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Seattle Police stocking up on opioid overdose medicine – EVENT! SAT AUGUST 31, 2019

Eight cities in Washington will host events for Overdose Awareness Day, Saturday.

The Seattle Police Department has ordered 145 more doses of naloxone, the opioid overdose medicine, to be distributed across their five precincts. Read More

According to the National Safety Council, there were 61,311 preventable drug overdoses in the country in 2017.

Of those, more than 43,000 involved opioids.

For more information of the efforts in Washington state to stop overdoses, click here.

August 31, Seattle
Who: VOCAL Washington

What: Resilience, Remembrance and Healing. An event to create a space that holds people that are grieving and also increases awareness of the issue of overdose and what can be done to prevent them. Naloxone distribution and overdose prevention training.

Where: Occidental Park, 117 South Washington Street, Seattle, WA 98104

When: August 31, 2019, 2:00 p.m.- 4:00 p.m.

Contact: info@vocal-wa.org

Overdose Awareness Day Events 2019

August 21, Mount Vernon
Who: Pioneer Counseling/Phoenix Recovery Services. Skagit County

What: Overdose Awareness Event, Awareness Walk at 5:00 p.m. Free NARCAN, overdose response trainings, food, music, tribute board, resource booth.

Where: Cleveland Park, 1401 Cleveland Street, Mount Vernon, WA, 98273

When: August 21, 2019. 5:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.

Contact: (360) 848-8437

August 28, Yakima
Who: Triumph Treatment Services

What: “Time to Remember. Time to Act”. Memorial wall to honor those who were lost due to an overdose. Attendees are encouraged to bring photos of loved ones impacted or lost, and to stand in solidarity with friends and families of fatal overdose victims.

Where: Franklin Park. 410 S 19th Ave, Yakima, WA, 98902

When: August 28, 2019, 3:00 p.m. – Dusk

Contact: Triumph Treatment Services (509) 571-1455

August 28, Belfair
Who: Mason County

What: “Mason County Overdose Awareness Month”. Overdose awareness walk, resources, treatment providers, naloxone distribution and overdose response training.

Where: North Mason Timberland Library. 23081 NE State Route 3, Belfair, WA 98528

When: August 28, 2019, 4:00 p.m. till 7:00 p.m. Awareness walk starts at 6:00 p.m.

Contact: Abe Gardner (360) 463-2238

August 29, Shelton
Who: Mason County

What: “Mason County Overdose Awareness Month”. Overdose awareness walk, resources, treatment providers, naloxone distribution and overdose response training.

Where: Kneeland Park, West Railroad Ave, Shelton, WA 98584

When: August 29, 2019, 4:00 p.m. till 7pm. Awareness walk starts at 6:00 p.m.

Contact: Abe Gardner (360) 463-2238

August 31, Vancouver
Who: Clark County Public Health, Southwest Washington Accountable Community of Health, and Clark County Opioid Task Force

What: Opioid overdose intervention training with the overdose prevention drug, Naloxone. A limited supply of free Naloxone kits will be available at the event. RSVP for overdose intervention training: https://sw_wa_opioid_awareness_day_2019.eventbrite.com

There will also be the third annual Southwest Washington Overdose Awareness Day candlelight vigil from 6-8pm, no RSVP needed.

Where: Marshall Community Center, 1009 E McLoughlin Blvd, Vancouver, WA 98663

When: August 31, 2019. Overdose prevention training 4:00 to 6:00 p.m., Candlelight Vigil 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.

Contact: jim.jensen@southwestach.org

September 5, Everett
Who: Snohomish County Overdose Prevention

What: “A Night to Remember, A Time to Act.” Resource fair, speakers, candlelight vigil, attendees are encouraged to bring photos of loved ones lost to overdose or impacted by drug use.

Where: Snohomish County Campus, 3000 Rockefeller Ave, #5, Everett, WA, 98201

When: September 5, 2019. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Doors open at 6pm, indoor resource fair 6:30-7:30 p.m. 7:30 p.m. move outside for speakers and candlelight vigil.

Contact: https://www.facebook.com/events/342389723365852/

September 6, Okanogan
Who: Okanogan County Public Health

What: An event to remember friends and family affected by overdose. We will offer resources, including overdose response training and naloxone distribution.

Where: Okanogan County Public Health 1234 2nd Ave South, Okanogan, WA 98840

When: September 6, 2019. 6230-4:30 p.m.

Contact: (509) 422-7140

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BEWARE: Fentanyl overdose deaths up 70 percent in Wash., health officials say

Photo from Public Health Seattle & King County shows pills containing fentanyl that were sold on the streets of Seattle.

OLYMPIA, Wash. – The number of people who died from an overdose of illicit fentanyl increased nearly 70 percent this year over last in Washington state, health officials said Wednesday.


NARCAN SPRAY

Read more HERE

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Public libraries and YMCAs to get Narcan to prevent opioid overdoses


Narcan, that drug meant to help prevent an opioid overdose, is becoming more readily available.

Seattle police carry it. It’s available at CVS and Walgreens without a prescription. And now, it’s going to be available at thousands of public libraries and YMCAs nationwide.

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Every day, 115 people in the U.S. die because of opioid overdoses.

Read more <HERE

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Prison Reform and Redemption Act 2018

LIVE: President Donald Trump Delivers Remarks At Prison Reform Summit – May 18, 2018 | CNBC

Summary: H.R.3356 — 115th Congress (2017-2018)All Information (Except Text)
There is one summary for H.R.3356. Bill summaries are authored by CRS.

Introduced in House (07/24/2017)
Prison Reform and Redemption Act

This bill directs the Department of Justice to develop the Post-Sentencing Risk and Needs Assessment System for use by the Bureau of Prisons (BOP) to assess prisoner recidivism risk; guide housing, grouping, and program assignments; and incentivize and reward participation in and completion of recidivism reduction programs and productive activities.

It amends the federal criminal code to:

require the BOP to implement the Post-Sentencing Risk and Needs Assessment System;
establish prerelease custody procedures for prisoners who, among other things, earn time credits for successfully completing recidivism reduction programs or productive activities;
prohibit, subject to specified exceptions, the use of restraints on federal prisoners who are pregnant or in postpartum recovery; and
broaden the duties of probation and pretrial services officers to include court-directed supervision of sex offenders conditionally released from civil commitment.
The BOP must:

incorporate de-escalation techniques into its training programs;
report on its ability to treat heroin and opioid abuse through medication-assisted treatment;
establish pilot programs on youth mentorship and service to abandoned, rescued, or vulnerable animals; and
designate a release preparation coordinator at each facility that houses prisoners.
The bill prohibits monitoring the contents of an electronic communication between a prisoner at a BOP facility and the prisoner’s attorney.

It amends the Second Chance Act of 2007 to reauthorize through FY2022 and modify eligibility criteria for an elderly offender early release pilot program.

Lieutenant Osvaldo Albarati Correctional Officer Self-Protection Act of 2017

The bill amends the federal criminal code to require the BOP to allow federal correctional officers to securely store and carry concealed firearms on BOP premises outside the security perimeter of a prison.

Read more HERE

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Flashback – Naloxone: Seattle Police Officers Revive Drug Overdose Victim

Original Published on May 23, 2017

Police responded to a report of a man down in the 1500 block of 9th Avenue just before midnight and were quickly flagged down by a woman. The woman pointed officers to a man lying on the sidewalk, and said he had recently used heroin.

Officer Jared Levitt and Sergeant Dave Hockett saw the 40-year-old man was struggling to breathe and gave him a dose of nasal naloxone and began CPR a short time later.

SFD medics arrived and took over treatment of the man, who regained consciousness and was taken to Harborview Medical Center for treatment.

This incident marks the 16th time officers have used Naloxone since Seattle police began carrying it in mid-March. The case will become part of the ongoing study conducted by the University of Washington into SPD’s use of Naloxone for a possible department-wide deployment.

As a reminder, Washington law provides immunity from criminal drug possession charges for anyone seeking medical aid for themselves or someone else experiencing an overdose.

See the Video

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What is Neighborhood Watch?

The National Neighborhood Watch – A Division of the National Sheriffs’ Association Official Statement
National Neighborhood Watch (formerly USAonWatch) does not advocate watch members taking any action when observing suspicious activity in their neighborhood. Community members only serve as the extra “eyes and ears” and should report their observations of suspicious activities to their local law enforcement. Trained law enforcement should be the only ones ever to take action; citizens should never try to take action on those observations. National Neighborhood Watch (formerly USAonWatch) encourages all watch groups to register with our national database where multiple resources are made available to assist in the training and maintaining of Neighborhood Watch groups and its members.

For more information on how and when to report suspicious activity please refer to the Neighborhood Watch Manual

What is Neighborhood Watch?
In essence, Neighborhood Watch is a crime prevention program that stresses education and common sense (Stegenga 2000). It teaches citizens how to help themselves by identifying and reporting suspicious activity in their neighborhoods. In addition, it provides citizens with the opportunity to make their neighborhoods safer and improve the quality of life. Neighborhood Watch groups typically focus on observation and awareness as a means of preventing crime and employ strategies that range from simply promoting social interaction and “watching out for each other” to active patrols by groups of citizens (Yin, et al., 1976).

Most neighborhood crime prevention groups are organized around a block or a neighborhood and are started with assistance from a law enforcement agency. Volunteers who donate their time and resources are typically at the center of such programs, since many do not have a formal budget or source of funding. One study (Garofalo and McLeod, 1988) found that most Neighborhood Watches were located in areas that contained high percentages of single-family homes, little or no commercial establishments, and residents who had lived at their current address for more than five years. This study also found that most of the programs used street signs to show the presence of the program to potentially deter any would-be criminals.

All Neighborhood Watches share one foundational idea: that bringing community members together to reestablish control of their neighborhoods promotes an increased quality of life and reduces the crime rate in that area. As Rosenbaum (1988) put it “. . . if social disorganization is the problem and if traditional agents of social control no longer are performing adequately, we need to find alternative ways to strengthen informal social control and to restore a ‘sense of neighborhood'”. That’s precisely what Neighborhood Watch strives to do. In fact, from the earliest attempts to deal with the neighborhood structure as it relates to crime (through the Chicago Area Project of the early 1900s), to modern attempts at neighborhood crime prevention, collective action by residents has proved one of the most effective strategies.

The reason for this effectiveness is rather simple: Involving community members in watch programs decreases opportunities for criminals to commit crime rather than attempting to change their behavior or motivation.

Today’s Neighborhood Watch Program is an effective means of crime control and neighborhood cohesiveness. While not all of the programs in place today go by the same name, they all accomplish the same goal: to bring community members together to fight crime. As Minor aptly wrote, “Neighborhood is the key to maintaining successful relationships.”

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Meth, the Forgotten Killer, Is Back. And It’s Everywhere

PORTLAND, Ore. — They huddled against the biting wind, pacing from one corner to another hoping to score heroin or pills. But a different drug was far more likely to be on offer outside the train station downtown, where homeless drug users live in tents pitched on the sidewalk.

“Everybody has meth around here — everybody,” said Sean, a 27-year-old heroin user who hangs out downtown and gave only his first name. “It’s the easiest to find.”

The scourge of crystal meth, with its exploding labs and ruinous effect on teeth and skin, has been all but forgotten amid national concern over the opioid crisis. But 12 years after Congress took aggressive action to curtail it, meth has returned with a vengeance.

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Deputy Daniel McCartney, Pierce County Sheriff's Department, seattle police department, spd, tacoma

Public urged to line procession route for fallen Pierce Co. Sheriff’s Deputy

Public urged to line procession route for fallen Pierce Co. Sheriff’s Deputy

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TACOMA, Wash. – The public is urged to line the procession route on Wednesday as law enforcement escort the body of fallen Pierce County Sheriff’s Deputy Daniel McCartney to a memorial service at Pacific Lutheran University in Tacoma.

“Please come out – we can’t put into words how much it means to the family and to all of the first responders who will be participating in the memorial,” the Sheriff’s office wrote in a message on their Facebook Page.

The procession will begin around 11:00 a.m. at the North Gate of Joint Base Lewis-McChord.

The Sherrif’s office said the procession will then follow this route:

Leave Joint Base Lewis-McChord North Gate
East on 112th Street S.
South on Steele Street S.
East on Cross-Base Highway (State Route 704)
North on Pacific Avenue
West on Tule Lake Road S.
North on Yamika Avenue S.
West on 124th Street S.
Arrive at Pacific Lutheran University
The procession is set to arrive at PLU’s Olson Auditorium at 11:45 a.m.

The memorial is open to the public but parking won’t be available on site.

For those who would like to attend to attend, parking will be available at the Church of All Nations located at 111 112th Street E. in Tacoma. Shuttle service will leave the church and head the PLU campus starting at 11:15 a.m.

The memorial is set to begin at 1:00 p.m.

Govenor Jay Inslee has also ordered all state agencies to lower Washington state and U.S. flags to half-staff on Wednesday in honor of Deputy McCartney.

RELATED | New Pierce County Sheriff’s K9 named after fallen deputy Daniel McCartney

McCartney was shot and killed on Jan. 7 while investigating a home-invasion burglary in Frederickson. He is survived by a wife and three young sons.

A legacy fund that has been set up to help McCartney’s family. Donations can be made at any Tapco or TwinStar Credit Union or online through Tacoma/Pierce County Crime Stoppers.

Read more here