Seattle Police Department: Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion (LEAD)

Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion (LEAD) is a pre-booking diversion pilot program developed with the community to address low-level drug and prostitution crimes in the Belltown neighborhood in Seattle and the Skyway area of unincorporated King County. The program allows law enforcement officers to redirect low-level offenders engaged in drug or prostitution activity to community-based services, instead of jail and prosecution. By diverting eligible individuals to services, LEAD is committed to improving public safety and public order, and reducing the criminal behavior of people who participate in the program.

About LEAD
Frequently Asked Questions
LEAD Policy Coordinating Group

Funders
Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion (LEAD) is a new innovative pilot program that was developed with the community to address low-level drug and prostitution crimes in the Belltown neighborhood in Seattle and the Skyway area of unincorporated King County. LEAD will divert low-level drug and prostitution offenders into community-based treatment and support services – including housing, healthcare, job training, treatment and mental health support — instead of processing them through traditional criminal justice system avenues.

A unique coalition of law enforcement agencies, public officials, and community groups collaborated to create this pilot program. These groups make up LEAD’s Policy Coordinating Group, which governs the program.

LEAD’s goal is to improve public safety and public order, and to reduce the criminal behavior of people who participate in the program. The program will be thoroughly evaluated to determine whether it has been successful or not.

Frequently Asked Questions

Below are frequently asked questions about LEAD. If you have further questions about the program, please contact us.

What is LEAD?

LEAD is a pre-booking diversion program that allows officers to redirect low-level offenders engaged in drugs or prostitution activity to community-based services instead of jail and prosecution. LEAD participants begin working immediately with case managers to access services. LEAD’s goals are to reduce the harm a drug offender causes him or herself, as well as the harm that the individual is causing the surrounding community. This public safety program has the potential to reduce recidivism rates for low-level offenders and preserve expensive criminal justice system resources for more serious or violent offenders.

How does LEAD differ from other drug programs?

First, LEAD is the result of a commitment from law enforcement agencies, public officials, and community organizations to work together in implementing a new approach to addressing drug and prostitution activity. Second, the diversion in LEAD is made at the pre-booking stage, in the hopes of bypassing the costs and time entailed in booking, charging, and requiring court appearances of an individual. Finally, LEAD provides participants with immediate case management services, and access to additional resources not available through existing public programs.

Who is eligible for diversion into LEAD?

Individuals who are arrested for eligible offenses within specified boundaries for Belltown or Skyway may be diverted into LEAD. Eligible offenses include low-level drug offenses, and engaging in prostitution. Individuals who have certain violent offenses in their criminal history are ineligible for diversion.

Who designed LEAD?

LEAD is the result of an unusual collaboration among diverse stakeholders. Collaborators include the King County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office, the Seattle City Attorney’s Office, the Seattle Police Department, the King County Sheriff’s Office, the King County Executive, the Mayor’s Office, The Washington State Department of Corrections, The Defender Association, the ACLU of Washington, and community members. The collaboration of these stakeholders was motivated by a shared dissatisfaction with the outcomes and costs of traditional drug law enforcement.

Who runs LEAD?

As noted, LEAD is the result of a collaboration among a number of stakeholders. All stakeholders are represented on LEAD’s Policy Coordinating Group, and the group makes decisions by consensus via a memorandum of understanding. LEAD is entirely voluntary, and any stakeholder may choose to withdraw from LEAD at any time.

Who will provide services to LEAD participants?

LEAD stakeholders have contracted with Evergreen Treatment Services (ETS) to provide services to LEAD participants. ETS has provided addiction treatment services in Washington for over 30 years, and has been actively involved in federally-funded research projects. ETS’ REACH Program has been a key provider in the delivery of street outreach services to chronically homeless and chemically addicted adults in Seattle for 15 years. ETS will follow harm reduction principles and will attempt to provide immediate access to services.

How will we know if LEAD works?

All LEAD stakeholders are committed to evaluating the program rigorously. The evaluation will consider, among other factors, whether LEAD has resulted in reductions in drug use and recidivism, whether LEAD is more cost-effective than traditional criminal justice processing, and whether LEAD has had a positive impact on a community’s quality of life.

How much will LEAD cost the City of Seattle and King County?

Nothing. LEAD stakeholders obtained funding from private foundations to implement the program. Its funders include the Ford Foundation, Open Society Foundations, Vital Projects Fund, RiverStyx Foundation, Massena Foundation, and the Social Justice Fund Northwest.

Do community members support LEAD?

Community members strongly support LEAD. LEAD will be piloted first in Belltown, and then in Skyway (in partnership with the King County Sheriff’s Office). Members of both communities have participated in the program’s design, and will continue to provide feedback about the program. For example, the LEAD Community Advisory Board in Belltown includes representatives from the Belltown Community Council, Belltown Business Association, Downtown Seattle Association/Metropolitan Improvement District, Recovery Café, YWCA, Plymouth Housing Group, and Millionair Club Charity. The LEAD Community Advisory Board in Skyway includes representatives from Skyway United Methodist Church, Westhill Community Council, and Skyway Solutions.

For how long will LEAD be implemented?

LEAD formally began on October 1, 2011. The program is anticipated to run for two years before an evaluation is begun, and to continue with foundation funding for an additional two years while the evaluation is conducted and analyzed. If LEAD is found to be effective, an ongoing source of funding will be sought.

Have programs like LEAD been implemented elsewhere?

LEAD was inspired by “arrest-referral” programs in the United Kingdom. Those programs have recently been implemented in virtually every police department in the United Kingdom because pilot projects proved to be so effective.

Policy Coordinating Group
LEAD is governed by a Policy Coordinating Group. The group makes decisions by consensus via a memorandum of understanding. LEAD is entirely voluntary, and any stakeholder may choose to withdraw from LEAD at any time. The members include:

Seattle Office of the Mayor
King County Executive Office
Seattle City Council
King County Council
Seattle City Attorney’s Office
King County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office
Seattle Police Department
King County Sheriff’s Office
Washington Department of Corrections
Belltown LEAD Community Advisory Board
Skyway LEAD Community Advisory Board
The Defender Association, Racial Disparity Project
ACLU of Washington, Drug Policy Project

Funders
LEAD is currently operating as a pilot program and is being funded by private foundations. It is hoped that LEAD will eventually find permanent funding from public sources. The cost-effectiveness of the program will be studied in detail as part of the evaluation for LEAD.

Current funders include:

Ford Foundation
Open Society Foundations
Vital Projects Fund
RiverStyx Foundation
Massena Foundation
The Social Justice Fund Northwest

Read more about LEAD

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Councilmember Mike O’Brien: Road to Housing

Road to Housing

Road to HousingThe Road to Housing program (R2H) began in Seattle as the Safe Parking Pilot Program in 2012 under the leadership of City Councilmember Mike O’Brien. Over the last two and a half years, the pilot has demonstrated an effective public-private partnership between the City and faith-based organizations for helping people living in their vehicles get back into housing. In this partnership, faith-based organizations provide safe places to park, access to a bathroom for participants in the program, and other supports that vary by site such as a regular community meal, microwave, clothing drives, and opportunities to connect with the congregational community. Compass Housing Alliance provides case management, support, and outreach to vehicular residents and potential host organizations.

Goals
The two primary goals of the Road to Housing program areto assist homeless people living in their vehicles to get back into housing as soon as possible, and to reduce neighborhood tensions in communities where vehicular residents tend to congregate

In Seattle and King County, people in their vehicles make up about one-third of the unsheltered population. Faith-based organizations in other parts of the region have already started hosting vehicular residents on their own, so there are opportunities to work with suburban cities and the County on a region-wide approach.

Outcomes
In 2013, the Road to Housing program served 52 vehicular residents, helping 34 households move into a more stable living environment, such as motel vouchers, and transitional or permanent housing. So far in 2014 (January – June), the Road to Housing program has worked with 91 households through case management services, and outreach services has contacted 173 unique households. Program staff work to build relationships with vehicular residents around Seattle, and provide assistance and support for needs identified by individual clients.

Challenges
In 2014, the Seattle City Council added additional funding to expand the Road to Housing program from a pilot to a citywide program, but more needs to be done to serve this growing population. Expanding the program means we need more program parking spaces, more host organizations and a faster placement into improved housing options for participants in the program. Expansion also means we will be working with other cities around King County, to provide similar supports to vehicular residents in those communities.

Opportunities to help
There are many ways you can help support this program, and the biggest way is to talk to your congregation about becoming a host site for Road to Housing participants. Program sites usually host between 3-5 vehicles at a time, which can be cars and/or RVs. Currently, there is a high need for safe places to park RVs, with few options available. Your faith-based organization is in a unique position to participate as a R2H program host site, helping individuals & families who are currently living in a vehicle to access a safe place to park, supportive services, and work to transition out of homelessness and into stable housing

Worried about cost?
There is funding available through the City of Seattle to help faith-based organizations make capital improvements to become a program host site.

For more information
If you are interested in learning more about Seattle’s Road to Housing program or learning more about becoming a program host site, contact Wayne Wilson with Compass Housing Alliance, at wwilson@compasshousingalliance.org.

If you are currently living in your vehicle and are interested in accessing the program, please call the Road to Housing program intake line at (206) 474-1650.

Visit Councilmember Mike O’Brien website

Sign Up: National-SPD Night Out is Tuesday, August 7, 2018.

Night Out

Night Out is a national event promoted in Seattle by Seattle Police Department Crime Prevention. It is designed to heighten crime prevention awareness, increase neighborhood support in anti-crime efforts, and unite our communities.

REGISTER

Night Out is Tuesday, August 7, 2018.
Registration is now open, and will close August 6th, at 5:00PM.

Night Out is August 7, 2018
Get Ready for Night Out!
Register for the event
To participate in Night Out and to have your street closed for the event, you must officially register your Night Out event with the City of Seattle.

Registration is open until 5:00PM Monday August 6, 2018

REGISTER

Free Summer Meals and Recreation Activities

Free Summer Meals and Recreation Activities
May 17, 2018 by Christina Hirsch

FREE SUMMER MEALS

This summer, Seattle Parks and Recreation, Seattle Human Services Department, and United Way of King County are partnering to host a drop-in summer program offering free meals and recreation activities. Recreation activities are open for kids and teens ages 1 to 18 and may include arts, crafts, board games, and organized recreational games. A free lunch and snacks will be offered to youth ages 1 to 18. The program will run daily from June 27 to August 24 from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday rain or shine at 19 park sites across Seattle.

2018 Summer Meals and Recreation Field Days locations:

• Beacon Hill Playground: 1902 13th Ave. S
• Beer Sheva Park: 8650 55th Ave. S
• Brighton Playground: 6000 39th Ave. S
• EC Hughes Playground: 7907 30th Ave. SW
• Georgetown Park: 750 S Homer St.
• Greenwood Park: 602 N 87th St.
• Highland Park: 1100 SW Cloverdale St.
• Judkins Playground: 2150 S Norman St.
• Lakewood Playground: 5013 S Angeline St.
• Lakeridge Playground: 10145 Rainier Ave. S
• Little Brook Park: 140th and 32nd Ave. NE
• Madrona Playground: 3211 E Spring St.
• Maplewood Playfield: 4801 Corson Ave. S
• North Acres Park: 12718 1st Ave. NE
• Othello Playground: 4351 S Othello St.
• Peppi’s Playground: 3233 E Spruce St.
• Powell Barnett Park: 352 MLK Jr. Way
• Pratt Park: 1800 S Main St.
• Roxhill Park: 2850 SW Roxbury St.

FREE SUMMER MEALS

For questions or more information about the program, please contact Nicholas Farline, Sr. Recreation Program Specialist at 206-615-0303 or nicholas.farline@seattle.gov.

JOIN: Project Safe Neighborhoods

Project Safe Neighborhoods

Gun Violence Remains a Major Problem in the United States

According to the National Crime Victimization Survey, 467,321 persons were victims of a crime committed with a firearm in 2011. In the same year, data collected by the FBI show that firearms were used in 68 percent of murders, 41 percent of robbery offenses and 21 percent of aggravated assaults nationwide.[

People between the ages of 15 and 24 are most likely to be targeted by gun violence. From 1976 to 2005, 77 percent of homicide victims ages 15-17 died from gun-related injuries. This age group was most at risk for gun violence during this time period.

Teens and young adults are more likely than persons of other ages to be murdered with a gun. Most violent gun crime, especially homicide, occurs in cities and urban communities. More information is available on the Office of Justice Programs National Institute of Justice website.

Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN) is a nationwide commitment to reduce gun crime in America by networking existing local programs that target gun crime and providing those programs with additional tools to fit the specific gun crime problems in each area. The goal is to create safer neighborhoods by reducing gun violence and sustaining that reduction.

For further information on this District’s PSN effort please contact:

Assistant U.S. Attorney Erin Becker
PSN Coordinator
206-553-7970

Walgreens: The opioid epidemic in our nation. #It Ends with Us.

The opioid epidemic in our nation has reached a critical point.

Every day thousands of teenagers and young adults find themselves spiraling down a path of addiction. Opioids are legal pain relievers that are typically prescribed for teens and young adults after major injuries and surgeries. Due to the addictive nature of these drugs — many young adults find themselves switching to illegal usage of heroin when their prescriptions run out, as it is less expensive and easier to access. Walgreens, together with teen community leaders, is committed to ending the epidemic through education and preventative measures. Let’s be part of the generation that ends this horrific epidemic of opioid addiction.

#ItEndsWithUs

Read more It Ends with Us at Walgreens

What is Neighborhood Watch?

The National Neighborhood Watch – A Division of the National Sheriffs’ Association Official Statement
National Neighborhood Watch (formerly USAonWatch) does not advocate watch members taking any action when observing suspicious activity in their neighborhood. Community members only serve as the extra “eyes and ears” and should report their observations of suspicious activities to their local law enforcement. Trained law enforcement should be the only ones ever to take action; citizens should never try to take action on those observations. National Neighborhood Watch (formerly USAonWatch) encourages all watch groups to register with our national database where multiple resources are made available to assist in the training and maintaining of Neighborhood Watch groups and its members.

For more information on how and when to report suspicious activity please refer to the Neighborhood Watch Manual

What is Neighborhood Watch?
In essence, Neighborhood Watch is a crime prevention program that stresses education and common sense (Stegenga 2000). It teaches citizens how to help themselves by identifying and reporting suspicious activity in their neighborhoods. In addition, it provides citizens with the opportunity to make their neighborhoods safer and improve the quality of life. Neighborhood Watch groups typically focus on observation and awareness as a means of preventing crime and employ strategies that range from simply promoting social interaction and “watching out for each other” to active patrols by groups of citizens (Yin, et al., 1976).

Most neighborhood crime prevention groups are organized around a block or a neighborhood and are started with assistance from a law enforcement agency. Volunteers who donate their time and resources are typically at the center of such programs, since many do not have a formal budget or source of funding. One study (Garofalo and McLeod, 1988) found that most Neighborhood Watches were located in areas that contained high percentages of single-family homes, little or no commercial establishments, and residents who had lived at their current address for more than five years. This study also found that most of the programs used street signs to show the presence of the program to potentially deter any would-be criminals.

All Neighborhood Watches share one foundational idea: that bringing community members together to reestablish control of their neighborhoods promotes an increased quality of life and reduces the crime rate in that area. As Rosenbaum (1988) put it “. . . if social disorganization is the problem and if traditional agents of social control no longer are performing adequately, we need to find alternative ways to strengthen informal social control and to restore a ‘sense of neighborhood'”. That’s precisely what Neighborhood Watch strives to do. In fact, from the earliest attempts to deal with the neighborhood structure as it relates to crime (through the Chicago Area Project of the early 1900s), to modern attempts at neighborhood crime prevention, collective action by residents has proved one of the most effective strategies.

The reason for this effectiveness is rather simple: Involving community members in watch programs decreases opportunities for criminals to commit crime rather than attempting to change their behavior or motivation.

Today’s Neighborhood Watch Program is an effective means of crime control and neighborhood cohesiveness. While not all of the programs in place today go by the same name, they all accomplish the same goal: to bring community members together to fight crime. As Minor aptly wrote, “Neighborhood is the key to maintaining successful relationships.”

NSA RELEASES MOST RECENT NALOXONE REPORT – ESTIMATES 175 LIVES SAVED

In November 2015, the National Sheriffs’ Association (NSA) partnered with Purdue Pharma L.P. (Purdue) to provide free-of-charge naloxone overdose kits and training to law enforcement agencies across the country. This “rescue drug” can reverse the fatal overdose effects of some opioids, including heroin. To date, NSA has trained more than 1,000 law enforcement officers and command staff to administer naloxone.

Furthermore, NSA has distributed 1,743 2-dose kits of naloxone (Narcan) aerosol (3,486 doses). Specifically, NSA has provided naloxone overdose kits to 39 law enforcement agencies covering 21 states, as outlined below. Finally, and most importantly, data collected in the project’s first 18 months document 120 lives saved. Now, 26 months into the project, we estimate that the NSA and Purdue partnership has saved more than 175 lives!

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PETITION FOR ASSISTANT SPD POLICE CHIEF PERRY TARRANT TO BECOME SEATTLE’S NEW POLICE CHIEF!

This dedicated officer is incredible with an outstanding performance Bio…

WE NEED TO PETITION FOR ASSISTANT SPD POLICE CHIEF PERRY TARRANT TO BECOME SEATTLE’S NEW POLICE CHIEF!


Assistant Chief Perry Tarrant
Assistant Chief – Special Operations Bureau
Assistant Chief Perry Tarrant commands the Special Operations Bureau.

Perry Tarrant has more 36 years of law enforcement experience. He began his career with the Tucson Police Department working Patrol, Canine, SWAT, and Bomb Squad. He also supervised or commanded these areas as well as Motorcycles, Internal Affairs Investigations, Aviation (with a Commercial Pilot license), Criminal Investigations, Emergency Management, and Homeland Security – Counterterrorism. Perry coordinated the City of Yakima PD’s Gang Initiative and community-based resources before coming to Seattle.

Perry Tarrant joined the Seattle Police as an Assistant Chief during the Department’s DOJ Settlement Agreement. He was part of a White House law enforcement advisory committee created by President Obama and chaired by Vice President Biden. He presented before Congress on civil rights, hate crimes, community policing, use of force, and 21st Century Policing. Additionally, he serves on the Executive Board of the National Organization of Black Law Enforcement Executives (NOBLE) and was elected its President for 2016 and 2017. He is a member of the Breakfast Group and Red Tail Hawks, which are local community organizations focused on youth mentoring. He is also serves as a board member of Choose 180, a program that works to keep youth out of the criminal justice system.

Assistant Chief Tarrant received his Master’s Degree in Public Administration with a Leadership Emphasis from Northern Arizona University, and his Bachelor of Arts in Political Science (Minor in Counterterrorism & Human Migration) from The University of Arizona. He holds additional academic certificates in Criminal Justice Graduate Studies from the University of Virginia and a Certificate of Study in Human Trafficking from The Ohio State University. He has completed the FBI National Academy, the Senior Management Institute for Police, and NOBLE’s CEO mentoring program. He is a FEMA Incident Commander and provided leadership for National Special Security Events such as national political party conventions, G-20 summit, and Unified Command for Super Bowl XLVIII.

Read more SPD COMMAND STAFF

Employment and education opportunities the plan for youth homelessness center at Pine and Broadway


Visit Capitolhillseattle.com

YouthCare was started in 1974, operates 11 sites across the area and focuses on providing emergency response, housing, employment and education services to people ages 12-24. They also run a facility assisting homeless youth who are LGBT, and a facility assisting youth who have been sexually exploited. They typically serve about 1,200 youth per year, Waits said.

Read more Here