Free Summer Meals and Recreation Activities

Free Summer Meals and Recreation Activities
May 17, 2018 by Christina Hirsch

FREE SUMMER MEALS

This summer, Seattle Parks and Recreation, Seattle Human Services Department, and United Way of King County are partnering to host a drop-in summer program offering free meals and recreation activities. Recreation activities are open for kids and teens ages 1 to 18 and may include arts, crafts, board games, and organized recreational games. A free lunch and snacks will be offered to youth ages 1 to 18. The program will run daily from June 27 to August 24 from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday rain or shine at 19 park sites across Seattle.

2018 Summer Meals and Recreation Field Days locations:

• Beacon Hill Playground: 1902 13th Ave. S
• Beer Sheva Park: 8650 55th Ave. S
• Brighton Playground: 6000 39th Ave. S
• EC Hughes Playground: 7907 30th Ave. SW
• Georgetown Park: 750 S Homer St.
• Greenwood Park: 602 N 87th St.
• Highland Park: 1100 SW Cloverdale St.
• Judkins Playground: 2150 S Norman St.
• Lakewood Playground: 5013 S Angeline St.
• Lakeridge Playground: 10145 Rainier Ave. S
• Little Brook Park: 140th and 32nd Ave. NE
• Madrona Playground: 3211 E Spring St.
• Maplewood Playfield: 4801 Corson Ave. S
• North Acres Park: 12718 1st Ave. NE
• Othello Playground: 4351 S Othello St.
• Peppi’s Playground: 3233 E Spruce St.
• Powell Barnett Park: 352 MLK Jr. Way
• Pratt Park: 1800 S Main St.
• Roxhill Park: 2850 SW Roxbury St.

FREE SUMMER MEALS

For questions or more information about the program, please contact Nicholas Farline, Sr. Recreation Program Specialist at 206-615-0303 or nicholas.farline@seattle.gov.

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Seattle Winter Shelter Dec 22 thru Jan 2018

The City of Seattle


Winter Response

SEVERE WEATHER SHELTER

Seattle Center Exhibition Hall
301 Mercer Street
Seattle, WA 98109
Enter at 7:00 p.m.

Friday Night, December 22nd through
Monday Night January 1st
Exit at 7:00 a.m.

The Severe Weather Shelter serves adults 18 and older
(all genders) and is operated by Salvation Army staff.

Open access, referral forms are NOT required.
Bus Routes Include #3, and Rapid Ride D Line
Weekday Information – 206-684-0231

See more Information

Catholic Community Services Emergency Assistance Program

The Emergency Assistance program helps families, single adults, seniors, and people with disabilities with a variety of emergency and basic needs. Services include:

Rental Assistance and Eviction Prevention
Move-in Assistance
Utility Assistance and Shut-off Prevention
Information & Resource Referral
Short-term Case Management
Emergency Motel Vouchers (families with children under 18 only)
Food Bags and Cards (based on availability)
Bus Tickets (based on availability)
To access services please call the intake line for your geographic area for updated
information and eligibility.

Seattle and South King County:

Seattle and South King County
(253) 850-2523

East King County
(425) 213-1963 x2

Volunteer

1-888-649-6850

Visit the WEBSITE

Seattle Severe Weather Shelter

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Seattle Severe Weather Shelter

Location: Seattle Center Fisher Pavilion, near 2nd & Thomas St. South of Key Arena
Dates open: Saturday night 10/15 & Sunday night 10/16
Time: 7pm to 7am
Capacity: 100 beds
Population: Co-Ed Shelter: 18+, no children
Contact for information: (206) 684-0231

King County Administration Building Shelter & 420 4th Ave Shelter – expanded capacity (50 additional spots in Admin Building)

Location: 500 & 420 4th Avenue Downtown Seattle (Between Jefferson and James) Line up for the shelter in front of the loading dock garage door at the corner of 4th and Jefferson.
Dates open (with expanded capacity): Thursday, 10/13 – Tuesday, 10/18, (Both Admin Shelter & 420 4th Ave open regularly every other night with 50 beds each)
Time: 7pm to 6am
Capacity: 100 beds in Admin, 50 beds at 420 4th Ave
Population: men (pets welcome at 420 shelter)

Seattle City Hall Shelter

Location: 600 4th Ave
Dates open (with expanded capacity): Thursday, 10/13 – Tuesday, 10/18, (Open regularly with 75 beds every other night)
Time: 7pm to 6am
Capacity: 81 beds
Population: men & women
Here are some on the Eastside, too:

Eastside Women’s Winter Shelter
*Note: This shelter is a winter shelter for Women opening for the first night on Saturday, 10/15 and remaining open through much of winter.

Location: Lakeside Christian Church, 701 1st Street, Kirkland, WA 98033
Dates open: Saturday night 10/15 – 1/2/2017
Time: 8:30pm – 7am, 7 days/week
Population: Single Adult Women
Note: Includes Dinner & Breakfast
Contact for information: Cynthia: (425) 463-6285 x 106

Eastside Family Winter Shelter
*Note: This shelter is a winter shelter for families opening for the first night on Saturday, 10/15 and remaining open through much of winter.

Location: Redmond United Methodist Church, 16540 NE 80th St, Redmond, WA 98052
Dates open: Saturday night 10/15 – open all winter
Time: 8:30pm – 7am, 7 days/week
Population: Families
Note: Includes Dinner & Breakfast
Contact for information: Cynthia: (206) 437-7448
In Snoqualmie:

Valley Renewal Center Shelter (Expanding day center to be 24 hour shelter)

Location: 38625 SE River St, Snoqualmie, WA, 98065
Dates open: Friday 10/13 – Monday, 10/17 at 2pm
Time: 24-hour overnight, Dinner and Breakfast Served
Eligibility: Must have a Snoqualmie Valley Connection, Sex offender check, no background check
Population: Single Men; Single Parent Families Headed by Fathers or Mothers; Single Women; Two Parent Families
Contact for information: (425) 505 – 0038

Guiding Good Choices: Rainier Community Center

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With a focus on prevention, Communities in Action is offering its next Guiding Good Choices workshop beginning Tuesday (6/14) evening at Rainier Community Center (4800 38th Avenue S, Seattle).

This 5-session Guiding Good Choices series will be offered on 6/14, 6/16, 6/21, 6/23, and 6/30 with dinner provided at 5:30 pm.

Parents, grandparents, guardians, coaches and mentors of young people ages 9 – 14 will have a chance to learn and discuss:

-risks facing children today;
-setting guidelines;
-ways to help kids avoid trouble;
-dealing with family conflict
-cool ways to bond with the teens and pre-teens in their lives

With new laws and policies—in our ever changing world—we want to give young people many tools and opportunities.

Attached is a flier to share with clients, coaches, foster parents, friends, grandparents, guardians, mentors, staff, and teachers.

Space is limited.
To register call or text Liletha Williams at:
206.250.0853
lilethasrighthere@yahoo.com

Concerning homeless youth prevention and protection.

HB 1436 – 2015-16

Concerning homeless youth prevention and protection.

History of the Bill

Sponsors: Representatives Kagi, Zeiger, Robinson, Walsh, Walkinshaw, Pettigrew, Senn, Johnson, Orwall, Ortiz-Self, Reykdal, Carlyle, Gregerson, Appleton, Fitzgibbon, Ormsby, Clibborn, Jinkins, Bergquist, Goodman, McBride, Pollet, Riccelli, Kilduff
By Request: Governor Inslee
Companion Bill: SB 5404

2015 REGULAR SESSION
Jan 21 First reading, referred to Early Learning & Human Services (Not Officially read and referred until adoption of Introduction report). (View Original Bill)
Feb 4 Public hearing in the House Committee on Early Learning & Human Services at 1:30 PM. (Committee Materials)
Feb 10 Executive action taken in the House Committee on Early Learning & Human Services at 8:00 AM. (Committee Materials)
ELHS – Executive action taken by committee.
ELHS – Majority; 1st substitute bill be substituted, do pass. (View 1st Substitute) (Majority Report)
Minority; do not pass. (Minority Report)
Minority; without recommendation. (Minority Report)
Feb 12 Referred to Appropriations.
Feb 24 Public hearing in the House Committee on Appropriations at 1:30 PM. (Committee Materials)
Feb 26 Executive action taken in the House Committee on Appropriations at 9:00 AM. (Committee Materials)
APP – Majority; 2nd substitute bill be substituted, do pass. (View 2nd Substitute) (Majority Report)
Minority; do not pass. (Minority Report)
Minority; without recommendation. (Minority Report)
Feb 27 Referred to Rules 2 Review.
Mar 3 Placed on second reading by Rules Committee.
Mar 4 2nd substitute bill substituted (APP 15). (View 2nd Substitute)
Rules suspended. Placed on Third Reading.
Third reading, passed; yeas, 62; nays, 36; absent, 0; excused, 0. (View Roll Calls)
IN THE SENATE
Mar 6 First reading, referred to Human Services, Mental Health & Housing.
Mar 24 Public hearing in the Senate Committee on Human Services and Mental Health & Housing at 10:00 AM. (Committee Materials)
Apr 24 By resolution, returned to House Rules Committee for third reading.
2015 1ST SPECIAL SESSION
IN THE HOUSE
Apr 29 By resolution, reintroduced and retained in present status.
2015 2ND SPECIAL SESSION
May 29 By resolution, reintroduced and retained in present status.
2015 3RD SPECIAL SESSION
Jun 28 By resolution, reintroduced and retained in present status.

http://app.leg.wa.gov/billinfo/summary.aspx?year=2015&bill=1436

Asian Counseling and Referral Service (ACRS)

From: http://acrs.org/

Teen Peer Advocate Program

The Teen Peer Advocate Program (TPAP) is comprised of young women offering community education and peer-to-peer support groups for high school girls. Trained teen peer advocates provide education and outreach to other Asian Pacific American youth at area schools, communities and other youth services. The school-based support groups offer a safe space for young women to discuss healthy relationships and prevention of dating violence.

WARNING SIGNS OF DATING VIOLENCE
Your Partner:

Doesn’t want you to have friends, frequently checks up on you
Refuses to break up
Gives orders, makes all the decisions, or doesn’t take your opinions seriously
Makes you worry about how his/her reactions to things you say or do
Threatens you
Owns or uses weapons
Has a history of fighting, quickly loses temper, abuses animals, brags about mistreating others
Gets too serious about the relationship too fast
Abuses alcohol or other drugs, pressures you to take them
Blames you for his/her mistreatment of you, says you provoked him/her
Has a history of troubled relationships, blames previous partners
Causes your family or friends to worry about you or your safety

MY DATING BILL OF RIGHTS*
I have the right to:

Trust myself and my instincts
Ask for a date
Refuse a date
Suggest activities
Refuse any activities, even if my partner is excited about them
Express my opinions and have them respected
Be respected as a person
Disagree
Make mistakes
Change my mind
Have a partner who is faithful
Have my limits respected
Tell my partner I want affection
Refuse affection
Be listened to
Be cared about
Refuse sex with anyone, anytime
Not be hit, slapped or shoved
Not be humiliated in public or private
Break up with someone who hurts me, even if I love him/her
Break up with someone who hurts me, even if they love me
Ask for help if I need it

I have the responsibility to:

Determine my limits
Respect other people’s limits
Communicate clearly and honestly, if it is safe
Take care of myself
Ask for help if I need it

*Adapted from Warning! Dating May Be Hazardous to Your Health!, Mother Courage Press, Racine, WI.

SEATTLE/KING COUNT RESOURCES: **
Abused Deaf Women’s Advocacy Services * TDD 206-726-0093
Asian Counseling and Referral Service * 206-695-7600
Asian Pacific Islander Women & Safety Center * 206-467-9976
Chaya (South Asians) * 206-325-0325 or 1-877-92-CHAYA
Child Protective Services (CPS) * 1-800-609-8764
Children’s Response Center * 425-688-5130
Chinese Information & Service Center * 206-624-5633
Communities Against Rape & Abuse * 206-322-4856
Consejo Counseling Referral Services (Latino/Hispanic) * 206-461-4880
Crisis Clinic * 206-461-3222
Domestic Abuse Women’s Network (DAWN) * 425- 656-STOP (7867)
Eastside Asian Pacific Islanders * 1-877-689-4162
Eastside Domestic Violence (24 hours) * 425-746-1940 or 1-800-827-8840
Harborview Center for Sexual Assault & Traumatic Stress* 206-744-1600
King County Protection Order Advocacy Program * 206-296-9547
King County Sexual Assault & Resource Center * 425- 226-7273
Korean Community Counseling Center * 206-784-5691
New Beginnings (24 hours) * 206-522-9472
NW Network of Bisexual, Trans, Lesbian and Gay Survivors of Abuse * 206-568-7777
Refugee Women’s Alliance (ReWA) * 206-721-0243
Teen Link Hotline * 206-461-4922
WA State Coalition of Sexual Assault Programs * 360-754-7583
WA State Domestic Violence Hotline (24 hours) * 1-800-562-6025
Youth Eastside Services * 425-747-4937
Youthlink * 425-452-5254
YWCA-East Cherry (African Americans) * 206-461-4882

**Compiled by the Teen Peer Advocate Program 2007**

CONTACT INFORMATION:
Please contact (206) 695-7600 and ask for the AP ADVICE Coordinator.
Visit TPAP’s official site at http://www.acrsteenadvocates.org for more information.

Please visit: http://acrs.org/

Asian Counseling and Referral Service (ACRS) is a nationally recognized nonprofit organization offering a broad array of human services and behavioral health programs to Asian Pacific Americans in King County. ACRS is the largest multiservice organization serving all the different Asian Pacific American communities – immigrants, refugees and American born – in the Pacific Northwest.

Community Outreach: United States Attorney’s Office for the Western District of Washington

headDOJ_seal

Community Outreach

The United States Attorney’s Office for the Western District of Washington is committed to effectively serving our community and engages in outreach in order to prevent crime, respond to community needs, and promote good citizenship. Through our outreach efforts, the office connects with local community groups and organizations to discuss ways our work affects them, and provide an avenue for members of the community to express issues of concern and report federal crimes or civil rights violations.

A number of outreach efforts are underway. In concert with the work of our Hate Crimes Task Force, the office is engaged in efforts to reach out to, and more fully engage, members of our Arab, Muslim, and Sikh communities whose members often find themselves targets of hate crimes. In addition, we actively work to address the public safety concerns of our 23 Native American tribes within the Western District of Washington. And we conduct extensive community outreach through law enforcement initiatives such as

Project Safe Childhood, which combats sexual exploitation crimes against children;

Project Safe Neighborhood, which focuses both on arresting and prosecuting serial criminals who illegally use or possess firearms, and assisting communities in addressing issues that, left unchecked, may lead to gun violence; and

The Washington Anti-Trafficking Advisory Committee, which is dedicated to identifying and rescuing trafficking victims, providing social services and immigration relief to victims, and fully investigating and prosecuting traffickers.

Should you have a question about, or wish to participate in, any one of our outreach efforts please call us at 206-553-7970. Executive Assistant U.S. Attorney Thomas Bates directs our outreach efforts and other members of the staff lead specific initiatives, including:

Bruce Miyake, Assistant U.S. Attorney – Hate Crimes Task Force

Jerrod Patterson, Assistant U.S. Attorney – Project Safe Childhood Coordinator

Jill Otake, Assistant U.S. Attorney – Project Safe Neighborhood Coordinator

Susie Roe, Assistant U.S. Attorney – Tribal Outreach Coordinator

Ye-Ting Woo, Assistant U.S. Attorney – Washington Anti-Trafficking Advisory Committee

The U.S. Attorney and Assistant U.S. Attorneys, along with other office staff, regularly speak at community meetings, local events and schools throughout Washington regarding the work of the officeUSAO as well as specific law enforcement or crime prevention issues of interest. To request a guest speaker contact Public Affairs Officer Emily Langlie at Emily.Langlie@usdoj.gov or 206-553-4110.

Seattle Action Network Supports: Self-Sufficiency Project

The Self-Sufficiency Project was a Canadian experiment in the 1990s that provided a “generous, time-limited earnings supplement available to single parents who had been on welfare for a least a year, and who subsequently left welfare and found full-time work.”

The study found that individuals offered a SSP subsidy were four percent more likely to stay on welfare to receive the benefit, but once people qualified for the SSP supplement, 44% left welfare dependence and were employed full-time–defined as working at least 30 hours a week.

The program was interesting since increases in employment boosted payroll and other taxes to a large enough extent that the subsidy paid for itself.

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