AED app, citizens can help even before a life is in danger, by easily identifying public access AEDs throughout your community. Users place the AED location on a map, add business and descriptor information and submit photos of the AED in context of its environment.

PulsePoint

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2016 National Crime Victims’ Rights Week Resource Guide

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See the VIDEO

2016 NCVRW Theme Video: Serving Victims. Building Trust. Restoring Hope

Every year in April, OVC helps lead communities throughout the country in their annual observances of National Crime Victims’ Rights Week (NCVRW), which will be observed in 2016 on April 10–16. This year’s theme—Serving Victims. Building Trust. Restoring Hope.—underscores the importance of early intervention and victim services in establishing trust with victims, which in turn begins to restore their hope for healing and recovery.

This year’s NCVRW Resource Guide highlights how serving victims and building trust restores hope and strengthens communities. The Guide contains a vibrant array of theme artwork that is available for organizations to incorporate into their outreach materials. View the 2016 NCVRW sample proclamation to help inspire the community, raise awareness of victims’ rights, and address unmet needs.