BLS REVIEW: EMPLOYMENT AND UNEMPLOYMENT AMONG YOUTH — SUMMER 2016

Employment and Unemployment Among Youth Summary
For release 10:00 a.m. (EDT) Wednesday, August 17, 2016 USDL-16-1687

Technical information: (202) 691-6378 * cpsinfo@bls.gov * http://www.bls.gov/cps
Media contact: (202) 691-5902 * PressOffice@bls.gov

EMPLOYMENT AND UNEMPLOYMENT AMONG YOUTH — SUMMER 2016

From April to July 2016, the number of employed youth 16 to 24 years old increased by
1.9 million to 20.5 million, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. This
year, 53.2 percent of young people were employed in July, little changed from a year
earlier. (The month of July typically is the summertime peak in youth employment.)
Unemployment among youth rose by 611,000 from April to July 2016, compared with an
increase of 654,000 for the same period in 2015. (Because this analysis focuses on the
seasonal changes in youth employment and unemployment that occur each spring and summer,
the data are not seasonally adjusted.)

Labor Force

The youth labor force–16- to 24-year-olds working or actively looking for work–grows
sharply between April and July each year. During these months, large numbers of high
school and college students search for or take summer jobs, and many graduates enter
the labor market to look for or begin permanent employment. This summer, the youth
labor force grew by 2.6 million, or 12.4 percent, to a total of 23.1 million in July.
(See table 1.)

The labor force participation rate for all youth was 60.1 percent in July, little
changed from a year earlier. (The labor force participation rate is the proportion
of the civilian noninstitutional population that is working or looking and available
for work.) (See table 2.) The summer labor force participation rate of youth has held
fairly steady since July 2010, after trending downward for the prior two decades. The
summer youth labor force participation rate peaked at 77.5 percent in July 1989.

The July 2016 labor force participation rate for 16- to 24-year-old men was 62.4
percent, higher than the rate for young women at 57.7 percent. The rates for men and
women were little changed from last July. Whites had the highest youth labor force
participation rate in July 2016 at 62.7 percent. The rate was 53.8 percent for Blacks,
43.1 percent for Asians, and 56.2 percent for Hispanics. The rate for Blacks declined
by 2.6 percentage points from last July, while the rates for Whites, Asians, and
Hispanics showed little or no change.

Employment

In July 2016, there were 20.5 million employed 16- to 24-year-olds, little changed
from the summer before. Between April and July 2016, the number of employed youth
rose by 1.9 million. The employment-population ratio for youth in July 2016–the
proportion of the 16- to 24-year-old civilian noninstitutional population with a
job–was 53.2 percent, little changed from the year before. (See tables 1 and 2.)

The July 2016 employment-population ratios for young men (54.9 percent), women (51.5
percent), Whites (56.5 percent), Blacks (42.7 percent), Asians (38.8 percent), and
Hispanics (49.8 percent) showed little or no change from last July.

In July 2016, the largest percentage of employed youth worked in the leisure and
hospitality industry (25 percent), which includes food services. An additional 18
percent of employed youth worked in the retail trade industry, and 13 percent worked
in education and health services. (See table 3.)

Unemployment

The youth unemployment rate (11.5 percent) and the number of unemployed youth (2.6
million) in July 2016 were little changed from a year earlier. Of those 2.6 million
unemployed 16- to 24-year-olds, 1.9 million were looking for full-time work in July
2016, down 222,000 from July 2015. (See tables 1 and 2.)

The July 2016 unemployment rates for young men (12.0 percent), women (10.8 percent),
Whites (9.9 percent), Blacks (20.6 percent), Asians (10.0 percent), and Hispanics
(11.3 percent) also showed little or no change from last July. (See table 2.)

EMPLOYMENT AND UNEMPLOYMENT AMONG YOUTH — SUMMER 2016

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Department of Justice to Launch Inaugural National Heroin and Opioid Awareness Week

goj-seattle-action-network

Department of Justice to Launch Inaugural National Heroin and Opioid Awareness Week

Attorney General Lynch will Travel to Lexington, Kentucky as Part of the Justice Department’s Awareness Campaign to Address the Rising Public Health Crisis of Drug Addiction

The Obama Administration is announcing a “week of action” to raise awareness about the rising public health crisis caused by drug overdoses. As part of this effort, the Department of Justice designated the week of Sept.18-23, 2016, as National Heroin and Opioid Awareness Week. Senior Department of Justice officials, members of the President’s Cabinet and other federal agencies will hold events focused on the work being done to address the national prescription opioid and heroin epidemic.

Attorney General Loretta E. Lynch will travel to Lexington, Kentucky on TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2016, to hold a youth town hall at a local high school; meet with parents who have lost their children due to overdoses and now belong to the Heroin Education Action Team (H.E.A.T.); and deliver a policy speech regarding the actions and resources the Justice Department is bringing to bear on this issue.

“The heroin and opioid epidemic is one of the most urgent law enforcement and public health challenges facing our country,” said Attorney General Lynch. “Through National Heroin and Opioid Awareness Week, the Department of Justice seeks to raise awareness and prevent new victims from succumbing to addiction; to highlight the department’s ongoing commitment to holding accountable traffickers and others responsible for this epidemic; and to help provide treatment to those grappling with addiction. To be successful in this important endeavor, we need the help of all our federal, tribal, state and local partners. In the months ahead, we will continue working to erase this scourge from our communities and to ensure a brighter future for all Americans.”

Read more FULL REPORT

Reform advocates upset over pushback over changing malice law

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Members of the legislative task force formed to recommend policy to next year’s Legislature on how to reduce violent interactions involving law enforcement listen Tuesday to executive director Sue Rahr of the state Criminal Justice Training Center during their meeting at the Burien facility. Peter Haley phaley@thenewstribune.com

When an effort by state lawmakers to make prosecuting police for improper use of deadly force easier stalled last year, legislators compromised.

They agreed to let a task force study the issue and recommend policy to next year’s Legislature on how to reduce violent interactions involving law enforcement.

Read more here: http://www.thenewstribune.com/news/politics-government/article92684372.html#storylink=cpy

But some on the state-appointed committee, which had its second meeting Tuesday, say lawmakers overseeing the panel are filibustering even a dialogue about changing controversial state law regulating police use of deadly force.

Read more FULL ARTICLE

Saturday July 16 – East Precinct Community Picnic

spd-july16

You are invited to a community picnic with the Seattle Police and the neighborhood surrounding Powell Barnett Park next Saturday, July 16, 1pm to 4pm, at Powell Barnett Park, MLK JR Way, between E Yesler and E Cherry. This is a community policing/fun activity — music, hot dogs and ice cream, entertainment and door prizes.

East Precinct Community Picnic

WHEN: Saturday, July 16, 2016 – 1:00 pm @ 1:00 PM – 4:00 PM
WHERE: Powell Barnett Park
Powell Barnett Park
352 Martin Luther King Jr Way, Seattle, WA 98122

See Event Website

Mayor Murray addresses police reform and accountability

Mayor Murray addresses police reform and accountability
July 7, 2016 by Office of the Mayor

Today, Mayor Ed Murray delivered the following remarks regarding the deaths of Philando Castile and Alton Sterling, and police reform and accountability:

police-shooting

As I have said many times before, the issue of race and racism is the greatest challenge we face as a country, particularly as racism impacts the black community.

This week, within 24 hours, two black men, Philando Castile and Alton Sterling were killed by police officers.

I am deeply disturbed by police action resulting in the death of any person. And today my thoughts are with the victims’ families, children, and loved ones during this extremely difficult and sad time.

police-black-lives-matter

I know the black community are walking with a heavy heart and a sense of outrage, injustice and fear. Had Castile or Sterling been white, I believe they would still be here with us today.

Their deaths are two in a long line of tragedies that feed mistrust between communities of color and the police, particularly the mothers, fathers, brothers, sisters and children of black men.

As I have said on the night of the Ferguson grand jury verdict, we cannot let this gulf of mistrust divide us and continue to cause this fear and pain.

police-lives-matter

This is why we must get police reform right in Seattle.

The Department of Justice should lead the investigations into these killings.

The shooting deaths of black men at the hands of police have brought the attention of the Department of Justice to many cities across the nation, including our own.

Since I became mayor, this City has been committed to working with the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice and the federal courts to make dramatic reforms in the Seattle Police Department to comply with the federally mandated consent decree.

Dallas-Police-

In partnership with the Department of Justice and the Federal Monitor that oversees our consent decree, we are creating a model Force Review Board that is being replicated across the country.

The Force Review Board reviews every serious use of force by a Seattle Police Officer. And present at every Force Review Board are representatives from the Department of Justice, the Monitoring Team, a civilian representative from the Office of Professional Accountability, and a citizen observer.

So unlike Minneapolis or Louisiana, the Department of Justice is already here, and we are working with them closely to create best practices in reviewing police uses of force.

Where other jurisdictions are just now contemplating where to start, we are already well down the road of reform, and other cities are coming to us to learn from our experience.

In fact, Chief O’Toole is in D.C. today at the Center of Policing Equity to speak at an event sponsored by the Department of Justice about the issues of race and policing.

In the coming months, I will send legislation to Seattle City Council that will expand and strengthen civilian oversight and independent review of the Seattle Police Department.

It is my goal to create a permanent citizen oversight commission that is the strongest in this city’s history.

It is my goal to create a more independent director of the police accountability process, on the model of the ethics and elections commission, which is completely independent of the mayor and council.

It is my goal to create a stronger auditor of the police discipline process on the model of an inspector general, with greater authority to investigate complaints.

And we will use a community process similar to the one used to hire Chief O’Toole to hire for these new roles.

As we move forward, our conversation cannot be about blaming black men, it must be about changing our institutions and systems.

As a white man, I stand as an ally in solidary with the black community.

But I cannot pretend to know their experience.

I cannot know the experience of black men and women everywhere, who live everyday with the fear that one small action of their part could make them the next victim.

I cannot know the experience of raising a black child in our society, and the daily worry that today might be the day they do not come home because they were taken by a bullet.

What I do know is that white Americans have work to do. We, the beneficiaries of hundreds of years of structural inequality, must use our privilege to construct a more just society.

This has been my commitment every single day as mayor.

Everything we have accomplished during my time in this office…

…pre-k, the minimum wage, transit, priority hire, parks and community centers, police reform, summer youth employment, our education summit…

…they are our response to addressing the issue of race and inequality.

To Seattle’s residents of color, your city cares about you. Your lives matter. The fact that we even need to state that Black Lives Matter is the result of our failure to address racism in our society.

To white residents of Seattle, let us work with our sisters and brothers of color to end structural and institutional racism.”

– See more at: http://murray.seattle.gov/mayor-murray-addresses-police-reform-and-accountability/#sthash.ARaN9TA2.IRKcdSfy.dpuf

Mayor delivers remarks on officer involved shootings
7/7/201631:11

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray delivers remarks on the recent officer involved shootings in Louisiana and Minnesota.

http://www.seattlechannel.org/embedvideoplayer?videoid=x66208

Saturday April 30 – The Mayor’s Education Summit Garfield High School Seattle, WA

The Mayor’s Education Summit

Mayor Edward B. Murray’s Education Summit builds on the City’s existing partnership with Seattle Public Schools to address the disparity in educational opportunity and outcomes that disproportionately impact students of color and those from lower-income families. Community voices and local leaders will share what’s working well in our schools, where more support is needed, and what strategies the City should support to help all students succeed in Seattle’s schools.

“Perhaps the greatest challenge we face in addressing the opportunity gap is the persistent disparities in our public schools,” said Mayor Murray. “This is not just the responsibility of the Seattle school district. All of us have a responsibility to support the success of these students. These children are our children and we must not fail them.”

In the weeks leading up to the summit, the City, Seattle schools, and several community agencies will co-host a series of Community Conversations all over the city to gather ideas and comments about various issues in education from Seattle’s families, students, and communities.

The Mayor’s Education Summit will also be an opportunity to report on the ideas and comments collected at the Community Conversations.

After this event, the Education Summit Advisory Group, comprised of education and community advocates, educators, and business and philanthropic leaders, will help develop recommendations and action items about how the City can best align its resources and efforts around making education more equitable.

Timeline

9:00 am – Arrival and registration
9:30 am – Summit program begins
12:00pm – Lunch
3:15 pm – Closing remarks
3:30 pm – Resource fair

Additional agenda details can be found at:
http://www.seattle.gov/educationsummit

Read more FULL REPORT
Discussion

May 5 – Youth 16-24 Seattle Opportunity & Job Fair !

worktogether
Your Future Starts Here Seattle & King County.

Are you between 16 and 24 and not in school or working?

More than 30 national and local companies want to hire you!

Register now!

Hundreds of Interviews & On the Spot Offers –
Register TODAY to guarantee your interview!

When: May 5th, 9 am to 4 pm – Come for most of the day or just a few hours

Where: CenturyLink Field Event Center, 1000 Occidental Ave, Seattle, WA 98134

What: Seattle Opportunity & Job Fair – Access everything you need to help with your job search or education

Meet and interview with more than 30 companies
Practice your interview skills with one-on-one coaching
Create or improve your resume with personalized support
Get help with job applications
Learn about options to complete high school and explore college
Tap into legal resources for youth involved with the justice system or interested in immigration services
Find a mentor, a job training program, and much more!
FREE FOOD!

Looking for a ride to the Opportunity Fair? Lyft is providing up to $50 of ride share credit for registered attendees who are new users and over 18 years old. Click here to get your ride code! Under 18 or not a new user to Lyft? Bus passes will also be available at the fair.

Follow the 100,000 Opportunities Initiative on Facebook or Twitter for updates. You’ll also find great tools to help you get ready at http://www.startsomewhere.org.

Looking for a flyer about the fair? Click here to download.

More than 30 major companies to host youth opportunity job fair in Seattle

youth jobs

On May 5, more than 30 major companies will host a hiring fair for youth at CenturyLink Field Event Center. The job fair is part of the 100,000 Opportunities Initiative, a coalition of top U.S. companies that is expanding its national youth hiring movement to Seattle. Together, they will interview hundreds of 16-24 year olds from King County who are disconnected from employment and education in an effort to connect them with meaningful job opportunities and a pathway to success.

Interested candidates are invited to register for free and pre-schedule their interviews for the May 5 event at http://www.100kOpportunities.org/Seattle.

The Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act

workforce1

The Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (the Opportunity Act) was signed by President Obama on July 22, 2014 after passing Congress with broad bipartisan support. The Opportunity Act reauthorizes and amends the Workforce Investment Act (1998) through important workforce system reforms.

The Opportunity Act empowers local areas and private sector-led workforce boards with the responsibility of developing a strategic, integrated plan that supports economic growth and labor force needs intended to grow the capacity and performance of the workforce system. Local Workforce Development Boards are required to develop a four-year plan that describes the strategies, programs, and activities they will carry out to implement the Opportunity Act.

The WDC has developed an action plan for Program Years 2016-2020 based on considerations of local workforce needs and thoughtful contributions from partners and stakeholders. The goals and objectives identified entail collaboration across the full span of the workforce development system and utilize the breadth of the system’s assets and expertise.

After many months of planning and community engagement, we are proud to present to you the 2016-2020 Seattle-King County Workforce Development Plan. The WDC welcomes comments and input. Per the guidelines, the plan will be available for public comment until May 31, 2016.

Please view the plan on the WDC website here: http://www.seakingwdc.org/local-workforce-plan-input

Danielle Wallace | Project Manager – Policy
Workforce Development Council of Seattle-King County
2003 Western Avenue, Suite 250 | Seattle, WA 98121
dwallace@seakingwdc.org |206-448-0474 x 3002

Please view the plan on the WDC website here: http://www.seakingwdc.org/local-workforce-plan-input

2016 National Crime Victims’ Rights Week Resource Guide

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See the VIDEO

2016 NCVRW Theme Video: Serving Victims. Building Trust. Restoring Hope

Every year in April, OVC helps lead communities throughout the country in their annual observances of National Crime Victims’ Rights Week (NCVRW), which will be observed in 2016 on April 10–16. This year’s theme—Serving Victims. Building Trust. Restoring Hope.—underscores the importance of early intervention and victim services in establishing trust with victims, which in turn begins to restore their hope for healing and recovery.

This year’s NCVRW Resource Guide highlights how serving victims and building trust restores hope and strengthens communities. The Guide contains a vibrant array of theme artwork that is available for organizations to incorporate into their outreach materials. View the 2016 NCVRW sample proclamation to help inspire the community, raise awareness of victims’ rights, and address unmet needs.