addiction, addicts, cocaine, cpr, crime, crime prevention, drug overdose, drug use, drunk drivers, dui, education, families, Fentanyl, food banks, gun violence, guns, heroin, homeless, homeless children, housing, illegals, mass shootings, mental health, mental illness, Naloxone, narcan, opioid, overdose, police abuse, politics, school shootings, seattle action network, seattle city council, Seattle Fire Department, seattle housing, Seattle Indian Health Board, seattle police department, seattle public library, Soldier Suicide, teens, trans, united way, veterans, volunteer, youth violence

Two-Part Mental Health First Aid Training Workshop

Two-Part Mental Health First Aid Training Workshop

Event date: Monday, Aug 12, 2019 –
9:30 am to 3:00 pm

Location: NewHolly
Address: New Holly Gathering Hall
7054 32nd Ave S
Seattle, WA

Attendees welcome:
All tenants – SHA housing residents and Housing Choice Voucher holders
Attendee Age: Adult – Age 18 and older

Description:
Trainers from Valley Cities Mental Health will teach attendees to identify and understand common signs of mental illness and substance abuse. They will also coach how to interact with a person in crisis and how to connect them with trained professionals who can help them through this difficult time.

The two-part workshop will take place on Monday, August 12th and Wednesday, August 14th from 9:30am to 3:00pm. You must attend both days.

Training is free for SHA residents and lunch is provided both days.

Contact Ellen Ziontz at (206) 239-1625, eziontz@seattlehousing.org or Dean McBee at (206) 491-7830, deanmcbee1@gmail.com to reserve your spot.

Supporting programs: Valley Cities Mental Health

addiction, addicts, aids, black youth, bruce harrell, capitol hill seattle, central district, cocaine, cpr, crime, crime prevention, drug overdose, drug use, drugs, election, employment, Fentanyl, gun violence, guns, heroin, hiv, homeless, housing, king county sheriffs department, medic one, medic two, mental health, mental illness, Naloxone, narcan, nicklesville, opioid, overdose, paramedic, Pierce County Sheriff's Department, seattle action network, seattle city council, seattle police department, seattle public library, shelters, sheriffs, south seattle, spd, teens, veterans, winter shelters

Public libraries and YMCAs to get Narcan to prevent opioid overdoses


Narcan, that drug meant to help prevent an opioid overdose, is becoming more readily available.

Seattle police carry it. It’s available at CVS and Walgreens without a prescription. And now, it’s going to be available at thousands of public libraries and YMCAs nationwide.

drugs addicts in south tel aviv

Every day, 115 people in the U.S. die because of opioid overdoses.

Read more <HERE

addiction, addicts, aids, black youth, bruce harrell, bullying, burglary, capitol hill seattle, central district, cocaine, cpr, crime, crime prevention, drug overdose, drugs, education, Fentanyl, food banks, gun violence, guns, heroin, hiv, homeless children, housing, immigration, jenny durkan, kshama sawant, medic, medic one, mental health, Mike O'Brien, Naloxone, narcan, nicklesville, opa, opioid, overdose, paramedic, politics, prowlers, school safety tips, seattle action network, seattle city council, Seattle Indian Health Board, seattle police department, seattle public library, sexual assault, shelters, sheriffs, spd, spd blotter, teens, veterans, victims, volunteer, winter shelters, youth violence

October 15, 2018 – Seattle Neighborhood Business District Safety Forum

OCT 15 Seattle Neighborhood Business District Safety Forum
by SODO BIA
Free

Actions and Detail Panel

REGISTER

drugs addicts in south tel aviv

Event Information

DESCRIPTION
The BIAs of Ballard, Chinatown/International District, University District, Pioneer Square, and SODO are collaborating in our efforts to engage with city, county, and state officials to address the increasing challenges our businesses are experiencing with drug dealers/users, public disorder, threatening behaviors and crime toward our customers and employees.

We want to invite you to attend a constructive conversation with our elected officials about the problems and solutions to our public safety concerns.

Questions? Email us at: info@sodoseattle.org

Agenda:

1. Facilitator Introductions – 5 minutes

2. BIA Panel Presentation – 40 minutes

What BIAs are doing
Crime Stats
Business, employee, and customer concerns
BIA request for action
3. City, County, State responses – 40 minutes

Enforcement
Prosecution
Services
4. Public Comment – 30 minutes

5. Conclusion and Next Steps – 10 minutes

REGISTER

day labor, education, employment, hiring, internerships, job, job fairs, jobs, seattle action network, seattle public library, summer jobs, summer work, technology, teens, wmbe, Work, workforce, workplace

Port Jobs: Annie E. Casey Foundation Grants $6 Million!

Annie E. Casey Foundation Grants $6 Million!

Port Jobs has been awarded workforce pathway funding as part of the $6 million Annie E. Casey Foundation Generation Work Initiative.

The initiative’s focus is to identify effective ways to connect low-income young adults ages 18-29 with training opportunities and jobs within the maritime, construction and advanced manufacturing industries. The ultimate goal is to develop reproducable programs which help unemployed young people build careers and develop skills that employers need.

“These young adults are facing some of the greatest obstables to living wage careers,” says Heather Worthley, Executive Director of Port Jobs. “This is an exciting opportunity for Port Jobs to join SkillUp Washington partners in creating pathways connecting employers with the next generation of skilled workers.”

Read more PORT JOBS

internment camps, racism, seattle japanese, seattle public library

LESSONS FROM WORLD WAR II: ENDURING LEGACIES OF JAPANESE AMERICAN INCARCERATION

LESSONS FROM WORLD WAR II: ENDURING LEGACIES OF JAPANESE AMERICAN INCARCERATION Sunday, October 23, 2016, 12:30 – 1:30 p.m.

internment2

Event type Author Readings/Lectures
Where Central Library
Room Location Level 1 – Microsoft Auditorium
Audience Adults
Language English

internment1

Summary A panel of scholars in Japanese American history discusses racial profiling during World War II and current racialized politics. Presented in partnership with Densho.

Description It’s been nearly 75 years since 120,000 people of Japanese heritage were imprisoned as a result of racist wartime hysteria. It took decades for the U.S. Government to acknowledge their wrongdoing and Americans are still coming to terms with this black mark on our nation’s history. In this panel, three leading scholars of Japanese American history will discuss the circumstances that lead to incarceration and its bearing on current events, including racial profiling of American Muslims and the racialized politics on display in the current election cycle.

Panelists:

Karen M. Inouye is the author of “The Long Afterlife of Nikkei Wartime Incarceration” (Stanford University Press, October 2016). She is Assistant Professor of American Studies at Indiana University, Bloomington.

Greg Robinson is professor of history at Université du Québec À Montréal. He is the author of “The Great Unknown: Japanese American Sketches” (University Press of Colorado, September 2016) as well as author and editor of several notable books on Japanese Americans, including “A Tragedy of Democracy,” which was awarded the history book prize of the Association for Asian American Studies; “After Camp,” winner of the Caroline Bancroft History Prize in Western US History, and “By Order of the President.”

Lon Kurashige is the author of “Two Faces of Exclusion: The Untold History of Anti-Asian Racism in the United States” (University of North Carolina Press, September 2016). He is associate professor of history at the University of Southern California.

The panel will be moderated by Brian Niiya, Densho Content Director, who edits the Densho Encyclopedia and is the author of the “Encyclopedia of Japanese American History.”

Densho’s mission is to preserve the testimonies of Japanese Americans who were unjustly incarcerated during World War II before their memories are extinguished. They offer these irreplaceable firsthand accounts, coupled with historical images and teacher resources, to explore principles of democracy and promote equal justice for all. Densho is a Japanese term meaning “to pass on to the next generation,” or to leave a legacy.

Notes Library events and programs are free and everyone is welcome. Registration is not required. Parking is available in the Central Library garage for the weekend rate of $7.

This event is supported by The Seattle Public Library Foundation, author series sponsor Gary Kunis, and media sponsor The Seattle Times and presented in partnership with Densho. Books will be available for purchase from Elliott Bay Book Co. at the event.

Recorded for Podcast This event will be recorded for future podcast.

Contact Info *Central Library 206-386-4636 or Ask a Librarian
Room Capacity Space is limited at library events. Please come early to make sure you get a seat. Due to the fire code, we can’t exceed the maximum capacity for our rooms.

Read more MORE INFORMATION