capitol hill seattle, hate crime, rayshauna webber

Rayshauna’s World Donations

Barbara Webber is organizing this fundraiser.

Created 4 days ago

Funerals & Memorials
Rayshauna Webber was stabbed to death on July 14 2019 we want help from everyone to help with the funeral it would be a honor if you could at least donate something that would mean a lot to us thank you . God bless you

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Police announce arrest in weekend Capitol Hill fatal stabbing — UPDATE

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Seattle Police Department: Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion (LEAD)

Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion (LEAD) is a pre-booking diversion pilot program developed with the community to address low-level drug and prostitution crimes in the Belltown neighborhood in Seattle and the Skyway area of unincorporated King County. The program allows law enforcement officers to redirect low-level offenders engaged in drug or prostitution activity to community-based services, instead of jail and prosecution. By diverting eligible individuals to services, LEAD is committed to improving public safety and public order, and reducing the criminal behavior of people who participate in the program.

About LEAD
Frequently Asked Questions
LEAD Policy Coordinating Group

Funders
Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion (LEAD) is a new innovative pilot program that was developed with the community to address low-level drug and prostitution crimes in the Belltown neighborhood in Seattle and the Skyway area of unincorporated King County. LEAD will divert low-level drug and prostitution offenders into community-based treatment and support services – including housing, healthcare, job training, treatment and mental health support — instead of processing them through traditional criminal justice system avenues.

A unique coalition of law enforcement agencies, public officials, and community groups collaborated to create this pilot program. These groups make up LEAD’s Policy Coordinating Group, which governs the program.

LEAD’s goal is to improve public safety and public order, and to reduce the criminal behavior of people who participate in the program. The program will be thoroughly evaluated to determine whether it has been successful or not.

Frequently Asked Questions

Below are frequently asked questions about LEAD. If you have further questions about the program, please contact us.

What is LEAD?

LEAD is a pre-booking diversion program that allows officers to redirect low-level offenders engaged in drugs or prostitution activity to community-based services instead of jail and prosecution. LEAD participants begin working immediately with case managers to access services. LEAD’s goals are to reduce the harm a drug offender causes him or herself, as well as the harm that the individual is causing the surrounding community. This public safety program has the potential to reduce recidivism rates for low-level offenders and preserve expensive criminal justice system resources for more serious or violent offenders.

How does LEAD differ from other drug programs?

First, LEAD is the result of a commitment from law enforcement agencies, public officials, and community organizations to work together in implementing a new approach to addressing drug and prostitution activity. Second, the diversion in LEAD is made at the pre-booking stage, in the hopes of bypassing the costs and time entailed in booking, charging, and requiring court appearances of an individual. Finally, LEAD provides participants with immediate case management services, and access to additional resources not available through existing public programs.

Who is eligible for diversion into LEAD?

Individuals who are arrested for eligible offenses within specified boundaries for Belltown or Skyway may be diverted into LEAD. Eligible offenses include low-level drug offenses, and engaging in prostitution. Individuals who have certain violent offenses in their criminal history are ineligible for diversion.

Who designed LEAD?

LEAD is the result of an unusual collaboration among diverse stakeholders. Collaborators include the King County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office, the Seattle City Attorney’s Office, the Seattle Police Department, the King County Sheriff’s Office, the King County Executive, the Mayor’s Office, The Washington State Department of Corrections, The Defender Association, the ACLU of Washington, and community members. The collaboration of these stakeholders was motivated by a shared dissatisfaction with the outcomes and costs of traditional drug law enforcement.

Who runs LEAD?

As noted, LEAD is the result of a collaboration among a number of stakeholders. All stakeholders are represented on LEAD’s Policy Coordinating Group, and the group makes decisions by consensus via a memorandum of understanding. LEAD is entirely voluntary, and any stakeholder may choose to withdraw from LEAD at any time.

Who will provide services to LEAD participants?

LEAD stakeholders have contracted with Evergreen Treatment Services (ETS) to provide services to LEAD participants. ETS has provided addiction treatment services in Washington for over 30 years, and has been actively involved in federally-funded research projects. ETS’ REACH Program has been a key provider in the delivery of street outreach services to chronically homeless and chemically addicted adults in Seattle for 15 years. ETS will follow harm reduction principles and will attempt to provide immediate access to services.

How will we know if LEAD works?

All LEAD stakeholders are committed to evaluating the program rigorously. The evaluation will consider, among other factors, whether LEAD has resulted in reductions in drug use and recidivism, whether LEAD is more cost-effective than traditional criminal justice processing, and whether LEAD has had a positive impact on a community’s quality of life.

How much will LEAD cost the City of Seattle and King County?

Nothing. LEAD stakeholders obtained funding from private foundations to implement the program. Its funders include the Ford Foundation, Open Society Foundations, Vital Projects Fund, RiverStyx Foundation, Massena Foundation, and the Social Justice Fund Northwest.

Do community members support LEAD?

Community members strongly support LEAD. LEAD will be piloted first in Belltown, and then in Skyway (in partnership with the King County Sheriff’s Office). Members of both communities have participated in the program’s design, and will continue to provide feedback about the program. For example, the LEAD Community Advisory Board in Belltown includes representatives from the Belltown Community Council, Belltown Business Association, Downtown Seattle Association/Metropolitan Improvement District, Recovery Café, YWCA, Plymouth Housing Group, and Millionair Club Charity. The LEAD Community Advisory Board in Skyway includes representatives from Skyway United Methodist Church, Westhill Community Council, and Skyway Solutions.

For how long will LEAD be implemented?

LEAD formally began on October 1, 2011. The program is anticipated to run for two years before an evaluation is begun, and to continue with foundation funding for an additional two years while the evaluation is conducted and analyzed. If LEAD is found to be effective, an ongoing source of funding will be sought.

Have programs like LEAD been implemented elsewhere?

LEAD was inspired by “arrest-referral” programs in the United Kingdom. Those programs have recently been implemented in virtually every police department in the United Kingdom because pilot projects proved to be so effective.

Policy Coordinating Group
LEAD is governed by a Policy Coordinating Group. The group makes decisions by consensus via a memorandum of understanding. LEAD is entirely voluntary, and any stakeholder may choose to withdraw from LEAD at any time. The members include:

Seattle Office of the Mayor
King County Executive Office
Seattle City Council
King County Council
Seattle City Attorney’s Office
King County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office
Seattle Police Department
King County Sheriff’s Office
Washington Department of Corrections
Belltown LEAD Community Advisory Board
Skyway LEAD Community Advisory Board
The Defender Association, Racial Disparity Project
ACLU of Washington, Drug Policy Project

Funders
LEAD is currently operating as a pilot program and is being funded by private foundations. It is hoped that LEAD will eventually find permanent funding from public sources. The cost-effectiveness of the program will be studied in detail as part of the evaluation for LEAD.

Current funders include:

Ford Foundation
Open Society Foundations
Vital Projects Fund
RiverStyx Foundation
Massena Foundation
The Social Justice Fund Northwest

Read more about LEAD

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Lets Review: Jason Lajeunesse

Lajeunesse
Cool Jason Lajeunesse

From: http://www.onlythebeat.com

Once a year, Seattleites take over a few blocks of Capitol Hill to enjoy music, drinks, and the summer weather. The Capitol Hill Block Party has come to be a favorite for many who live near Seattle. Boasting three days of musical acts, the CHBP encompasses a wide variety of genres to give those attending the block party a chance to hear new music they have never heard before while at the same time bringing in a few larger top notch acts that attendees know and love.

This year is no exception with the Capitol Hill Block Party bringing in acts such as Chromeo, A$AP Ferg and Rocky, ODESZA, Spoon, and The War On Drugs to headline while flushing out the lineup with amazing up and coming acts such as RAC, Manatee Commune, Slow Magic, and many more. I was given the chance to interview the man who works tirelessly behind the scenes year round to produce the Capitol Hill Block party and operate most of your favorite clubs and music venues in Capitol Hill; Jason Lajeunesse.

Jason Lajeunesse has worked in the music industry since the mid-1990s, starting his career as a talent buyer for venues in the Pacific Northwest. Jason now is managing partner at Neumos, Moe Bar, Big Mario’s Pizza, The Comet Tavern, Barboza, Pike Street Fish Fry, Lost Lake Cafe and Lounge, and Sealed With a Kiss Presents, all of which are located in Seattle’s Capitol Hill neighborhood. In 2012, Jason became the producer and owner of the Capitol Hill Block Party (CHBP) after acting as Program Director from 2006 to 2011. That year, Seattle Magazine included Jason in their “Most Influential Seattle People” round-up. Jason has served on the Board of Directors at the Vera Project and currently serves on the Board of Directors at The Capitol Hill Chamber of Commerce. He continues to work in the music industry and ties his love of creative process, community, and business together throughout all his endeavors.

Getting to interview the owner of such an incredible festival was quite an honor for me, and after working with other members of the OTB Family, a list of questions was compiled for Mr Lajeunesse. Here for your reading pleasure then is Jason Lajeunesse on the Capitol Hill Block Party.

Read more Jason Lajeunesse

capitol hill block party, central district, ed murray, news, pierre davis, politics, seattle action network, seattle police department, spd, teens

Q & A with Capitol Hill Block Party owner, Jason Lajeunesse

From: The Ballard News Tribune

jason

By Shane Harms
07/25/2014

The Capitol Hill Block Party is set to kick off today, July 25 at 4 p.m. with the Shy Girls melting faces at the Main Stage.

The much anticipated music festival ends Monday, July 28 at 2 a.m., and some Ballardites plan to see the festival through until the finish.

The Ballard New-Tribune caught up with the Capitol Hill Block Party owner Jason Lajeunesse, and he shed light on the history and future of the party.

What are the origins of the Block Party?

The CHBP started pretty small. In 1993, a Capitol Hill skate shop called Crescent Downworks hosted a small block party with a skateboard street course and carnival games. The first official CHBP came in 1997 and had only one small stage on 10th between Pike and Union. The festival had a handful of DJs and five bands, including Flight to Mars and Mavis Piggott. Thrift store furniture was used to help seat the many attendees. We actually didn’t start doing three-day festivals until 2010, when several participating bands like Queens of the Stone Age and The Dead Weather couldn’t all play on the same day. We expanded to fit their schedules and the rest is history.

How has the CHBP evolved from its inception? Where do you see it in the future?

We started small, but today the CHBP spans across six city blocks and attracts over 9,000 people per day. As far as future plans, I don’t see the festival growing in geographical size. However, I’d love to see our online presence reach more of a global scale. I’d also like to continue to promote and support the Capitol Hill neighborhood beyond Seattle.

What does the CHBP provide for Seattle?

I’m proud of everything CHBP brings to the Seattle community on a social and economic level. It’s one of the most affordable music festivals in the country and we want to keep it that way because being an accessible festival for as many people as possible is really important. On average, we employ more than 200 people for the festival and many local restaurants and small businesses experience peak traffic during the three-day weekend. Support for some local area companies is so high that many double their work schedule to accommodate the increase in traffic. Additionally, we work directly with Capitol Hill businesses to offer discounts and promote local neighborhood businesses during the weekend. We have also raised more than $25K a year for nonprofits including Creative Advantage, an organization we’re partnering with this year that funds music and art programs in public schools. To start open the festival this year, we’re collaborating with Washington Middle School’s drum line and one of the main stage artists for an exciting opening event to the festival. From a musical standpoint, we’re committed to including both well-recognized bands and emerging artists in our lineup. We have always sought to bring exposure to the bands that come directly from the Northwest.

How do you determine which bands to offer in the line up?

Our model for booking talent is to bring in headliners that are relative to the size of the festival, but 95 percent of our programming revolves around up-and-coming acts in all genres. We always listen to fans to take into account genres or artists they are interested in hearing. We try our best to incorporate their feedback as much as we can.

What are you really excited about this year?

This year, I’m excited about the expansion of our Vera stage. We’ve invested a lot of money into expanding the talent and production for the second outdoor stage and we hope that’s something fans will be happy about. Now that it’s a proper second stage, we’ve been able to book national level artists there. It’s also open to all-ages for the first time, so even if you’re under 21 you can see some national, well-known artists.

Visit The Ballard News Tribune

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CAPITOL HILL CRIME PREVENTION WEEK – JULY 16 thru JULY 22

The Seattle Action Network would like to propose that during the Capitol Hill Block Party, that we all get together and declare “Crime Prevention Week’. The whole city should be declaring this, however they are not. So I feel maybe we will, or area by area, will make citizens become more responsible to themselves and their communities. Let’s hope so…

‘Have Fun! Support Local Businesses – Stay Safe’


Capitol Hill Block Party July 20 thru July 22

Stay Safe/Crime Prevention Week
July 16 thru July 22

Seattle Action Network.com
310-270-6887

volunteers needed