Saturday July 16 – East Precinct Community Picnic

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You are invited to a community picnic with the Seattle Police and the neighborhood surrounding Powell Barnett Park next Saturday, July 16, 1pm to 4pm, at Powell Barnett Park, MLK JR Way, between E Yesler and E Cherry. This is a community policing/fun activity — music, hot dogs and ice cream, entertainment and door prizes.

East Precinct Community Picnic

WHEN: Saturday, July 16, 2016 – 1:00 pm @ 1:00 PM – 4:00 PM
WHERE: Powell Barnett Park
Powell Barnett Park
352 Martin Luther King Jr Way, Seattle, WA 98122

See Event Website

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Guiding Good Choices: Rainier Community Center

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With a focus on prevention, Communities in Action is offering its next Guiding Good Choices workshop beginning Tuesday (6/14) evening at Rainier Community Center (4800 38th Avenue S, Seattle).

This 5-session Guiding Good Choices series will be offered on 6/14, 6/16, 6/21, 6/23, and 6/30 with dinner provided at 5:30 pm.

Parents, grandparents, guardians, coaches and mentors of young people ages 9 – 14 will have a chance to learn and discuss:

-risks facing children today;
-setting guidelines;
-ways to help kids avoid trouble;
-dealing with family conflict
-cool ways to bond with the teens and pre-teens in their lives

With new laws and policies—in our ever changing world—we want to give young people many tools and opportunities.

Attached is a flier to share with clients, coaches, foster parents, friends, grandparents, guardians, mentors, staff, and teachers.

Space is limited.
To register call or text Liletha Williams at:
206.250.0853
lilethasrighthere@yahoo.com

Seattle Urban League ‘Career Bridge’ Program

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Please visit the Seattle Urban League Website

Career Bridge Overview

Career Bridge began in 2012, following a spate of gun violence and deaths in Seattle. Career Bridge was initially developed and piloted as a collaborative effort between the City of Seattle and community partners to address the disproportionate rates of violence and trauma research showed to be experienced by men of color, particularly African American men. Career Bridge was created to connect African-American men and other men of color who experience multiple barriers to employment, education and training with jobs, and other necessary support. Originally managed jointly by the City of Seattle’s Office of Economic Development and Human Services Department, Career Bridge was developed through an ongoing partnership with community sponsors and supporters (a network of formal and informal groups with strong ties and existing relationships within the community).

This innovative and community-driven model recognizes and builds on the strengths of existing community networks. Strong personal relationships, grassroots implementation and participant empowerment through shared leadership and accountability differentiate Career Bridge from other services provided to its target population. The Career Bridge Program model brings together workforce training, social services, as well as grassroots community support networks in order to provide a relevant and comprehensive approach to assist participants attain the abilities and skills needed to achieve short-term economic and personal stability. Using a cohort model, individuals enter and progress through Career Bridge as a group.

Participants benefit from the mutual motivation, encouragement and collaborative learning that occurs within a cohort model.

Participants’ peers also become an important part of their network of support.

Class description

Classes are 80 hours (classes times: 12:30pm – 4:30pm, Monday through Friday)
Participants will receive 6 college credits through South Seattle College and a student ID# upon completion for continuing education.
$75 stipends paid to each participant per week for attendance.
There will be 2 days in each curriculum set aside for Community partners.
Job development services offered to Career Bridge participants through multiple resources.
Increased computer lab days to strengthen resume, cover letter, and online job search.
Increased training at Monroe Correctional Facility including work with Work Force development in prisons.

We understand that the best solution to crime prevention is a job. Career Bridge is the answer.

Click here to apply and call for an appointment at (206) 461-3792 Ext 3036.

Current Class Schedule

Start date—August 31st through September 25th
Class times—12:30PM to 4:30PM; Monday through Friday.
Computer lab days: Sep 7, 10, and 18.
All other days to be conducted in the open class room.
Total students 10-12 per class.

Graduation date: Tuesday, Sept 29th (held at Damascus Baptist Church Lower Banquet Room)

Program Model

Community Sponsors and Supporters: A key element of Career Bridge is the expectation that participants are referred by people who are well acquainted with them and committed to ongoing mentoring, leadership development, and problem solving support throughout the process.

Wrap-Around Support: Career Bridge recognizes the importance of and therefore helps facilitate participant’s connection to resources to address basic needs (i.e. food, transportation, housing, etc.), wrap services (i.e. childcare, utility assistance, etc.) and unsolved trauma (i.e. healthy relationships, mental health, substance use/abuse, etc.).

Employment & Career Training & Assistance: Career Bridge incorporates assistance with job readiness, job search, training, and labor market information. The program model facilitates ongoing assistance with job placement and connections to training needed for good-paying jobs that provide a pathway to long-term careers.

Support The Urban League Today!

The Urban League of Metropolitan Seattle is a nonprofit recognized as tax-exempt under Section 501(c)(3) of the United States Internal Revenue Code. Your donation is tax-deductible for U.S. tax purposes under Section 170 of the Code.
Donate Now

Capitol Hill Hate Crimes: TONIGHT 7 p.m. at All Pilgrims Church, 500 Broadway East on Capitol Hill

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SEATTLE – Hundreds of residents of Seattle’s Capitol Hill say they no longer feel safe in one of the city’s most popular neighborhoods.

Recent crimes have put the lesbian and gay community on edge – leading to a large meeting planned for Tuesday night.

Officials say it’s hard to put an exact number on the recent hate crimes that have targeted Capitol Hill’s lesbian, gay and transgendered residents. Some go unreported and others may not be legally classified as a hate crime.

But those who live and work there say they’ve seen it – and experienced it.

KOMO News has reported on several incidents, as recently as last month. Many involve harassment, and some do get physical. Now community leaders want to reverse what they see as a troubling trend in one of the city’s most diverse and inclusive neighborhoods.

“There is definitely a sense in the community that the Hill is no longer safe and that obviously is tearing at the fabric of our ability to have safe spaces,” says Danni Askini of the Gender Justice League. “If not the Hill, then where?”

Askini is moderating Tuesday night’s meeting with community leaders. Seattle City Councilwoman Kshama Sawant’s office is helping spearhead the discussion. The meeting gets under way at 7 p.m. at All Pilgrims Church, 500 Broadway East on Capitol Hill. About 300 people are expected.

The goal is to not only brainstorm solutions but to become proactive as summer approaches – a time when nicer weather means more people are out in the neighborhood and a time when there tends to be more violence.

Read more FULL REPORT

East Precinct Officers Now Testing Bodycams

Written by Jonah Spangenthal-Lee on December 23, 2014 11:38 am

Officers in the East Precinct have begun testing of a body-worn video cameras. Here’s our first-ever release of thrilling first-person police video, featuring officers responding to a report of disabled vehicle blocking a sidewalk.

Read more FULL REPORT

Asian Counseling and Referral Service (ACRS)

From: http://acrs.org/

Teen Peer Advocate Program

The Teen Peer Advocate Program (TPAP) is comprised of young women offering community education and peer-to-peer support groups for high school girls. Trained teen peer advocates provide education and outreach to other Asian Pacific American youth at area schools, communities and other youth services. The school-based support groups offer a safe space for young women to discuss healthy relationships and prevention of dating violence.

WARNING SIGNS OF DATING VIOLENCE
Your Partner:

Doesn’t want you to have friends, frequently checks up on you
Refuses to break up
Gives orders, makes all the decisions, or doesn’t take your opinions seriously
Makes you worry about how his/her reactions to things you say or do
Threatens you
Owns or uses weapons
Has a history of fighting, quickly loses temper, abuses animals, brags about mistreating others
Gets too serious about the relationship too fast
Abuses alcohol or other drugs, pressures you to take them
Blames you for his/her mistreatment of you, says you provoked him/her
Has a history of troubled relationships, blames previous partners
Causes your family or friends to worry about you or your safety

MY DATING BILL OF RIGHTS*
I have the right to:

Trust myself and my instincts
Ask for a date
Refuse a date
Suggest activities
Refuse any activities, even if my partner is excited about them
Express my opinions and have them respected
Be respected as a person
Disagree
Make mistakes
Change my mind
Have a partner who is faithful
Have my limits respected
Tell my partner I want affection
Refuse affection
Be listened to
Be cared about
Refuse sex with anyone, anytime
Not be hit, slapped or shoved
Not be humiliated in public or private
Break up with someone who hurts me, even if I love him/her
Break up with someone who hurts me, even if they love me
Ask for help if I need it

I have the responsibility to:

Determine my limits
Respect other people’s limits
Communicate clearly and honestly, if it is safe
Take care of myself
Ask for help if I need it

*Adapted from Warning! Dating May Be Hazardous to Your Health!, Mother Courage Press, Racine, WI.

SEATTLE/KING COUNT RESOURCES: **
Abused Deaf Women’s Advocacy Services * TDD 206-726-0093
Asian Counseling and Referral Service * 206-695-7600
Asian Pacific Islander Women & Safety Center * 206-467-9976
Chaya (South Asians) * 206-325-0325 or 1-877-92-CHAYA
Child Protective Services (CPS) * 1-800-609-8764
Children’s Response Center * 425-688-5130
Chinese Information & Service Center * 206-624-5633
Communities Against Rape & Abuse * 206-322-4856
Consejo Counseling Referral Services (Latino/Hispanic) * 206-461-4880
Crisis Clinic * 206-461-3222
Domestic Abuse Women’s Network (DAWN) * 425- 656-STOP (7867)
Eastside Asian Pacific Islanders * 1-877-689-4162
Eastside Domestic Violence (24 hours) * 425-746-1940 or 1-800-827-8840
Harborview Center for Sexual Assault & Traumatic Stress* 206-744-1600
King County Protection Order Advocacy Program * 206-296-9547
King County Sexual Assault & Resource Center * 425- 226-7273
Korean Community Counseling Center * 206-784-5691
New Beginnings (24 hours) * 206-522-9472
NW Network of Bisexual, Trans, Lesbian and Gay Survivors of Abuse * 206-568-7777
Refugee Women’s Alliance (ReWA) * 206-721-0243
Teen Link Hotline * 206-461-4922
WA State Coalition of Sexual Assault Programs * 360-754-7583
WA State Domestic Violence Hotline (24 hours) * 1-800-562-6025
Youth Eastside Services * 425-747-4937
Youthlink * 425-452-5254
YWCA-East Cherry (African Americans) * 206-461-4882

**Compiled by the Teen Peer Advocate Program 2007**

CONTACT INFORMATION:
Please contact (206) 695-7600 and ask for the AP ADVICE Coordinator.
Visit TPAP’s official site at http://www.acrsteenadvocates.org for more information.

Please visit: http://acrs.org/

Asian Counseling and Referral Service (ACRS) is a nationally recognized nonprofit organization offering a broad array of human services and behavioral health programs to Asian Pacific Americans in King County. ACRS is the largest multiservice organization serving all the different Asian Pacific American communities – immigrants, refugees and American born – in the Pacific Northwest.

Community Outreach: United States Attorney’s Office for the Western District of Washington

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Community Outreach

The United States Attorney’s Office for the Western District of Washington is committed to effectively serving our community and engages in outreach in order to prevent crime, respond to community needs, and promote good citizenship. Through our outreach efforts, the office connects with local community groups and organizations to discuss ways our work affects them, and provide an avenue for members of the community to express issues of concern and report federal crimes or civil rights violations.

A number of outreach efforts are underway. In concert with the work of our Hate Crimes Task Force, the office is engaged in efforts to reach out to, and more fully engage, members of our Arab, Muslim, and Sikh communities whose members often find themselves targets of hate crimes. In addition, we actively work to address the public safety concerns of our 23 Native American tribes within the Western District of Washington. And we conduct extensive community outreach through law enforcement initiatives such as

Project Safe Childhood, which combats sexual exploitation crimes against children;

Project Safe Neighborhood, which focuses both on arresting and prosecuting serial criminals who illegally use or possess firearms, and assisting communities in addressing issues that, left unchecked, may lead to gun violence; and

The Washington Anti-Trafficking Advisory Committee, which is dedicated to identifying and rescuing trafficking victims, providing social services and immigration relief to victims, and fully investigating and prosecuting traffickers.

Should you have a question about, or wish to participate in, any one of our outreach efforts please call us at 206-553-7970. Executive Assistant U.S. Attorney Thomas Bates directs our outreach efforts and other members of the staff lead specific initiatives, including:

Bruce Miyake, Assistant U.S. Attorney – Hate Crimes Task Force

Jerrod Patterson, Assistant U.S. Attorney – Project Safe Childhood Coordinator

Jill Otake, Assistant U.S. Attorney – Project Safe Neighborhood Coordinator

Susie Roe, Assistant U.S. Attorney – Tribal Outreach Coordinator

Ye-Ting Woo, Assistant U.S. Attorney – Washington Anti-Trafficking Advisory Committee

The U.S. Attorney and Assistant U.S. Attorneys, along with other office staff, regularly speak at community meetings, local events and schools throughout Washington regarding the work of the officeUSAO as well as specific law enforcement or crime prevention issues of interest. To request a guest speaker contact Public Affairs Officer Emily Langlie at Emily.Langlie@usdoj.gov or 206-553-4110.

Garfield Community Center: Friday, December 12, Seattle Parks and Recreation Teen Unit

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This Friday, December 12, Seattle Parks and Recreation Teen Unit will be hosting a youth police relations forum. We want ALL youth to be able to speak up, be heard, and feel comfortable doing so in a safe place.

It is FREE, and refreshments and dinner will be provided! The event will be at Garfield Teen Life Center, starting at 5pm. See the flyer below to see which bus routes stop nearby.

Please RSVP today through our Facebook event.

Email us at teen.programs@seattle.gov or call at: 206.684.4575 if you have any questions about this event.

Lets Review: Jason Lajeunesse

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Cool Jason Lajeunesse

From: http://www.onlythebeat.com

Once a year, Seattleites take over a few blocks of Capitol Hill to enjoy music, drinks, and the summer weather. The Capitol Hill Block Party has come to be a favorite for many who live near Seattle. Boasting three days of musical acts, the CHBP encompasses a wide variety of genres to give those attending the block party a chance to hear new music they have never heard before while at the same time bringing in a few larger top notch acts that attendees know and love.

This year is no exception with the Capitol Hill Block Party bringing in acts such as Chromeo, A$AP Ferg and Rocky, ODESZA, Spoon, and The War On Drugs to headline while flushing out the lineup with amazing up and coming acts such as RAC, Manatee Commune, Slow Magic, and many more. I was given the chance to interview the man who works tirelessly behind the scenes year round to produce the Capitol Hill Block party and operate most of your favorite clubs and music venues in Capitol Hill; Jason Lajeunesse.

Jason Lajeunesse has worked in the music industry since the mid-1990s, starting his career as a talent buyer for venues in the Pacific Northwest. Jason now is managing partner at Neumos, Moe Bar, Big Mario’s Pizza, The Comet Tavern, Barboza, Pike Street Fish Fry, Lost Lake Cafe and Lounge, and Sealed With a Kiss Presents, all of which are located in Seattle’s Capitol Hill neighborhood. In 2012, Jason became the producer and owner of the Capitol Hill Block Party (CHBP) after acting as Program Director from 2006 to 2011. That year, Seattle Magazine included Jason in their “Most Influential Seattle People” round-up. Jason has served on the Board of Directors at the Vera Project and currently serves on the Board of Directors at The Capitol Hill Chamber of Commerce. He continues to work in the music industry and ties his love of creative process, community, and business together throughout all his endeavors.

Getting to interview the owner of such an incredible festival was quite an honor for me, and after working with other members of the OTB Family, a list of questions was compiled for Mr Lajeunesse. Here for your reading pleasure then is Jason Lajeunesse on the Capitol Hill Block Party.

Read more Jason Lajeunesse

Obama: Mayors, other leaders to help minority boys

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Barack Obama is broadening a program that is designed to help make young minority men’s lives better.

The White House says the “My Brother’s Keeper” initiative will begin working with mayors and tribal and community leaders to develop a “cradle to college and career strategy” for these young people. Many are at risk of not completing their educations or falling into the criminal justice system.

Obama is announcing the expansion Saturday night at the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation’s annual awards dinner in Washington.

Details will be released next week.

Obama unveiled the “My Brother’s Keeper” program at the White House in February. Businesses, foundations and community groups coordinate investments to develop or support programs geared toward young men of color. Educators and top athletes also participate.

Read more FULL ARTICLE