Sign Up: National-SPD Night Out is Tuesday, August 7, 2018.

Night Out

Night Out is a national event promoted in Seattle by Seattle Police Department Crime Prevention. It is designed to heighten crime prevention awareness, increase neighborhood support in anti-crime efforts, and unite our communities.

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Night Out is Tuesday, August 7, 2018.
Registration is now open, and will close August 6th, at 5:00PM.

Night Out is August 7, 2018
Get Ready for Night Out!
Register for the event
To participate in Night Out and to have your street closed for the event, you must officially register your Night Out event with the City of Seattle.

Registration is open until 5:00PM Monday August 6, 2018

REGISTER

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JOIN: Project Safe Neighborhoods

Project Safe Neighborhoods

Gun Violence Remains a Major Problem in the United States

According to the National Crime Victimization Survey, 467,321 persons were victims of a crime committed with a firearm in 2011. In the same year, data collected by the FBI show that firearms were used in 68 percent of murders, 41 percent of robbery offenses and 21 percent of aggravated assaults nationwide.[

People between the ages of 15 and 24 are most likely to be targeted by gun violence. From 1976 to 2005, 77 percent of homicide victims ages 15-17 died from gun-related injuries. This age group was most at risk for gun violence during this time period.

Teens and young adults are more likely than persons of other ages to be murdered with a gun. Most violent gun crime, especially homicide, occurs in cities and urban communities. More information is available on the Office of Justice Programs National Institute of Justice website.

Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN) is a nationwide commitment to reduce gun crime in America by networking existing local programs that target gun crime and providing those programs with additional tools to fit the specific gun crime problems in each area. The goal is to create safer neighborhoods by reducing gun violence and sustaining that reduction.

For further information on this District’s PSN effort please contact:

Assistant U.S. Attorney Erin Becker
PSN Coordinator
206-553-7970

Prison Reform and Redemption Act 2018

LIVE: President Donald Trump Delivers Remarks At Prison Reform Summit – May 18, 2018 | CNBC

Summary: H.R.3356 — 115th Congress (2017-2018)All Information (Except Text)
There is one summary for H.R.3356. Bill summaries are authored by CRS.

Introduced in House (07/24/2017)
Prison Reform and Redemption Act

This bill directs the Department of Justice to develop the Post-Sentencing Risk and Needs Assessment System for use by the Bureau of Prisons (BOP) to assess prisoner recidivism risk; guide housing, grouping, and program assignments; and incentivize and reward participation in and completion of recidivism reduction programs and productive activities.

It amends the federal criminal code to:

require the BOP to implement the Post-Sentencing Risk and Needs Assessment System;
establish prerelease custody procedures for prisoners who, among other things, earn time credits for successfully completing recidivism reduction programs or productive activities;
prohibit, subject to specified exceptions, the use of restraints on federal prisoners who are pregnant or in postpartum recovery; and
broaden the duties of probation and pretrial services officers to include court-directed supervision of sex offenders conditionally released from civil commitment.
The BOP must:

incorporate de-escalation techniques into its training programs;
report on its ability to treat heroin and opioid abuse through medication-assisted treatment;
establish pilot programs on youth mentorship and service to abandoned, rescued, or vulnerable animals; and
designate a release preparation coordinator at each facility that houses prisoners.
The bill prohibits monitoring the contents of an electronic communication between a prisoner at a BOP facility and the prisoner’s attorney.

It amends the Second Chance Act of 2007 to reauthorize through FY2022 and modify eligibility criteria for an elderly offender early release pilot program.

Lieutenant Osvaldo Albarati Correctional Officer Self-Protection Act of 2017

The bill amends the federal criminal code to require the BOP to allow federal correctional officers to securely store and carry concealed firearms on BOP premises outside the security perimeter of a prison.

Read more HERE

Employment and education opportunities the plan for youth homelessness center at Pine and Broadway


Visit Capitolhillseattle.com

YouthCare was started in 1974, operates 11 sites across the area and focuses on providing emergency response, housing, employment and education services to people ages 12-24. They also run a facility assisting homeless youth who are LGBT, and a facility assisting youth who have been sexually exploited. They typically serve about 1,200 youth per year, Waits said.

Read more Here

Saturday July 16 – East Precinct Community Picnic

spd-july16

You are invited to a community picnic with the Seattle Police and the neighborhood surrounding Powell Barnett Park next Saturday, July 16, 1pm to 4pm, at Powell Barnett Park, MLK JR Way, between E Yesler and E Cherry. This is a community policing/fun activity — music, hot dogs and ice cream, entertainment and door prizes.

East Precinct Community Picnic

WHEN: Saturday, July 16, 2016 – 1:00 pm @ 1:00 PM – 4:00 PM
WHERE: Powell Barnett Park
Powell Barnett Park
352 Martin Luther King Jr Way, Seattle, WA 98122

See Event Website

Guiding Good Choices: Rainier Community Center

kds-laughing

With a focus on prevention, Communities in Action is offering its next Guiding Good Choices workshop beginning Tuesday (6/14) evening at Rainier Community Center (4800 38th Avenue S, Seattle).

This 5-session Guiding Good Choices series will be offered on 6/14, 6/16, 6/21, 6/23, and 6/30 with dinner provided at 5:30 pm.

Parents, grandparents, guardians, coaches and mentors of young people ages 9 – 14 will have a chance to learn and discuss:

-risks facing children today;
-setting guidelines;
-ways to help kids avoid trouble;
-dealing with family conflict
-cool ways to bond with the teens and pre-teens in their lives

With new laws and policies—in our ever changing world—we want to give young people many tools and opportunities.

Attached is a flier to share with clients, coaches, foster parents, friends, grandparents, guardians, mentors, staff, and teachers.

Space is limited.
To register call or text Liletha Williams at:
206.250.0853
lilethasrighthere@yahoo.com

Seattle Urban League ‘Career Bridge’ Program

find-a-job-after-theyre-released-from-prison

Please visit the Seattle Urban League Website

Career Bridge Overview

Career Bridge began in 2012, following a spate of gun violence and deaths in Seattle. Career Bridge was initially developed and piloted as a collaborative effort between the City of Seattle and community partners to address the disproportionate rates of violence and trauma research showed to be experienced by men of color, particularly African American men. Career Bridge was created to connect African-American men and other men of color who experience multiple barriers to employment, education and training with jobs, and other necessary support. Originally managed jointly by the City of Seattle’s Office of Economic Development and Human Services Department, Career Bridge was developed through an ongoing partnership with community sponsors and supporters (a network of formal and informal groups with strong ties and existing relationships within the community).

This innovative and community-driven model recognizes and builds on the strengths of existing community networks. Strong personal relationships, grassroots implementation and participant empowerment through shared leadership and accountability differentiate Career Bridge from other services provided to its target population. The Career Bridge Program model brings together workforce training, social services, as well as grassroots community support networks in order to provide a relevant and comprehensive approach to assist participants attain the abilities and skills needed to achieve short-term economic and personal stability. Using a cohort model, individuals enter and progress through Career Bridge as a group.

Participants benefit from the mutual motivation, encouragement and collaborative learning that occurs within a cohort model.

Participants’ peers also become an important part of their network of support.

Class description

Classes are 80 hours (classes times: 12:30pm – 4:30pm, Monday through Friday)
Participants will receive 6 college credits through South Seattle College and a student ID# upon completion for continuing education.
$75 stipends paid to each participant per week for attendance.
There will be 2 days in each curriculum set aside for Community partners.
Job development services offered to Career Bridge participants through multiple resources.
Increased computer lab days to strengthen resume, cover letter, and online job search.
Increased training at Monroe Correctional Facility including work with Work Force development in prisons.

We understand that the best solution to crime prevention is a job. Career Bridge is the answer.

Click here to apply and call for an appointment at (206) 461-3792 Ext 3036.

Current Class Schedule

Start date—August 31st through September 25th
Class times—12:30PM to 4:30PM; Monday through Friday.
Computer lab days: Sep 7, 10, and 18.
All other days to be conducted in the open class room.
Total students 10-12 per class.

Graduation date: Tuesday, Sept 29th (held at Damascus Baptist Church Lower Banquet Room)

Program Model

Community Sponsors and Supporters: A key element of Career Bridge is the expectation that participants are referred by people who are well acquainted with them and committed to ongoing mentoring, leadership development, and problem solving support throughout the process.

Wrap-Around Support: Career Bridge recognizes the importance of and therefore helps facilitate participant’s connection to resources to address basic needs (i.e. food, transportation, housing, etc.), wrap services (i.e. childcare, utility assistance, etc.) and unsolved trauma (i.e. healthy relationships, mental health, substance use/abuse, etc.).

Employment & Career Training & Assistance: Career Bridge incorporates assistance with job readiness, job search, training, and labor market information. The program model facilitates ongoing assistance with job placement and connections to training needed for good-paying jobs that provide a pathway to long-term careers.

Support The Urban League Today!

The Urban League of Metropolitan Seattle is a nonprofit recognized as tax-exempt under Section 501(c)(3) of the United States Internal Revenue Code. Your donation is tax-deductible for U.S. tax purposes under Section 170 of the Code.
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Capitol Hill Hate Crimes: TONIGHT 7 p.m. at All Pilgrims Church, 500 Broadway East on Capitol Hill

lgbtq

SEATTLE – Hundreds of residents of Seattle’s Capitol Hill say they no longer feel safe in one of the city’s most popular neighborhoods.

Recent crimes have put the lesbian and gay community on edge – leading to a large meeting planned for Tuesday night.

Officials say it’s hard to put an exact number on the recent hate crimes that have targeted Capitol Hill’s lesbian, gay and transgendered residents. Some go unreported and others may not be legally classified as a hate crime.

But those who live and work there say they’ve seen it – and experienced it.

KOMO News has reported on several incidents, as recently as last month. Many involve harassment, and some do get physical. Now community leaders want to reverse what they see as a troubling trend in one of the city’s most diverse and inclusive neighborhoods.

“There is definitely a sense in the community that the Hill is no longer safe and that obviously is tearing at the fabric of our ability to have safe spaces,” says Danni Askini of the Gender Justice League. “If not the Hill, then where?”

Askini is moderating Tuesday night’s meeting with community leaders. Seattle City Councilwoman Kshama Sawant’s office is helping spearhead the discussion. The meeting gets under way at 7 p.m. at All Pilgrims Church, 500 Broadway East on Capitol Hill. About 300 people are expected.

The goal is to not only brainstorm solutions but to become proactive as summer approaches – a time when nicer weather means more people are out in the neighborhood and a time when there tends to be more violence.

Read more FULL REPORT