columbine school shooting, mass shootings, parkland school shooting, school shootings

Deadline August 27: DHS proposes $1.8 million grant to provide ‘trauma training’ for students

In the wake of recent school shootings, the Department of Homeland Security has proposed a grant to implement a program aimed at teaching students how to properly “control severe bleeding” in the event of a mass casualty event.

The School-Age Trauma Training will provide $1.8 million in free trauma training sessions to the public and high schoolers in the U.S. to train people on how to help victims with a wound.

If all three phases of the program’s preparation go smoothly, it could be at least 36 months before it is officially offered.

“Uncontrolled bleeding is the number one cause of preventable death from trauma,” the grant’s proposal states. “This initiative is designed to enhance a bystander’s ability to take decisive, life-saving action to assist victims with traumatic injuries.”

John Verrico, a spokesman for the DHS’ Science and Technology Directorate, told ABC News the grant will focus on training high school students in basic first aid to use in “any sort of disaster.”

Visit ABC News for more information and Video

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JOIN: Project Safe Neighborhoods

Project Safe Neighborhoods

Gun Violence Remains a Major Problem in the United States

According to the National Crime Victimization Survey, 467,321 persons were victims of a crime committed with a firearm in 2011. In the same year, data collected by the FBI show that firearms were used in 68 percent of murders, 41 percent of robbery offenses and 21 percent of aggravated assaults nationwide.[

People between the ages of 15 and 24 are most likely to be targeted by gun violence. From 1976 to 2005, 77 percent of homicide victims ages 15-17 died from gun-related injuries. This age group was most at risk for gun violence during this time period.

Teens and young adults are more likely than persons of other ages to be murdered with a gun. Most violent gun crime, especially homicide, occurs in cities and urban communities. More information is available on the Office of Justice Programs National Institute of Justice website.

Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN) is a nationwide commitment to reduce gun crime in America by networking existing local programs that target gun crime and providing those programs with additional tools to fit the specific gun crime problems in each area. The goal is to create safer neighborhoods by reducing gun violence and sustaining that reduction.

For further information on this District’s PSN effort please contact:

Assistant U.S. Attorney Erin Becker
PSN Coordinator
206-553-7970

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Obama: Mayors, other leaders to help minority boys

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Barack Obama is broadening a program that is designed to help make young minority men’s lives better.

The White House says the “My Brother’s Keeper” initiative will begin working with mayors and tribal and community leaders to develop a “cradle to college and career strategy” for these young people. Many are at risk of not completing their educations or falling into the criminal justice system.

Obama is announcing the expansion Saturday night at the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation’s annual awards dinner in Washington.

Details will be released next week.

Obama unveiled the “My Brother’s Keeper” program at the White House in February. Businesses, foundations and community groups coordinate investments to develop or support programs geared toward young men of color. Educators and top athletes also participate.

Read more FULL ARTICLE

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The California Endowment: Youth Justice Policy Board

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For the California Endowment, Commonweal staffs a Youth Justice Policy Board (YJPB) of distinguished California professionals and experts in the youth justice field. The Policy Board conducts reviews of California youth justice issues, programs and policies and advises the Endowment on reform strategies.

The Policy Board has adopted two action plans:

Leadership: addresses the need for central state leadership for juvenile justice program and policy development. The focus is on building the capacity of the Board of State and Community Corrections (BSCC) as the state’s lead agency in this regard. This action plan is being implemented via a new Board of State and Community Corrections Juvenile Justice Standing Committee (JJSC Members List) on which eight members of the Youth Justice Policy Board now serve.

Juvenile justice data and performance measures: supporting upgrades of California’s outmoded juvenile justice data systems, with the objective of improving system performance measures and raising the level and quality of juvenile justice information available to stakeholders, policymakers and the public.

Health Happens Here: The Policy Board’s agenda is linked closely to the principles and objectives of the “Health Happens Here” policy framework of the Endowment, which includes these policy reform efforts:

School discipline: The Endowment has supported a collaborative effort to change school discipline policies that result in the needless suspension and expulsion of pupils who are predominantly youth of color. In 2012, this effort led to the adoption of a legislative package that revised suspension and expulsion procedures in California.

Trauma informed care: Traumatic events in children’s lives have an adverse impact on their personal, social and educational success. Endowment grantees have collaborated to disseminate research and to train justice and school personnel on trauma-informed and trauma-responsive approaches.

Equal justice: Under the Endowment’s Boys and Men of Color (BMOC) initiative (and more recently, the Sons and Brothers collaborative), grantee organizations are taking action to implement justice system and community safety reforms to reduce disproportionate incarceration and to support positive outcomes for justice-involved youth of color.

Read more FULL ARTICLE

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Stop The Violence Day

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STOP THE VIOLENCE DAY 2013

To: Local Pastors, Ministers and Clergy
From: Project FORWARD
Re: Citywide “Stop the Violence Day” in Houston

October 9, 2013

I pray this letter reaches you in the best of health and spirits. Let me first thank you for all that you do to make our community a better place. We would like to unite with you in that effort, particularly to help stop the senseless violence that appears to be getting worse every day.

In the spirit of unity and solidarity, a group of Black men and organizations have come together and declared Sunday, October 27th, “Citywide Stop the Violence/ Respect for Life Day.” It is a day of remembrance of those who have lost their lives to senseless violence and a day of support for their families. We believe that the church plays a critical role in a unified effort to eradicate the “spirit of Cain” in our community. We must come together. None of us can do it alone.

We are humbly seeking 100 pastors of 100 churches to incorporate a message of “Stop the Violence” into their sermon on the Sunday morning of October 27th. How wonderful would it be to see us as a community speaking with ONE VOICE against this violence on the same day at the same time. We have a group of committed men who have pledged to hit the streets, as well as the airwaves, to encourage as many Black men, boys and youth as we can to attend a church on that Sunday to hear the message. We will encourage single mothers, grandmothers and others to bring their young men to the various houses of worship that day to hear this special message.

Please consider joining us in this noble effort. In doing so, you will be joining thousands across the city in sending a strong message of peace in the streets. If we save ONE LIFE in the process then our work will not have been in vain. Please join us by committing to incorporate a “Stop the Violence” message into your sermon on October 27th. Please email us at info@projectforwardhouston.com to confirm your church’s participation. Thank you.

Deloyd Parker
SHAPE Community Center

Deric Muhammad
Community Activist

Loretta Brock, Coordinator
The Great Awakening 2013
(832)572-2521 Please feel free to call her for additional info.

Note: If your church or organization is interested in being a partner in “Stop the Violence Day” please email us at info@projectforward.com.

children, schools, youth violence

Seattle Weekly: Ralph Fascitelli of Washington Ceasefire Talks Gun Control in The Wake of Newtown Massacre

CEASEFIRE
The tragedy in Newtown, Conn. rocked our nation. And for good reason. Rarely – even in a world where such senseless acts of violence seem more and more prevalent – are we faced with a horror the scale of what transpired Friday at Sandy Hook Elementary School.

FULL STORY

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Offering Protection and Comfort for Kids in the Wake of Latest Shooting Tragedy

From: PBS.org

How can parents and schools keep kids safe, and how can they reassure them when tragedies occur? Judy Woodruff speaks with a panel of experts, including Stephen Brock of California State University, Dewey Cornell of University of Virginia and Mo Canady of the National Association of School Resource Officials.

FULL STORY

children, schools, youth violence

Help for victims of Sandy Hook Shooting

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An official fund for victims’ families, and the community as a whole, has now been established: The Sandy Hook School Support Fund, set up by the United Way of Western Connecticut will provide support services to families and the community. All donations to this fund will go directly to those affected.

FULL STORY

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Map: Weapons in Washington state schools

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Darker colors represent higher rates for students suspended or expelled for weapons incidents during the 2010-11 school year, the most recent numbers available. Click on each district on the map for more detailed numbers.

see the map here

Also from: CNN

10 ways to put brakes on mass shootings in schools

A gunman opened fire Friday in a Connecticut elementary school, killing 26 people, 20 of them children, police said. It was one of the deadliest school shootings in U.S. history.

Readers posted more than 2,000 comments in response to questions we asked them in a story examining immediate shock and anger surrounding the incident. They looked at what problems might be involved and how society might go about solving them. Here are 10 of the most popular suggestions.

see the 10 ways

employment

Connie Rice: Advancement Project – Leadership

Advancement Project

In her legal work, Connie has led multi-racial coalitions of lawyers and clients to win more than $10 billion in damages and policy changes, through traditional class action civil rights cases redressing police misconduct, race and sex discrimination and unfair public policy in transportation, probation and public housing.

She filed a landmark case on behalf of low-income bus riders that resulted in a mandate that more than 2 billion dollars be spent to improve the bus system. Together with Co-Directors Molly Munger and Steve English, Connie launched a coalition lawsuit, Godinez v. Davis, that won approximately $1 billion for new school construction in Los Angeles and other urban areas – money previously slated for less crowded, more affluent suburban school districts.

With these funds the Los Angeles Unified School District began its nationally recognized program to build over 66 new schools since 2001.

After the court in Godinez required California to develop a new system for funding schools construction, Advancement Project was instrumental in assessing the need for adequate schools to serve all children in California and in crafting and shepherding three school construction bond initiatives that raised $25 billion for new and renovated facilities throughout the state, including $5 billion earmarked to relieve overcrowding in urban schools. This funding enabled California to build or renovate over 1 million school spaces since 2000. Connie then chaired the Independent Prop. BB Citizens’ Bond Oversight Committee that monitored and evaluated how Los Angeles Unified School District used its allocation of school construction funds.

At the invitation of LAPD Chief William Bratton, Connie investigated the biggest police corruption scandal in Los Angeles history and obtained the commitment of the Chief to reform LAPD’s training and incentives system through an internal commission that she co-chairs. Connie also conducted a landmark 18-month assessment of the City of Los Angeles’ anti-gang programs and drew the blueprint to reduce gang violence through a regional, multi-jurisdictional comprehensive strategy to right the balance between suppression and prevention.

Prior to co-founding Advancement Project, Connie was Co-Director of the Los Angeles office of the NAACP Legal Defense & Educational Fund, an associate at the law firm of Morrison & Foerster; and a clerk to the Honorable Damon J. Keith, judge of the United States Court of Appeals, Sixth Circuit. Connie is a graduate of Harvard College and the New York University School of Law.

In 2006, Los Angeles Times West Magazine named Connie one of the 100 most powerful people in Southern California, and California Law Business twice been named her one of the top 10 most influential lawyers in California. Connie serves on the boards of the Public Policy Institute of California and public radio station KPCC.