addiction, addicts, black youth, capitol hill seattle, central district, crime, crime prevention, drug overdose, drug use, drugs, education, Fentanyl, food banks, gun violence, heroin, hiv, homeless, homeless children, housing, hunger, kshama sawant, mental health, mental illness, Naloxone, narcan, Neighborhood Watch, nicklesville, opioid, overdose, paramedic, politics, seattle city council, Seattle Indian Health Board, seattle police department, sexual assault, shelters, spd, spd blotter, united way, veterans, victims, volunteer, winter food banks, winter shelters

Officials: Call 2-1-1 to help people find shelter from cold and ice

Severe Weather Winter Shelters List Here

Outreach teams from King County and the City of Seattle are on patrol around downtown and parts of Capitol Hill to help people on the streets get out of the cold. You can help by dialing 2-1-1.

The King County Emergency Services Patrol, funded by the county and the city, is “operating 24/7 during the weekend to help people who are living on the streets in downtown Seattle” and “out meeting with people who are experiencing homelessness to encourage them to come inside during the winter storm.”

But you can also help out by calling 2-1-1 to let the outreach teams know about somebody who may need help.

You can also call 9-1-1 but reports from some callers say that the emergency dispatchers haven’t treated the shelter shuttle calls as priorities.

The county and the city have increased available shelters and warming facilities through the recent storms and into next week. A roster of severe weather shelters is here.

Read more Capitol Hill Seattle Blog

addiction, addicts, burglary, drug use, drugs, heroin, homeless, prowlers, seattle action network, seattle police department, spd, spd blotter, victims

Seattle Police Department: Preventing Prowlers PSA

Preventing Prowlers PSA

It only takes a minute for an experienced thief to prowl your vehicle. Learn how you can deter thieves from targeting your neighborhood, parking garage and vehicle at http://www.seattle.gov/preventcarprowls

addiction, addicts, aids, central district, child abuse, cocaine, crime, drug use, drugs, FBI, Fentanyl, gun violence, guns, heroin, homeless, narcan, overdose, paramedic, pulsepoint, seattle action network, Seattle Indian Health Board, seattle naacp, seattle police department, seattle urban league, spd, spd blotter

Department of Justice to Launch Inaugural National Heroin and Opioid Awareness Week

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Department of Justice to Launch Inaugural National Heroin and Opioid Awareness Week

Attorney General Lynch will Travel to Lexington, Kentucky as Part of the Justice Department’s Awareness Campaign to Address the Rising Public Health Crisis of Drug Addiction

The Obama Administration is announcing a “week of action” to raise awareness about the rising public health crisis caused by drug overdoses. As part of this effort, the Department of Justice designated the week of Sept.18-23, 2016, as National Heroin and Opioid Awareness Week. Senior Department of Justice officials, members of the President’s Cabinet and other federal agencies will hold events focused on the work being done to address the national prescription opioid and heroin epidemic.

Attorney General Loretta E. Lynch will travel to Lexington, Kentucky on TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2016, to hold a youth town hall at a local high school; meet with parents who have lost their children due to overdoses and now belong to the Heroin Education Action Team (H.E.A.T.); and deliver a policy speech regarding the actions and resources the Justice Department is bringing to bear on this issue.

“The heroin and opioid epidemic is one of the most urgent law enforcement and public health challenges facing our country,” said Attorney General Lynch. “Through National Heroin and Opioid Awareness Week, the Department of Justice seeks to raise awareness and prevent new victims from succumbing to addiction; to highlight the department’s ongoing commitment to holding accountable traffickers and others responsible for this epidemic; and to help provide treatment to those grappling with addiction. To be successful in this important endeavor, we need the help of all our federal, tribal, state and local partners. In the months ahead, we will continue working to erase this scourge from our communities and to ensure a brighter future for all Americans.”

Read more FULL REPORT

crime, ed murray, Office of Professional Accountability, opa, seattle police department, spd

SPOTLIGHT: North Precinct Captain Sean O’Donnell

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PRECINCT CAPTAIN SEAN O’DONNELL

Sean O’Donnell
Captain Sean O’Donnell began his career with the Seattle Police Department in 1981. He has worked in the all of the precincts as a police officer and was a Field Training Officer. In 1986 he transferred to the Seattle Police Traffic Section as a motorcycle officer for six years. He has been assigned as a Media Relations Officer, Industrial Relations Officer, academy instructor, and was assigned as a Detective on the Mayor’s Security Detail. He was promoted to Sergeant in 2001.

As a Sergeant he worked Patrol in the West and North Precincts. He also worked in positions as a Sergeant in Communications and as a Detective Sergeant in the Office of Professional Accountability. When promoted to Lieutenant in 2006 he was assigned as a Watch Commander in the South Precinct. He has been assigned to successive positions as the East Precinct Operations Lieutenant, a West Precinct Watch Commander, and the West Precinct Operations Lieutenant.

Captain O’Donnell was promoted to Captain in 2011, and was assigned as Director for the SPD 911 Communications Section. He most recently served as commander of the Seattle Police Education and Training Section, where he and his staff worked with the federally appointed Monitoring Team and Department of Justice to “operationalize” recently changed department polices into training curriculums, which were delivered to all of the sworn members of the organization.

Captain O’Donnell received an Associate’s Degree in Criminal Justice from Shoreline Community College and a Bachelor of Arts degree in Criminal Justice from Central Washington University. He retired in 2004 from the active/reserve U.S. Army after 24 years, attaining the rank of Command Sergeant Major. He is a graduate of the U.S. Army Sergeants Major Academy. Captain O’Donnell has completed several leadership and management courses including the Senior Management Institute For Police (SMIP), the WACJTC Leadership in Police Organizations (LPO) course, and the 2013 and 2014 Summer Criminal Justice Executive Leadership Institute co-sponsored by CJTC and Seattle University. He has received certification as a Middle Manager from the Washington State Criminal Justice Training Commission.

Captain O’Donnell understands the need for strong community relationships. He believes in working collaboratively with citizens, businesses, service providers and law enforcement partners to work successfully towards the SPD Mission:

“It is the mission of the Seattle Police Department to address crime and improve quality of life through the delivery of constitutional and effective police services, and to do so in a way that reflects the values of our diverse neighborhoods.”

Captain O’Donnell was born in Seattle and was raised in northeast area of the city. He and his wife are the parents of two daughters.

central district, ed murray, education, employment, homeless, job, jobs, kshama sawant, news, schools, summer jobs, summer work, teens

Mayor’s Youth Employment Paid Summer Internships

Internship Duration: Internships typically run July 1 to august 19.

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Read more: Mayor’s Youth Employment Paid Summer Internships Inernships for Students

http://scholarship-positions.com

Mayor Murray is calling on Seattle employers to participate in the Mayor’s Youth Employment Initiative, which aims to improve connections between Seattle’s youth and employers, and increase employment

Opportunities for Seattle youth.

You can become a Proud Employer Partner in one of two ways:
1. Hire a youth intern at $11.00/hr to work part-time for 7-weeks in the Seattle Youth Employment Program, or

2. Make a contribution of $2,600 to support a youth internship slot.

Seattle Youth Employment Program – Summer Internships

7-week internship for youth ages, 16 to 24
Internships start on July 1 and end on August 19
Internship hours are up to 25 hours per week; for a total of 175 hours

All interns participate in job training preparation prior to internship and are supported by a youth staff member throughout the internship.

What can employers expect from the program?

A youth intern recruited and prepared by youth staff members for success in the workplace.

A single point of contact with a youth staff member who will work with the employer and the intern during the 7 week internship.

A match with a youth intern who best fits the skills requirements outlined by the employer.

Support for the young person on meeting employer expectations.
Support for the employer supervisor on how to best support the youth on the job.

Guidance and help with questions about hosting a youth intern.

Employers agree to:

Provide a structured work environment with clear tasks.
Provide supervision for a young person for 25 hours per week for 7 weeks this summer.
Participate in an employer supervisor orientation – in person or online.
Complete a background check.
Obtain a youth work permit for interns ages 16 and 17; (a 10-minute online application; permit is free).

Communicate with youth staff member weekly regarding intern’s engagement.

Questions? Contact Nancy Yamamoto in the Office of Economic Development: nancy.yamamoto@seattle.gov or 206-684-8189

Read more SUMMER YOUTH JOBS

employment

SPD: Pike/Pine robberies decreasing with two-fold increase in weekend police patrols

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Posted on Friday, October 10, 2014 – 8:15 pm by Bryan Cohen

A month of ramped-up of police activity to stamp out Capitol Hill robberies and assaults seems to be making an impact, or at least that was the consensus among Seattle Police top brass, including Chief Kathleen O’Toole, and a group of Capitol Hill business owners who met inside the East Precinct on Friday afternoon.

East Precinct Captain Pierre Davis said there has been a 42% decrease in street robberies over the past month as he’s doubled the weekend police presence in Pike/Pine. On Friday and Saturday nights Davis said he is now deploying up to 30 officers around the Pike/Pine area. The push required the support of the chief and Mayor Ed Murray to divert limited resources to patrolling Capitol Hill’s nightlife activity, Davis said.

Read more Capitol Hill Seattle Blog

children, peace, politics, summer jobs, summer work, teens, youth violence

Obama: Mayors, other leaders to help minority boys

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Barack Obama is broadening a program that is designed to help make young minority men’s lives better.

The White House says the “My Brother’s Keeper” initiative will begin working with mayors and tribal and community leaders to develop a “cradle to college and career strategy” for these young people. Many are at risk of not completing their educations or falling into the criminal justice system.

Obama is announcing the expansion Saturday night at the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation’s annual awards dinner in Washington.

Details will be released next week.

Obama unveiled the “My Brother’s Keeper” program at the White House in February. Businesses, foundations and community groups coordinate investments to develop or support programs geared toward young men of color. Educators and top athletes also participate.

Read more FULL ARTICLE

employment

The California Endowment: Youth Justice Policy Board

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For the California Endowment, Commonweal staffs a Youth Justice Policy Board (YJPB) of distinguished California professionals and experts in the youth justice field. The Policy Board conducts reviews of California youth justice issues, programs and policies and advises the Endowment on reform strategies.

The Policy Board has adopted two action plans:

Leadership: addresses the need for central state leadership for juvenile justice program and policy development. The focus is on building the capacity of the Board of State and Community Corrections (BSCC) as the state’s lead agency in this regard. This action plan is being implemented via a new Board of State and Community Corrections Juvenile Justice Standing Committee (JJSC Members List) on which eight members of the Youth Justice Policy Board now serve.

Juvenile justice data and performance measures: supporting upgrades of California’s outmoded juvenile justice data systems, with the objective of improving system performance measures and raising the level and quality of juvenile justice information available to stakeholders, policymakers and the public.

Health Happens Here: The Policy Board’s agenda is linked closely to the principles and objectives of the “Health Happens Here” policy framework of the Endowment, which includes these policy reform efforts:

School discipline: The Endowment has supported a collaborative effort to change school discipline policies that result in the needless suspension and expulsion of pupils who are predominantly youth of color. In 2012, this effort led to the adoption of a legislative package that revised suspension and expulsion procedures in California.

Trauma informed care: Traumatic events in children’s lives have an adverse impact on their personal, social and educational success. Endowment grantees have collaborated to disseminate research and to train justice and school personnel on trauma-informed and trauma-responsive approaches.

Equal justice: Under the Endowment’s Boys and Men of Color (BMOC) initiative (and more recently, the Sons and Brothers collaborative), grantee organizations are taking action to implement justice system and community safety reforms to reduce disproportionate incarceration and to support positive outcomes for justice-involved youth of color.

Read more FULL ARTICLE

employment

The California Wellness Foundation: Youth Violence Prevention

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Youth Prevention Chart

The California Wellness Foundation (TCWF) has been the state’s leading philanthropy tackling the problem of youth violence in California. Their Youth Violence Prevention Initiative, launched in 1993, advanced a public health model of reform addressing two main areas: reducing firearm injury and death, and increasing state resources for youth crime and violence prevention.

Commonweal has consistently promoted the TCWF priority of increasing state resources for crime and violence prevention. Commonweal has tracked state spending for youth crime and violence prevention programs since 1997 (see chart). Commonweal also played a lead role in the creation large state revenue streams supporting youth service programs, including the Schiff-Cardenas Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act (JJCPA) which has supplied more than $1.2 billion for these programs over the last 13 years.

TCWF grantees working on firearm reduction policy were successful as well—promoting new legislative controls on automatic weapons, augmenting rules on handgun safety and encouraging local ordinances to control firearm proliferation.

Though the TCWF initiative ended in 2003, the foundation has continued to provide core support grants to help organizations to sustain the policy and safety gains realized during the Initiative. As a grantee, Commonweal provides the following services:

Advising the foundation on program and policy development
Working with state and community leaders to improve supervision and re-entry programs and strategies for juvenile offenders returning to home communities
Producing detailed analyses (digests) of legislative bills pending in each session of the California legislature, including vote status, and periodic budget reports for advocates and stakeholders
Policy advocacy to support TCWF violence prevention objectives, though a well-developed network of contacts with state and local policy leaders.

Read more FULL ARTICLE

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Chokeholds: King County Sheriff John Urquhart

King County Courthouse
516 Third Ave
Room W-150
Seattle, WA 98104
(206) 296-4155
sheriff@kingcounty.gov

Attention: King County Sheriff John Urquhart

With the disturbing and unsettling recent announcement on August 4 by the Seattle Times article entitled “King County deputies restart neck-restraint training” and a report from KOMO TV 4: King Co. Sheriff’s deputies now allowed to use ‘chokeholds.

This letter is in regards to your department’s announcing continued training in the use of what is basically known as a “chokehold”.

A recent case in Staten Island New York on July 17 where a nypd officer’s use of the chokehold resulted in the death of Eric Garner could in fact, and will in fact happen here. The chokehold, ruled by a county coroner as the direct cause of death with Mr. Garner has been prohibited by New York City Police Department policy since 1993. And in the past there have been countless other deaths resulting from this apprehension technique.

If your department’s choke hold training is in fact implemented, its a matter of time before it results in fatalities. King County, the City of Seattle, nor the State of Washington are prepared to deal with the class-action lawsuits, or any other action directed straight at the king county sheriffs department, including civil unrest and any inflamed notoriety directed at this city or state.

While new ‘use of force’ decisions have to be made, whats even more important is that the ‘right’ decision is made, and not one that will result in future fatalities at the hands of king county deputies.

Ron Williams / Executive Director
Government Policies Enforcement / LEATF
Law Enforcement Accountability Task Force
http://www.gpenforcement.wordpress.com