addiction, addicts, cocaine, cpr, crime, crime prevention, drug overdose, drug use, drunk drivers, dui, education, families, Fentanyl, food banks, gun violence, guns, heroin, homeless, homeless children, housing, illegals, mass shootings, mental health, mental illness, Naloxone, narcan, opioid, overdose, police abuse, politics, school shootings, seattle action network, seattle city council, Seattle Fire Department, seattle housing, Seattle Indian Health Board, seattle police department, seattle public library, Soldier Suicide, teens, trans, united way, veterans, volunteer, youth violence

Two-Part Mental Health First Aid Training Workshop

Two-Part Mental Health First Aid Training Workshop

Event date: Monday, Aug 12, 2019 –
9:30 am to 3:00 pm

Location: NewHolly
Address: New Holly Gathering Hall
7054 32nd Ave S
Seattle, WA

Attendees welcome:
All tenants – SHA housing residents and Housing Choice Voucher holders
Attendee Age: Adult – Age 18 and older

Description:
Trainers from Valley Cities Mental Health will teach attendees to identify and understand common signs of mental illness and substance abuse. They will also coach how to interact with a person in crisis and how to connect them with trained professionals who can help them through this difficult time.

The two-part workshop will take place on Monday, August 12th and Wednesday, August 14th from 9:30am to 3:00pm. You must attend both days.

Training is free for SHA residents and lunch is provided both days.

Contact Ellen Ziontz at (206) 239-1625, eziontz@seattlehousing.org or Dean McBee at (206) 491-7830, deanmcbee1@gmail.com to reserve your spot.

Supporting programs: Valley Cities Mental Health

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Officials: Call 2-1-1 to help people find shelter from cold and ice

Severe Weather Winter Shelters List Here

Outreach teams from King County and the City of Seattle are on patrol around downtown and parts of Capitol Hill to help people on the streets get out of the cold. You can help by dialing 2-1-1.

The King County Emergency Services Patrol, funded by the county and the city, is “operating 24/7 during the weekend to help people who are living on the streets in downtown Seattle” and “out meeting with people who are experiencing homelessness to encourage them to come inside during the winter storm.”

But you can also help out by calling 2-1-1 to let the outreach teams know about somebody who may need help.

You can also call 9-1-1 but reports from some callers say that the emergency dispatchers haven’t treated the shelter shuttle calls as priorities.

The county and the city have increased available shelters and warming facilities through the recent storms and into next week. A roster of severe weather shelters is here.

Read more Capitol Hill Seattle Blog

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Seattle Office for Civil Rights at the 2018 RSJI Summit at Seattle Center

Deadline for registration for the summit and all workshops is
Friday, October 19th, 2018

DESCRIPTION

Please join the Seattle Office for Civil Rights at the 2018 RSJI Summit at Seattle Center for two days, October 23rd-24th, of in-depth workshops, art, and presentations about The State of Race and Justice in Seattle.

We will explore the history of RSJI in Seattle City government; offer resources for race and social justice work; discuss race, racism, and the struggle of our communities for racial equity; and acknowledge the historical harm of systemic and institutional racism.

The RSJI Summit will bring together city departments, community artists, educators, youth, organizers, friends, and faily in the spirit of collective organization and healing.

City of Seattle employees:

Please register via Cornerstone https://bit.ly/2OFZNA8

Please register for the following workshops:

Awaken the Lion Day 1 (Yoga, only 15 spots available per session):
Morning Session: Oct. 23rd 8:30 am-9:30 pm
Link to register:https://www.eventbrite.com/e/rsji-summit-2018-internalized-racial-oppression-for-poc-tickets-50888195964?aff=original

Afternoon Session: Oct. 23rd 1:00 pm-3:00 pm
Link to register: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/rsji-summit-2018-awaken-the-lion-yogaday-1-pm-tickets-50930270811?aff=affiliate1

Diamond Body Gentle Yoga Day 2 (only 15 spots available per session):
Yoga classes centered on people of color.

Morning session: Oct. 24th 8:30 am-9:30 am
Link to register: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/rsji-summit-2018-diamond-body-gentle-yoga-day-2-am-tickets-50761050669?aff=affiliate1

Afternoon session: Oct. 24th 1:00 pm-3:00 pm
Link to register: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/rsji-summit-2018-diamond-body-gentle-yoga-day-2-pm-tickets-50761241239?aff=affiliate1

The Power of Eunioa: Internalized Racial Oppression (Only 40 spots available per session):
There will seperate workshops based on how you racially identify:

For People of Color: Oct. 23rd 9:45 am-4:30 pm
Link to register:https://www.eventbrite.com/e/rsji-summit-2018-internalized-racial-oppression-for-poc-tickets-50888195964?aff=original

For White Allies: Oct. 23rd 9:45 am-4:30 pm
Link to register: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/rsji-summit-2018-internalized-racial-oppression-for-white-allies-tickets-50890096649?aff=original

Change Teams Round Table: A Unified Approach to RSJI Across Seattle:
Armory Loft 3/4: Oct. 24th 1:00 pm-4:30 pm

Link to register: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/rsji-summit-2018-change-teams-round-table-day-2-tickets-50924006073?aff=original

Deadline for registration for the summit and all workshops is
Friday, October 19th, 2018.

Questions: Email iman.ibrahim@seattle.gov

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October 15, 2018 – Seattle Neighborhood Business District Safety Forum

OCT 15 Seattle Neighborhood Business District Safety Forum
by SODO BIA
Free

Actions and Detail Panel

REGISTER

drugs addicts in south tel aviv

Event Information

DESCRIPTION
The BIAs of Ballard, Chinatown/International District, University District, Pioneer Square, and SODO are collaborating in our efforts to engage with city, county, and state officials to address the increasing challenges our businesses are experiencing with drug dealers/users, public disorder, threatening behaviors and crime toward our customers and employees.

We want to invite you to attend a constructive conversation with our elected officials about the problems and solutions to our public safety concerns.

Questions? Email us at: info@sodoseattle.org

Agenda:

1. Facilitator Introductions – 5 minutes

2. BIA Panel Presentation – 40 minutes

What BIAs are doing
Crime Stats
Business, employee, and customer concerns
BIA request for action
3. City, County, State responses – 40 minutes

Enforcement
Prosecution
Services
4. Public Comment – 30 minutes

5. Conclusion and Next Steps – 10 minutes

REGISTER

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Prison Reform and Redemption Act 2018

LIVE: President Donald Trump Delivers Remarks At Prison Reform Summit – May 18, 2018 | CNBC

Summary: H.R.3356 — 115th Congress (2017-2018)All Information (Except Text)
There is one summary for H.R.3356. Bill summaries are authored by CRS.

Introduced in House (07/24/2017)
Prison Reform and Redemption Act

This bill directs the Department of Justice to develop the Post-Sentencing Risk and Needs Assessment System for use by the Bureau of Prisons (BOP) to assess prisoner recidivism risk; guide housing, grouping, and program assignments; and incentivize and reward participation in and completion of recidivism reduction programs and productive activities.

It amends the federal criminal code to:

require the BOP to implement the Post-Sentencing Risk and Needs Assessment System;
establish prerelease custody procedures for prisoners who, among other things, earn time credits for successfully completing recidivism reduction programs or productive activities;
prohibit, subject to specified exceptions, the use of restraints on federal prisoners who are pregnant or in postpartum recovery; and
broaden the duties of probation and pretrial services officers to include court-directed supervision of sex offenders conditionally released from civil commitment.
The BOP must:

incorporate de-escalation techniques into its training programs;
report on its ability to treat heroin and opioid abuse through medication-assisted treatment;
establish pilot programs on youth mentorship and service to abandoned, rescued, or vulnerable animals; and
designate a release preparation coordinator at each facility that houses prisoners.
The bill prohibits monitoring the contents of an electronic communication between a prisoner at a BOP facility and the prisoner’s attorney.

It amends the Second Chance Act of 2007 to reauthorize through FY2022 and modify eligibility criteria for an elderly offender early release pilot program.

Lieutenant Osvaldo Albarati Correctional Officer Self-Protection Act of 2017

The bill amends the federal criminal code to require the BOP to allow federal correctional officers to securely store and carry concealed firearms on BOP premises outside the security perimeter of a prison.

Read more HERE

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Saturday April 30 – The Mayor’s Education Summit Garfield High School Seattle, WA

The Mayor’s Education Summit

Mayor Edward B. Murray’s Education Summit builds on the City’s existing partnership with Seattle Public Schools to address the disparity in educational opportunity and outcomes that disproportionately impact students of color and those from lower-income families. Community voices and local leaders will share what’s working well in our schools, where more support is needed, and what strategies the City should support to help all students succeed in Seattle’s schools.

“Perhaps the greatest challenge we face in addressing the opportunity gap is the persistent disparities in our public schools,” said Mayor Murray. “This is not just the responsibility of the Seattle school district. All of us have a responsibility to support the success of these students. These children are our children and we must not fail them.”

In the weeks leading up to the summit, the City, Seattle schools, and several community agencies will co-host a series of Community Conversations all over the city to gather ideas and comments about various issues in education from Seattle’s families, students, and communities.

The Mayor’s Education Summit will also be an opportunity to report on the ideas and comments collected at the Community Conversations.

After this event, the Education Summit Advisory Group, comprised of education and community advocates, educators, and business and philanthropic leaders, will help develop recommendations and action items about how the City can best align its resources and efforts around making education more equitable.

Timeline

9:00 am – Arrival and registration
9:30 am – Summit program begins
12:00pm – Lunch
3:15 pm – Closing remarks
3:30 pm – Resource fair

Additional agenda details can be found at:
http://www.seattle.gov/educationsummit

Read more FULL REPORT
Discussion

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Seattle Urban League ‘Career Bridge’ Program

find-a-job-after-theyre-released-from-prison

Please visit the Seattle Urban League Website

Career Bridge Overview

Career Bridge began in 2012, following a spate of gun violence and deaths in Seattle. Career Bridge was initially developed and piloted as a collaborative effort between the City of Seattle and community partners to address the disproportionate rates of violence and trauma research showed to be experienced by men of color, particularly African American men. Career Bridge was created to connect African-American men and other men of color who experience multiple barriers to employment, education and training with jobs, and other necessary support. Originally managed jointly by the City of Seattle’s Office of Economic Development and Human Services Department, Career Bridge was developed through an ongoing partnership with community sponsors and supporters (a network of formal and informal groups with strong ties and existing relationships within the community).

This innovative and community-driven model recognizes and builds on the strengths of existing community networks. Strong personal relationships, grassroots implementation and participant empowerment through shared leadership and accountability differentiate Career Bridge from other services provided to its target population. The Career Bridge Program model brings together workforce training, social services, as well as grassroots community support networks in order to provide a relevant and comprehensive approach to assist participants attain the abilities and skills needed to achieve short-term economic and personal stability. Using a cohort model, individuals enter and progress through Career Bridge as a group.

Participants benefit from the mutual motivation, encouragement and collaborative learning that occurs within a cohort model.

Participants’ peers also become an important part of their network of support.

Class description

Classes are 80 hours (classes times: 12:30pm – 4:30pm, Monday through Friday)
Participants will receive 6 college credits through South Seattle College and a student ID# upon completion for continuing education.
$75 stipends paid to each participant per week for attendance.
There will be 2 days in each curriculum set aside for Community partners.
Job development services offered to Career Bridge participants through multiple resources.
Increased computer lab days to strengthen resume, cover letter, and online job search.
Increased training at Monroe Correctional Facility including work with Work Force development in prisons.

We understand that the best solution to crime prevention is a job. Career Bridge is the answer.

Click here to apply and call for an appointment at (206) 461-3792 Ext 3036.

Current Class Schedule

Start date—August 31st through September 25th
Class times—12:30PM to 4:30PM; Monday through Friday.
Computer lab days: Sep 7, 10, and 18.
All other days to be conducted in the open class room.
Total students 10-12 per class.

Graduation date: Tuesday, Sept 29th (held at Damascus Baptist Church Lower Banquet Room)

Program Model

Community Sponsors and Supporters: A key element of Career Bridge is the expectation that participants are referred by people who are well acquainted with them and committed to ongoing mentoring, leadership development, and problem solving support throughout the process.

Wrap-Around Support: Career Bridge recognizes the importance of and therefore helps facilitate participant’s connection to resources to address basic needs (i.e. food, transportation, housing, etc.), wrap services (i.e. childcare, utility assistance, etc.) and unsolved trauma (i.e. healthy relationships, mental health, substance use/abuse, etc.).

Employment & Career Training & Assistance: Career Bridge incorporates assistance with job readiness, job search, training, and labor market information. The program model facilitates ongoing assistance with job placement and connections to training needed for good-paying jobs that provide a pathway to long-term careers.

Support The Urban League Today!

The Urban League of Metropolitan Seattle is a nonprofit recognized as tax-exempt under Section 501(c)(3) of the United States Internal Revenue Code. Your donation is tax-deductible for U.S. tax purposes under Section 170 of the Code.
Donate Now

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Creating a task force on poverty

images

HB 2113 – 2015-16

Creating a task force on poverty.

History of the Bill
as of Wednesday, January 6, 2016 2:11 PM

Sponsors: Representatives Walkinshaw, Walsh, Kagi, Johnson, Appleton, Sawyer, Kilduff, Stanford, Jinkins, Zeiger, Santos, Ortiz-Self, Pollet, Ormsby

2015 REGULAR SESSION
Feb 13 First reading, referred to Early Learning & Human Services (Not Officially read and referred until adoption of Introduction report). (View Original Bill)
Feb 18 Public hearing in the House Committee on Early Learning & Human Services at 1:30 PM. (Committee Materials)
Feb 20 Executive action taken in the House Committee on Early Learning & Human Services at 10:00 AM. (Committee Materials)
ELHS – Majority; 1st substitute bill be substituted, do pass. (View 1st Substitute) (Majority Report)
Referred to Rules 2 Review.
2015 1ST SPECIAL SESSION
Apr 29 By resolution, reintroduced and retained in present status.
2015 2ND SPECIAL SESSION
May 29 By resolution, reintroduced and retained in present status.
2015 3RD SPECIAL SESSION
Jun 28 By resolution, reintroduced and retained in present status.

http://app.leg.wa.gov/billinfo/summary.aspx?year=2015&bill=2113

aids, hiv, politics, teens, veterans

Cured of HIV: A Community Q & A with Timothy Ray Brown & Gero Hütter Thursday, February 26, 2015

timbrown

Cured of HIV: A Community Q & A with Timothy Ray Brown & Gero Hütter Thursday, February 26, 2015, 6 – 8 p.m.

Event type Library Program
Where Central Library
Room Location Level 4 – Room 1 – Washington Mutual Foundation Meeting Room
Audience Adults
Language English
Summary Join us for a Q & A session with Timothy Ray Brown, the first person cured of HIV, and Gero Hütter, the doctor who cured him.
Description Seattle native Timothy Ray Brown (aka “The Berlin patient”) is the first person in the world cured of HIV. Brown and Gero Hütter, the doctor who cured him, will be in Seattle for a moderated question and answer session for you to meet and ask questions. Hütter, M.D., Ph.D. will share his experiments that led to this cure and Brown will share his inspiring personal story.

Recently profiled in the New Yorker article, “Can AIDS Be Cured?,” the research at the heart of Timothy Ray Brown’s remarkable recovery is all the more fascinating and relevant as scientists continue to seek out new therapies and approaches to curing or controlling HIV/ AIDS.

As a result of his experience, Brown launched in October 2014 The Cure for AIDS Coalition, a public benefit corporation whose sole mission is to find a cure for HIV.
Notes Library events and programs are free and everyone is welcome. Registration is not required.

This program is hosted in association with the defeat HIV Community Advisory Board, the University of Washington Center for AIDS Research, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and UW AIDS Clinical Trials Unit. For more on The Cure for AIDS Coalition, visit The Cure AIDS Report.
Recorded for Podcast This event will be recorded for future podcast.
Contact Info *Central Library 206-386-4636 or Ask a Librarian

Read more FULL REPORT

bruce harrell, Office of Professional Accountability, opa, paul gracy, pierre davis, politics, seattle action network, seattle police department, spd, technology, veterans, workplace

Corner Story: SPD Sgt. Balances Homeless Outreach With City’s Laws

sgtgracy1

Written by Andrew Garber on November 5, 2014 12:26 pm
Sergeant Paul Gracy isn’t a landlord. He can’t charge rent, demand security deposits or, generally speaking, evict unwanted tenants.

Yet he still has to figure out what to do with Russell, a seemingly permanent fixture on the sidewalks near Denny Way and Aurora Avenue. “He’s been living there for four years,” Gracy says, walking toward Russell’s abode.

gracywithhomeless

Russell, wearing a black sleeveless T-shirt with “Sugar Mama needed” scrawled on the front, sees Gracy and waves, a smoldering cigarette in hand. He knows what’s coming next – a request to move. “I’m doing what I can to stay out of trouble,” he tells the sergeant.

It’s the first step of an old dance. Russell and Gracy have all the moves down. If police force Russell from one spot, he just moves to another. Arrests are a last resort because jail time does little. He’ll come straight back. “We got human services out and they put him in a motel. It solved my problem for two weeks,” Gracy says, “until he started having guests. So he’s back.”

Seattle has hundreds of people like Russell living downtown on sidewalks, in parks, and under bridges. Mayor Ed Murray, in his 2015-16 budget, has proposed spending an additional $3 million over the next two years to rapidly rehouse people who end up homeless and create additional capacity at homeless shelters, among other measures.

Gracy and his community police team at the West Precinct mix with the homeless daily, urging them to go to shelters, asking them to move. They prod them to seek help from friends, family, social services and query them about mental health and drug problems.

The team, which has six officers including Gracy, has to balance the needs of a vulnerable population of homeless people downtown with laws that dictate where they can and can’t hang out. The officers also must respond to concerns raised by tourists, businesses and other city residents who fear for their safety.

Read more FULL REPORT