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Meth, the Forgotten Killer, Is Back. And It’s Everywhere

PORTLAND, Ore. — They huddled against the biting wind, pacing from one corner to another hoping to score heroin or pills. But a different drug was far more likely to be on offer outside the train station downtown, where homeless drug users live in tents pitched on the sidewalk.

“Everybody has meth around here — everybody,” said Sean, a 27-year-old heroin user who hangs out downtown and gave only his first name. “It’s the easiest to find.”

The scourge of crystal meth, with its exploding labs and ruinous effect on teeth and skin, has been all but forgotten amid national concern over the opioid crisis. But 12 years after Congress took aggressive action to curtail it, meth has returned with a vengeance.

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Public urged to line procession route for fallen Pierce Co. Sheriff’s Deputy

Public urged to line procession route for fallen Pierce Co. Sheriff’s Deputy

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TACOMA, Wash. – The public is urged to line the procession route on Wednesday as law enforcement escort the body of fallen Pierce County Sheriff’s Deputy Daniel McCartney to a memorial service at Pacific Lutheran University in Tacoma.

“Please come out – we can’t put into words how much it means to the family and to all of the first responders who will be participating in the memorial,” the Sheriff’s office wrote in a message on their Facebook Page.

The procession will begin around 11:00 a.m. at the North Gate of Joint Base Lewis-McChord.

The Sherrif’s office said the procession will then follow this route:

Leave Joint Base Lewis-McChord North Gate
East on 112th Street S.
South on Steele Street S.
East on Cross-Base Highway (State Route 704)
North on Pacific Avenue
West on Tule Lake Road S.
North on Yamika Avenue S.
West on 124th Street S.
Arrive at Pacific Lutheran University
The procession is set to arrive at PLU’s Olson Auditorium at 11:45 a.m.

The memorial is open to the public but parking won’t be available on site.

For those who would like to attend to attend, parking will be available at the Church of All Nations located at 111 112th Street E. in Tacoma. Shuttle service will leave the church and head the PLU campus starting at 11:15 a.m.

The memorial is set to begin at 1:00 p.m.

Govenor Jay Inslee has also ordered all state agencies to lower Washington state and U.S. flags to half-staff on Wednesday in honor of Deputy McCartney.

RELATED | New Pierce County Sheriff’s K9 named after fallen deputy Daniel McCartney

McCartney was shot and killed on Jan. 7 while investigating a home-invasion burglary in Frederickson. He is survived by a wife and three young sons.

A legacy fund that has been set up to help McCartney’s family. Donations can be made at any Tapco or TwinStar Credit Union or online through Tacoma/Pierce County Crime Stoppers.

Read more here

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SPD Officers Use Naloxone, CPR to Revive man

Published on May 23, 2017
Police responded to a report of a man down in the 1500 block of 9th Avenue just before midnight and were quickly flagged down by a woman. The woman pointed officers to a man lying on the sidewalk, and said he had recently used heroin.

Officer Jared Levitt and Sergeant Dave Hockett saw the 40-year-old man was struggling to breathe and gave him a dose of nasal naloxone and began CPR a short time later.

SFD medics arrived and took over treatment of the man, who regained consciousness and was taken to Harborview Medical Center for treatment.

This incident marks the 16th time officers have used Naloxone since Seattle police began carrying it in mid-March. The case will become part of the ongoing study conducted by the University of Washington into SPD’s use of Naloxone for a possible department-wide deployment.

As a reminder, Washington law provides immunity from criminal drug possession charges for anyone seeking medical aid for themselves or someone else experiencing an overdose.

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URGE KING COUNTY TO FOLLOW THE OPIATE TASK FORCE RECOMMENDATIONS


The opiate epidemic in King County is growing. The King County Opiate Addiction Task Force has recommended a new comprehensive strategy to fight this crisis, including the opening of two pilot safe consumption spaces. In these facilities, healthcare professionals can prevent overdose deaths, reduce the spread of diseases like HIV and Hepatitis C, and efficiently refer people struggling with addiction to treatment. Tell the King County Council to support this safe, effective, and scientifically proven method of responding to the opiate epidemic.

URGE KING COUNTY TO FOLLOW THE OPIATE TASK FORCE RECOMMENDATIONS

Please visit THIS LINK

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The Seattle Police Department’s Strategies for the Future

Plan Overview
The Seattle Police Department has achieved remarkable progress in the eyes of our federal and local government officials, the people of Seattle, and the women and men of the Department. This work began when Mayor Murray took office, and during the past two years has been guided by SPD’s four pillars of policing – Enhance Public Trust, Build Pride and Professionalism, Address Crime and Disorder, and Promote Best Business Practices.

These four principles form the foundation of the Department’s priorities for the next two years, and beyond, outlined in this strategic plan. These objectives are the result of the combined efforts of SPD leadership to develop long term goals to support the delivery of police services in a manner that reflects the values, needs, and expectations of entire City of Seattle.Public trust remains paramount, both in terms of achieving complete compliance with the settlement agreement and maintaining a singular focus on community engagement. As we look toward the next two years, the institutionalization of new modes and measures of supervision and oversight, allow the Department to refocus its efforts on the responsibilities of every day policing – answering calls for assistance.

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Read more FULL PLAN

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Seattle Police Department: Preventing Prowlers PSA

Preventing Prowlers PSA

It only takes a minute for an experienced thief to prowl your vehicle. Learn how you can deter thieves from targeting your neighborhood, parking garage and vehicle at http://www.seattle.gov/preventcarprowls

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Department of Justice to Launch Inaugural National Heroin and Opioid Awareness Week

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Department of Justice to Launch Inaugural National Heroin and Opioid Awareness Week

Attorney General Lynch will Travel to Lexington, Kentucky as Part of the Justice Department’s Awareness Campaign to Address the Rising Public Health Crisis of Drug Addiction

The Obama Administration is announcing a “week of action” to raise awareness about the rising public health crisis caused by drug overdoses. As part of this effort, the Department of Justice designated the week of Sept.18-23, 2016, as National Heroin and Opioid Awareness Week. Senior Department of Justice officials, members of the President’s Cabinet and other federal agencies will hold events focused on the work being done to address the national prescription opioid and heroin epidemic.

Attorney General Loretta E. Lynch will travel to Lexington, Kentucky on TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2016, to hold a youth town hall at a local high school; meet with parents who have lost their children due to overdoses and now belong to the Heroin Education Action Team (H.E.A.T.); and deliver a policy speech regarding the actions and resources the Justice Department is bringing to bear on this issue.

“The heroin and opioid epidemic is one of the most urgent law enforcement and public health challenges facing our country,” said Attorney General Lynch. “Through National Heroin and Opioid Awareness Week, the Department of Justice seeks to raise awareness and prevent new victims from succumbing to addiction; to highlight the department’s ongoing commitment to holding accountable traffickers and others responsible for this epidemic; and to help provide treatment to those grappling with addiction. To be successful in this important endeavor, we need the help of all our federal, tribal, state and local partners. In the months ahead, we will continue working to erase this scourge from our communities and to ensure a brighter future for all Americans.”

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Here’s how to send love and support to injured officer, family

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A Mount Vernon police officer shot in the head is in “very critical” condition, a Harborview spokesperson said at a Friday morning press conference.

The hospital says the officer, 61, was in surgery for at least a few hours. Read developing updates here.

Hospital officials did not release any updates on the officer’s current condition, but said that concerned community members can send messages of love and support to the injured officer and his family via the Harboview website. Click here to visit.

Type “Mount Vernon police officer” in the patient’s name field, Susan Gregg, Harborview spokeswoman, said.

You can also show your support in the comments below.

Mount Vernon Police Department Facebook Page

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9/11/16 – John T. Williams Memorial Crosswalk

john-t-williams
In conjunction with the Seattle Police Department (SPD), Seattle’s Department of Neighborhoods, Seattle Indian Health Board and the SPD’s Native American Police Advisory Council we invite all media outlets and the community to attend a ground breaking ceremony for a new community crosswalk on the corner of Boren & Howell on Sunday, September 11th at 8 – 9 a.m.

The crosswalk will be in honor of and in the memory of John T. Williams. The crosswalk groundbreaking shall include a cleansing ceremony, the story behind the crosswalk and an opportunity for the press to ask questions of the organizers. The planned crosswalk depicts a Nuu-chah-nulth story about the White Deer. The story of the White Deer shall be read and available in written form for people at the event. Members from the above host organizations and the family of John T. Williams shall be available to answer your questions about the project. Light snacks and coffee will be provided.

We hope that the crosswalk helps people remember the life of John T. Williams, a Nuu-chah-nulth woodcarver. We also hope that the crosswalk also continues the subsequent work done by the Seattle Police Department, the Department of Justice and several members of the American Indian Community to foster positive changes throughout all communities within the City of Seattle and the Seattle Police Department.

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Reform advocates upset over pushback over changing malice law

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Members of the legislative task force formed to recommend policy to next year’s Legislature on how to reduce violent interactions involving law enforcement listen Tuesday to executive director Sue Rahr of the state Criminal Justice Training Center during their meeting at the Burien facility. Peter Haley phaley@thenewstribune.com

When an effort by state lawmakers to make prosecuting police for improper use of deadly force easier stalled last year, legislators compromised.

They agreed to let a task force study the issue and recommend policy to next year’s Legislature on how to reduce violent interactions involving law enforcement.

Read more here: http://www.thenewstribune.com/news/politics-government/article92684372.html#storylink=cpy

But some on the state-appointed committee, which had its second meeting Tuesday, say lawmakers overseeing the panel are filibustering even a dialogue about changing controversial state law regulating police use of deadly force.

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