The Seattle Police Department’s Strategies for the Future

Plan Overview
The Seattle Police Department has achieved remarkable progress in the eyes of our federal and local government officials, the people of Seattle, and the women and men of the Department. This work began when Mayor Murray took office, and during the past two years has been guided by SPD’s four pillars of policing – Enhance Public Trust, Build Pride and Professionalism, Address Crime and Disorder, and Promote Best Business Practices.

These four principles form the foundation of the Department’s priorities for the next two years, and beyond, outlined in this strategic plan. These objectives are the result of the combined efforts of SPD leadership to develop long term goals to support the delivery of police services in a manner that reflects the values, needs, and expectations of entire City of Seattle.Public trust remains paramount, both in terms of achieving complete compliance with the settlement agreement and maintaining a singular focus on community engagement. As we look toward the next two years, the institutionalization of new modes and measures of supervision and oversight, allow the Department to refocus its efforts on the responsibilities of every day policing – answering calls for assistance.

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9/11/16 – John T. Williams Memorial Crosswalk

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In conjunction with the Seattle Police Department (SPD), Seattle’s Department of Neighborhoods, Seattle Indian Health Board and the SPD’s Native American Police Advisory Council we invite all media outlets and the community to attend a ground breaking ceremony for a new community crosswalk on the corner of Boren & Howell on Sunday, September 11th at 8 – 9 a.m.

The crosswalk will be in honor of and in the memory of John T. Williams. The crosswalk groundbreaking shall include a cleansing ceremony, the story behind the crosswalk and an opportunity for the press to ask questions of the organizers. The planned crosswalk depicts a Nuu-chah-nulth story about the White Deer. The story of the White Deer shall be read and available in written form for people at the event. Members from the above host organizations and the family of John T. Williams shall be available to answer your questions about the project. Light snacks and coffee will be provided.

We hope that the crosswalk helps people remember the life of John T. Williams, a Nuu-chah-nulth woodcarver. We also hope that the crosswalk also continues the subsequent work done by the Seattle Police Department, the Department of Justice and several members of the American Indian Community to foster positive changes throughout all communities within the City of Seattle and the Seattle Police Department.

Reform advocates upset over pushback over changing malice law

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Members of the legislative task force formed to recommend policy to next year’s Legislature on how to reduce violent interactions involving law enforcement listen Tuesday to executive director Sue Rahr of the state Criminal Justice Training Center during their meeting at the Burien facility. Peter Haley phaley@thenewstribune.com

When an effort by state lawmakers to make prosecuting police for improper use of deadly force easier stalled last year, legislators compromised.

They agreed to let a task force study the issue and recommend policy to next year’s Legislature on how to reduce violent interactions involving law enforcement.

Read more here: http://www.thenewstribune.com/news/politics-government/article92684372.html#storylink=cpy

But some on the state-appointed committee, which had its second meeting Tuesday, say lawmakers overseeing the panel are filibustering even a dialogue about changing controversial state law regulating police use of deadly force.

Read more FULL ARTICLE

Mayor Murray addresses police reform and accountability

Mayor Murray addresses police reform and accountability
July 7, 2016 by Office of the Mayor

Today, Mayor Ed Murray delivered the following remarks regarding the deaths of Philando Castile and Alton Sterling, and police reform and accountability:

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As I have said many times before, the issue of race and racism is the greatest challenge we face as a country, particularly as racism impacts the black community.

This week, within 24 hours, two black men, Philando Castile and Alton Sterling were killed by police officers.

I am deeply disturbed by police action resulting in the death of any person. And today my thoughts are with the victims’ families, children, and loved ones during this extremely difficult and sad time.

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I know the black community are walking with a heavy heart and a sense of outrage, injustice and fear. Had Castile or Sterling been white, I believe they would still be here with us today.

Their deaths are two in a long line of tragedies that feed mistrust between communities of color and the police, particularly the mothers, fathers, brothers, sisters and children of black men.

As I have said on the night of the Ferguson grand jury verdict, we cannot let this gulf of mistrust divide us and continue to cause this fear and pain.

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This is why we must get police reform right in Seattle.

The Department of Justice should lead the investigations into these killings.

The shooting deaths of black men at the hands of police have brought the attention of the Department of Justice to many cities across the nation, including our own.

Since I became mayor, this City has been committed to working with the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice and the federal courts to make dramatic reforms in the Seattle Police Department to comply with the federally mandated consent decree.

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In partnership with the Department of Justice and the Federal Monitor that oversees our consent decree, we are creating a model Force Review Board that is being replicated across the country.

The Force Review Board reviews every serious use of force by a Seattle Police Officer. And present at every Force Review Board are representatives from the Department of Justice, the Monitoring Team, a civilian representative from the Office of Professional Accountability, and a citizen observer.

So unlike Minneapolis or Louisiana, the Department of Justice is already here, and we are working with them closely to create best practices in reviewing police uses of force.

Where other jurisdictions are just now contemplating where to start, we are already well down the road of reform, and other cities are coming to us to learn from our experience.

In fact, Chief O’Toole is in D.C. today at the Center of Policing Equity to speak at an event sponsored by the Department of Justice about the issues of race and policing.

In the coming months, I will send legislation to Seattle City Council that will expand and strengthen civilian oversight and independent review of the Seattle Police Department.

It is my goal to create a permanent citizen oversight commission that is the strongest in this city’s history.

It is my goal to create a more independent director of the police accountability process, on the model of the ethics and elections commission, which is completely independent of the mayor and council.

It is my goal to create a stronger auditor of the police discipline process on the model of an inspector general, with greater authority to investigate complaints.

And we will use a community process similar to the one used to hire Chief O’Toole to hire for these new roles.

As we move forward, our conversation cannot be about blaming black men, it must be about changing our institutions and systems.

As a white man, I stand as an ally in solidary with the black community.

But I cannot pretend to know their experience.

I cannot know the experience of black men and women everywhere, who live everyday with the fear that one small action of their part could make them the next victim.

I cannot know the experience of raising a black child in our society, and the daily worry that today might be the day they do not come home because they were taken by a bullet.

What I do know is that white Americans have work to do. We, the beneficiaries of hundreds of years of structural inequality, must use our privilege to construct a more just society.

This has been my commitment every single day as mayor.

Everything we have accomplished during my time in this office…

…pre-k, the minimum wage, transit, priority hire, parks and community centers, police reform, summer youth employment, our education summit…

…they are our response to addressing the issue of race and inequality.

To Seattle’s residents of color, your city cares about you. Your lives matter. The fact that we even need to state that Black Lives Matter is the result of our failure to address racism in our society.

To white residents of Seattle, let us work with our sisters and brothers of color to end structural and institutional racism.”

– See more at: http://murray.seattle.gov/mayor-murray-addresses-police-reform-and-accountability/#sthash.ARaN9TA2.IRKcdSfy.dpuf

Mayor delivers remarks on officer involved shootings
7/7/201631:11

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray delivers remarks on the recent officer involved shootings in Louisiana and Minnesota.

http://www.seattlechannel.org/embedvideoplayer?videoid=x66208

SPOTLIGHT: North Precinct Captain Sean O’Donnell

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PRECINCT CAPTAIN SEAN O’DONNELL

Sean O’Donnell
Captain Sean O’Donnell began his career with the Seattle Police Department in 1981. He has worked in the all of the precincts as a police officer and was a Field Training Officer. In 1986 he transferred to the Seattle Police Traffic Section as a motorcycle officer for six years. He has been assigned as a Media Relations Officer, Industrial Relations Officer, academy instructor, and was assigned as a Detective on the Mayor’s Security Detail. He was promoted to Sergeant in 2001.

As a Sergeant he worked Patrol in the West and North Precincts. He also worked in positions as a Sergeant in Communications and as a Detective Sergeant in the Office of Professional Accountability. When promoted to Lieutenant in 2006 he was assigned as a Watch Commander in the South Precinct. He has been assigned to successive positions as the East Precinct Operations Lieutenant, a West Precinct Watch Commander, and the West Precinct Operations Lieutenant.

Captain O’Donnell was promoted to Captain in 2011, and was assigned as Director for the SPD 911 Communications Section. He most recently served as commander of the Seattle Police Education and Training Section, where he and his staff worked with the federally appointed Monitoring Team and Department of Justice to “operationalize” recently changed department polices into training curriculums, which were delivered to all of the sworn members of the organization.

Captain O’Donnell received an Associate’s Degree in Criminal Justice from Shoreline Community College and a Bachelor of Arts degree in Criminal Justice from Central Washington University. He retired in 2004 from the active/reserve U.S. Army after 24 years, attaining the rank of Command Sergeant Major. He is a graduate of the U.S. Army Sergeants Major Academy. Captain O’Donnell has completed several leadership and management courses including the Senior Management Institute For Police (SMIP), the WACJTC Leadership in Police Organizations (LPO) course, and the 2013 and 2014 Summer Criminal Justice Executive Leadership Institute co-sponsored by CJTC and Seattle University. He has received certification as a Middle Manager from the Washington State Criminal Justice Training Commission.

Captain O’Donnell understands the need for strong community relationships. He believes in working collaboratively with citizens, businesses, service providers and law enforcement partners to work successfully towards the SPD Mission:

“It is the mission of the Seattle Police Department to address crime and improve quality of life through the delivery of constitutional and effective police services, and to do so in a way that reflects the values of our diverse neighborhoods.”

Captain O’Donnell was born in Seattle and was raised in northeast area of the city. He and his wife are the parents of two daughters.

Corner Story: SPD Sgt. Balances Homeless Outreach With City’s Laws

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Written by Andrew Garber on November 5, 2014 12:26 pm
Sergeant Paul Gracy isn’t a landlord. He can’t charge rent, demand security deposits or, generally speaking, evict unwanted tenants.

Yet he still has to figure out what to do with Russell, a seemingly permanent fixture on the sidewalks near Denny Way and Aurora Avenue. “He’s been living there for four years,” Gracy says, walking toward Russell’s abode.

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Russell, wearing a black sleeveless T-shirt with “Sugar Mama needed” scrawled on the front, sees Gracy and waves, a smoldering cigarette in hand. He knows what’s coming next – a request to move. “I’m doing what I can to stay out of trouble,” he tells the sergeant.

It’s the first step of an old dance. Russell and Gracy have all the moves down. If police force Russell from one spot, he just moves to another. Arrests are a last resort because jail time does little. He’ll come straight back. “We got human services out and they put him in a motel. It solved my problem for two weeks,” Gracy says, “until he started having guests. So he’s back.”

Seattle has hundreds of people like Russell living downtown on sidewalks, in parks, and under bridges. Mayor Ed Murray, in his 2015-16 budget, has proposed spending an additional $3 million over the next two years to rapidly rehouse people who end up homeless and create additional capacity at homeless shelters, among other measures.

Gracy and his community police team at the West Precinct mix with the homeless daily, urging them to go to shelters, asking them to move. They prod them to seek help from friends, family, social services and query them about mental health and drug problems.

The team, which has six officers including Gracy, has to balance the needs of a vulnerable population of homeless people downtown with laws that dictate where they can and can’t hang out. The officers also must respond to concerns raised by tourists, businesses and other city residents who fear for their safety.

Read more FULL REPORT

East Precinct Officers Now Testing Bodycams

Written by Jonah Spangenthal-Lee on December 23, 2014 11:38 am

Officers in the East Precinct have begun testing of a body-worn video cameras. Here’s our first-ever release of thrilling first-person police video, featuring officers responding to a report of disabled vehicle blocking a sidewalk.

Read more FULL REPORT

Community Outreach: United States Attorney’s Office for the Western District of Washington

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Community Outreach

The United States Attorney’s Office for the Western District of Washington is committed to effectively serving our community and engages in outreach in order to prevent crime, respond to community needs, and promote good citizenship. Through our outreach efforts, the office connects with local community groups and organizations to discuss ways our work affects them, and provide an avenue for members of the community to express issues of concern and report federal crimes or civil rights violations.

A number of outreach efforts are underway. In concert with the work of our Hate Crimes Task Force, the office is engaged in efforts to reach out to, and more fully engage, members of our Arab, Muslim, and Sikh communities whose members often find themselves targets of hate crimes. In addition, we actively work to address the public safety concerns of our 23 Native American tribes within the Western District of Washington. And we conduct extensive community outreach through law enforcement initiatives such as

Project Safe Childhood, which combats sexual exploitation crimes against children;

Project Safe Neighborhood, which focuses both on arresting and prosecuting serial criminals who illegally use or possess firearms, and assisting communities in addressing issues that, left unchecked, may lead to gun violence; and

The Washington Anti-Trafficking Advisory Committee, which is dedicated to identifying and rescuing trafficking victims, providing social services and immigration relief to victims, and fully investigating and prosecuting traffickers.

Should you have a question about, or wish to participate in, any one of our outreach efforts please call us at 206-553-7970. Executive Assistant U.S. Attorney Thomas Bates directs our outreach efforts and other members of the staff lead specific initiatives, including:

Bruce Miyake, Assistant U.S. Attorney – Hate Crimes Task Force

Jerrod Patterson, Assistant U.S. Attorney – Project Safe Childhood Coordinator

Jill Otake, Assistant U.S. Attorney – Project Safe Neighborhood Coordinator

Susie Roe, Assistant U.S. Attorney – Tribal Outreach Coordinator

Ye-Ting Woo, Assistant U.S. Attorney – Washington Anti-Trafficking Advisory Committee

The U.S. Attorney and Assistant U.S. Attorneys, along with other office staff, regularly speak at community meetings, local events and schools throughout Washington regarding the work of the officeUSAO as well as specific law enforcement or crime prevention issues of interest. To request a guest speaker contact Public Affairs Officer Emily Langlie at Emily.Langlie@usdoj.gov or 206-553-4110.

Public Safety, Civil Rights, and Technology Committee (4/22/14, 6:00 pm)

Public Safety, Civil Rights, and Technology Committee (4/22/14, 6:00 pm)

Published by Bruce Harrell at 10:09 am under Public Safety, Civil Rights, And Technology Committee

Joint Meeting Of The Public Safety, Civil Rights, And Technology Committee & Labor Committee Agenda for Wednesday, 4/22/2014, 6:00 PM

Click here to view the complete agenda:

1. Presentations by the Office of Professional Accountability Review Board (OPARB), the Community Police Commission (CPC), and the Office of Professional Accountability (OPA) Civilian Auditor

BRIEFING AND DISCUSSION (30 minutes, to 6:30 p.m.)
Presenters: Elizabeth Holohan, OPARB; Lisa Daugaard and Diane Narasaki, CPC; Judge Anne Levinson (ret.), OPA Civilian Auditor

2. PUBLIC HEARING on the effectiveness of the City’s Police Accountability System pursuant to Ordinance 122809

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