The Seattle Police Department’s Strategies for the Future

Plan Overview
The Seattle Police Department has achieved remarkable progress in the eyes of our federal and local government officials, the people of Seattle, and the women and men of the Department. This work began when Mayor Murray took office, and during the past two years has been guided by SPD’s four pillars of policing – Enhance Public Trust, Build Pride and Professionalism, Address Crime and Disorder, and Promote Best Business Practices.

These four principles form the foundation of the Department’s priorities for the next two years, and beyond, outlined in this strategic plan. These objectives are the result of the combined efforts of SPD leadership to develop long term goals to support the delivery of police services in a manner that reflects the values, needs, and expectations of entire City of Seattle.Public trust remains paramount, both in terms of achieving complete compliance with the settlement agreement and maintaining a singular focus on community engagement. As we look toward the next two years, the institutionalization of new modes and measures of supervision and oversight, allow the Department to refocus its efforts on the responsibilities of every day policing – answering calls for assistance.

Download the FULL PDF

Read more FULL PLAN

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Reform advocates upset over pushback over changing malice law

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Members of the legislative task force formed to recommend policy to next year’s Legislature on how to reduce violent interactions involving law enforcement listen Tuesday to executive director Sue Rahr of the state Criminal Justice Training Center during their meeting at the Burien facility. Peter Haley phaley@thenewstribune.com

When an effort by state lawmakers to make prosecuting police for improper use of deadly force easier stalled last year, legislators compromised.

They agreed to let a task force study the issue and recommend policy to next year’s Legislature on how to reduce violent interactions involving law enforcement.

Read more here: http://www.thenewstribune.com/news/politics-government/article92684372.html#storylink=cpy

But some on the state-appointed committee, which had its second meeting Tuesday, say lawmakers overseeing the panel are filibustering even a dialogue about changing controversial state law regulating police use of deadly force.

Read more FULL ARTICLE

Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion

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LEAD (Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion) caseworker Tim Candela, right, attends a LEAD meeting at the SPD West Precinct

From: CapitolHillSeattle

In recent weeks, East Precinct officers have been trained to participate in the Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion program. LEAD now joins the already functioning Multi-Disciplinary Team program on Capitol Hill in giving law enforcement new options and resources for dealing with addiction. Officials are looking at ways the two programs can work together.

According to Public Defender Association director Lisa Daugaard, all East Precinct police officers will be trained to participate in LEAD by the end of the month. Until now only West Precinct officers have been able to recommend people for LEAD participation. There was initial talk of only expanding the program to Capitol Hill, but “Capitol Hill community leaders actually pushed for inclusion of the rest of the precinct on racial justice grounds,” because, according to Daugaard, community leaders felt that parts of the East Precinct with a higher percentage of minorities than Capitol Hill should also benefit from the program. Daugaard said she anticipates that once East Precinct officers have been trained, “there will probably be significantly more referrals” for the LEAD program.

Mayor Ed Murray announced the planned expansion of the MDT and LEAD programs to Capitol Hill in fall 2015. MDT was expanded to Capitol Hill in January, and Metropolitan Improvement District vice president Dave Willard said so far results have been “pretty encouraging.” Outreach workers for MDT joined East Precinct officers on patrols, and now those officers are being trained to do some outreach of their own.

Visit the LEAD website

VOCAL Washington on Seattle Capitol Hill This Week

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From: CapitolHillSeattle

Meanwhile, another potential public health intervention for chronic drug users is making the rounds in Seattle. A mock safe consumption site for drug users set up by VOCAL Washington is making stops on Capitol Hill this week. The site targets users who inject and provides low-threshold access to a supervised space to consume pre-obtained illicit drugs, clean equipment, emergency care in the case of overdoses, and referrals to healthcare and drug treatment services if desired by the user.

On Monday, the site was set up in Cal Anderson from noon to 7 PM. Advocate Ashley Hempelmann said safe consumption sites cut down on transferrals of drug users to hospitals and public disorder. There are no cities in the U.S. currently using safe consumption sites.

VOCAL’s Patricia Sully said the pop-up site in the middle a city park is a way to make it easy for lots of people to learn more about how the resource would work — not demonstrate an actual working consumption site.

Visit VOCAL Washington website

Mayor Murray addresses police reform and accountability

Mayor Murray addresses police reform and accountability
July 7, 2016 by Office of the Mayor

Today, Mayor Ed Murray delivered the following remarks regarding the deaths of Philando Castile and Alton Sterling, and police reform and accountability:

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As I have said many times before, the issue of race and racism is the greatest challenge we face as a country, particularly as racism impacts the black community.

This week, within 24 hours, two black men, Philando Castile and Alton Sterling were killed by police officers.

I am deeply disturbed by police action resulting in the death of any person. And today my thoughts are with the victims’ families, children, and loved ones during this extremely difficult and sad time.

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I know the black community are walking with a heavy heart and a sense of outrage, injustice and fear. Had Castile or Sterling been white, I believe they would still be here with us today.

Their deaths are two in a long line of tragedies that feed mistrust between communities of color and the police, particularly the mothers, fathers, brothers, sisters and children of black men.

As I have said on the night of the Ferguson grand jury verdict, we cannot let this gulf of mistrust divide us and continue to cause this fear and pain.

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This is why we must get police reform right in Seattle.

The Department of Justice should lead the investigations into these killings.

The shooting deaths of black men at the hands of police have brought the attention of the Department of Justice to many cities across the nation, including our own.

Since I became mayor, this City has been committed to working with the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice and the federal courts to make dramatic reforms in the Seattle Police Department to comply with the federally mandated consent decree.

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In partnership with the Department of Justice and the Federal Monitor that oversees our consent decree, we are creating a model Force Review Board that is being replicated across the country.

The Force Review Board reviews every serious use of force by a Seattle Police Officer. And present at every Force Review Board are representatives from the Department of Justice, the Monitoring Team, a civilian representative from the Office of Professional Accountability, and a citizen observer.

So unlike Minneapolis or Louisiana, the Department of Justice is already here, and we are working with them closely to create best practices in reviewing police uses of force.

Where other jurisdictions are just now contemplating where to start, we are already well down the road of reform, and other cities are coming to us to learn from our experience.

In fact, Chief O’Toole is in D.C. today at the Center of Policing Equity to speak at an event sponsored by the Department of Justice about the issues of race and policing.

In the coming months, I will send legislation to Seattle City Council that will expand and strengthen civilian oversight and independent review of the Seattle Police Department.

It is my goal to create a permanent citizen oversight commission that is the strongest in this city’s history.

It is my goal to create a more independent director of the police accountability process, on the model of the ethics and elections commission, which is completely independent of the mayor and council.

It is my goal to create a stronger auditor of the police discipline process on the model of an inspector general, with greater authority to investigate complaints.

And we will use a community process similar to the one used to hire Chief O’Toole to hire for these new roles.

As we move forward, our conversation cannot be about blaming black men, it must be about changing our institutions and systems.

As a white man, I stand as an ally in solidary with the black community.

But I cannot pretend to know their experience.

I cannot know the experience of black men and women everywhere, who live everyday with the fear that one small action of their part could make them the next victim.

I cannot know the experience of raising a black child in our society, and the daily worry that today might be the day they do not come home because they were taken by a bullet.

What I do know is that white Americans have work to do. We, the beneficiaries of hundreds of years of structural inequality, must use our privilege to construct a more just society.

This has been my commitment every single day as mayor.

Everything we have accomplished during my time in this office…

…pre-k, the minimum wage, transit, priority hire, parks and community centers, police reform, summer youth employment, our education summit…

…they are our response to addressing the issue of race and inequality.

To Seattle’s residents of color, your city cares about you. Your lives matter. The fact that we even need to state that Black Lives Matter is the result of our failure to address racism in our society.

To white residents of Seattle, let us work with our sisters and brothers of color to end structural and institutional racism.”

– See more at: http://murray.seattle.gov/mayor-murray-addresses-police-reform-and-accountability/#sthash.ARaN9TA2.IRKcdSfy.dpuf

Mayor delivers remarks on officer involved shootings
7/7/201631:11

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray delivers remarks on the recent officer involved shootings in Louisiana and Minnesota.

http://www.seattlechannel.org/embedvideoplayer?videoid=x66208

Guiding Good Choices: Rainier Community Center

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With a focus on prevention, Communities in Action is offering its next Guiding Good Choices workshop beginning Tuesday (6/14) evening at Rainier Community Center (4800 38th Avenue S, Seattle).

This 5-session Guiding Good Choices series will be offered on 6/14, 6/16, 6/21, 6/23, and 6/30 with dinner provided at 5:30 pm.

Parents, grandparents, guardians, coaches and mentors of young people ages 9 – 14 will have a chance to learn and discuss:

-risks facing children today;
-setting guidelines;
-ways to help kids avoid trouble;
-dealing with family conflict
-cool ways to bond with the teens and pre-teens in their lives

With new laws and policies—in our ever changing world—we want to give young people many tools and opportunities.

Attached is a flier to share with clients, coaches, foster parents, friends, grandparents, guardians, mentors, staff, and teachers.

Space is limited.
To register call or text Liletha Williams at:
206.250.0853
lilethasrighthere@yahoo.com

Lets STOP Child Pornography

Washington’s not-so-little dirty secret
Police ‘overwhelmed’ as state leads the nation in child pornography

From: Seattle PI
Seattlepi.com reporter Levi Pulkkinen

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U.S. Secret Service Special Agent Bryan Molnar, center, led and assisted in dozens of child pornography investigations in the Northwest. He’s pictured above with Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh Johnson

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Cecelia Gregson, a senior deputy prosecutor with the King County Prosecutor’s Office, has recently been pursuing child pornographers in federal court.

“There are some sections of the depictions world that are unimaginable, really, on any level,” said Cecelia Gregson, a state prosecutor who for two years has been hauling some of the Seattle area’s most egregious offenders into federal court.

Read more FULL ARTICLE

Thank you! East Precinct bike officers Chris Myers and Drew Fowler Save a Life

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From: SPD website

As a reminder, Washington law provides immunity from criminal drug possession charges for anyone seeking medical aid for themselves or someone else experiencing an overdose.

Officers Save Another Life With Overdose Reversal Drug

Written by Jonah Spangenthal-Lee on April 28, 2016 12:37 pm

For the second time in as many weeks, Seattle police officers have used a life-saving medication to stop a potentially fatal overdose.

Around 2:30 PM Wednesday, East Precinct bike officers Chris Myers and Drew Fowler were patrol near Broadway and East Pike Street when they spotted a 33-year-old man sprawled on the ground in a doorway.

As officers Meyers and Fowler approached the man, they noticed he was foaming at the mouth and convulsing. The man’s eyes were wide open, but he was unresponsive to officers and did not appear to be breathing.

A witness at the scene told police the man had taken a pill a short time earlier so Officer Myers, believing the man was suffering from an opioid overdose, administered a dose of Naloxone. Moments after receiving the drug, the 33-year-old immediately rolled over and regained consciousness.

Seattle Fire Department medics arrived at the scene but the man declined further treatment and walked away under his own power.

This incident will become part of the University of Washington‘s ongoing study into SPD’s use of Narcan/Naloxone.

SPD Bike officers to be trained and equipped with Nasal Naloxone

Today the Seattle Police Department, together with The Marah Project

East Precinct Officers Now Testing Bodycams

Written by Jonah Spangenthal-Lee on December 23, 2014 11:38 am

Officers in the East Precinct have begun testing of a body-worn video cameras. Here’s our first-ever release of thrilling first-person police video, featuring officers responding to a report of disabled vehicle blocking a sidewalk.

Read more FULL REPORT

Community Outreach: United States Attorney’s Office for the Western District of Washington

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Community Outreach

The United States Attorney’s Office for the Western District of Washington is committed to effectively serving our community and engages in outreach in order to prevent crime, respond to community needs, and promote good citizenship. Through our outreach efforts, the office connects with local community groups and organizations to discuss ways our work affects them, and provide an avenue for members of the community to express issues of concern and report federal crimes or civil rights violations.

A number of outreach efforts are underway. In concert with the work of our Hate Crimes Task Force, the office is engaged in efforts to reach out to, and more fully engage, members of our Arab, Muslim, and Sikh communities whose members often find themselves targets of hate crimes. In addition, we actively work to address the public safety concerns of our 23 Native American tribes within the Western District of Washington. And we conduct extensive community outreach through law enforcement initiatives such as

Project Safe Childhood, which combats sexual exploitation crimes against children;

Project Safe Neighborhood, which focuses both on arresting and prosecuting serial criminals who illegally use or possess firearms, and assisting communities in addressing issues that, left unchecked, may lead to gun violence; and

The Washington Anti-Trafficking Advisory Committee, which is dedicated to identifying and rescuing trafficking victims, providing social services and immigration relief to victims, and fully investigating and prosecuting traffickers.

Should you have a question about, or wish to participate in, any one of our outreach efforts please call us at 206-553-7970. Executive Assistant U.S. Attorney Thomas Bates directs our outreach efforts and other members of the staff lead specific initiatives, including:

Bruce Miyake, Assistant U.S. Attorney – Hate Crimes Task Force

Jerrod Patterson, Assistant U.S. Attorney – Project Safe Childhood Coordinator

Jill Otake, Assistant U.S. Attorney – Project Safe Neighborhood Coordinator

Susie Roe, Assistant U.S. Attorney – Tribal Outreach Coordinator

Ye-Ting Woo, Assistant U.S. Attorney – Washington Anti-Trafficking Advisory Committee

The U.S. Attorney and Assistant U.S. Attorneys, along with other office staff, regularly speak at community meetings, local events and schools throughout Washington regarding the work of the officeUSAO as well as specific law enforcement or crime prevention issues of interest. To request a guest speaker contact Public Affairs Officer Emily Langlie at Emily.Langlie@usdoj.gov or 206-553-4110.