addiction, addicts, capitol hill seattle, central district, cocaine, cpr, crime, drug use, drugs, drunk drivers, dui, education, Fentanyl, heroin, mental health, mental illness, Naloxone, narcan, Neighborhood Watch, overdose, Pierce County Sheriff's Department, seattle action network, seattle police department, sheriffs, spd, spd blotter, veterans

Flashback – Naloxone: Seattle Police Officers Revive Drug Overdose Victim

Original Published on May 23, 2017

Police responded to a report of a man down in the 1500 block of 9th Avenue just before midnight and were quickly flagged down by a woman. The woman pointed officers to a man lying on the sidewalk, and said he had recently used heroin.

Officer Jared Levitt and Sergeant Dave Hockett saw the 40-year-old man was struggling to breathe and gave him a dose of nasal naloxone and began CPR a short time later.

SFD medics arrived and took over treatment of the man, who regained consciousness and was taken to Harborview Medical Center for treatment.

This incident marks the 16th time officers have used Naloxone since Seattle police began carrying it in mid-March. The case will become part of the ongoing study conducted by the University of Washington into SPD’s use of Naloxone for a possible department-wide deployment.

As a reminder, Washington law provides immunity from criminal drug possession charges for anyone seeking medical aid for themselves or someone else experiencing an overdose.

See the Video

addiction, addicts, central district, children, cpr, drug use, drugs, education, health fair, heroin, hiv, homeless, mental health, mental illness, narcan, overdose, seattle action network, Seattle Indian Health Board, teens, veterans, women of color

Oct 27-Oct 30 Huge, free health clinic running again this week at Seattle Center

Huge, free health clinic running again this week at Seattle Center

KeyArena is located at Seattle Center, 305 Harrison St., Seattle.

For more information, visit http://www.seattlecenter.org/patients or call 206-684-7200.

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children, health fair, mental health, mental illness, paramedic, pulsepoint, seattle action network, teens, veterans, women of color

Seattle/King County Clinic at KeyArena at Seattle Center October 27-30, 2016

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The next Seattle/King County Clinic is scheduled for October 27-30, 2016 and has a goal of providing $3.5 million in services to 4,000 patients.

Seattle/King County Clinic brings together healthcare organizations, civic agencies, non-profits, private businesses and volunteers from across the State of Washington to produce a giant free health clinic in KeyArena at Seattle Center.

The four-day volunteer-driven clinic provides a full range of free dental, vision and medical care to underserved and vulnerable populations in the region.

bruce harrell, central district, children, ed murray, homeless, hunger, job, jobs, mental health, nicklesville, seattle police department, teens

Concerning homeless youth prevention and protection.

HB 1436 – 2015-16

Concerning homeless youth prevention and protection.

History of the Bill

Sponsors: Representatives Kagi, Zeiger, Robinson, Walsh, Walkinshaw, Pettigrew, Senn, Johnson, Orwall, Ortiz-Self, Reykdal, Carlyle, Gregerson, Appleton, Fitzgibbon, Ormsby, Clibborn, Jinkins, Bergquist, Goodman, McBride, Pollet, Riccelli, Kilduff
By Request: Governor Inslee
Companion Bill: SB 5404

2015 REGULAR SESSION
Jan 21 First reading, referred to Early Learning & Human Services (Not Officially read and referred until adoption of Introduction report). (View Original Bill)
Feb 4 Public hearing in the House Committee on Early Learning & Human Services at 1:30 PM. (Committee Materials)
Feb 10 Executive action taken in the House Committee on Early Learning & Human Services at 8:00 AM. (Committee Materials)
ELHS – Executive action taken by committee.
ELHS – Majority; 1st substitute bill be substituted, do pass. (View 1st Substitute) (Majority Report)
Minority; do not pass. (Minority Report)
Minority; without recommendation. (Minority Report)
Feb 12 Referred to Appropriations.
Feb 24 Public hearing in the House Committee on Appropriations at 1:30 PM. (Committee Materials)
Feb 26 Executive action taken in the House Committee on Appropriations at 9:00 AM. (Committee Materials)
APP – Majority; 2nd substitute bill be substituted, do pass. (View 2nd Substitute) (Majority Report)
Minority; do not pass. (Minority Report)
Minority; without recommendation. (Minority Report)
Feb 27 Referred to Rules 2 Review.
Mar 3 Placed on second reading by Rules Committee.
Mar 4 2nd substitute bill substituted (APP 15). (View 2nd Substitute)
Rules suspended. Placed on Third Reading.
Third reading, passed; yeas, 62; nays, 36; absent, 0; excused, 0. (View Roll Calls)
IN THE SENATE
Mar 6 First reading, referred to Human Services, Mental Health & Housing.
Mar 24 Public hearing in the Senate Committee on Human Services and Mental Health & Housing at 10:00 AM. (Committee Materials)
Apr 24 By resolution, returned to House Rules Committee for third reading.
2015 1ST SPECIAL SESSION
IN THE HOUSE
Apr 29 By resolution, reintroduced and retained in present status.
2015 2ND SPECIAL SESSION
May 29 By resolution, reintroduced and retained in present status.
2015 3RD SPECIAL SESSION
Jun 28 By resolution, reintroduced and retained in present status.

http://app.leg.wa.gov/billinfo/summary.aspx?year=2015&bill=1436

children, peace, politics, summer jobs, summer work, teens, youth violence

Obama: Mayors, other leaders to help minority boys

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Barack Obama is broadening a program that is designed to help make young minority men’s lives better.

The White House says the “My Brother’s Keeper” initiative will begin working with mayors and tribal and community leaders to develop a “cradle to college and career strategy” for these young people. Many are at risk of not completing their educations or falling into the criminal justice system.

Obama is announcing the expansion Saturday night at the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation’s annual awards dinner in Washington.

Details will be released next week.

Obama unveiled the “My Brother’s Keeper” program at the White House in February. Businesses, foundations and community groups coordinate investments to develop or support programs geared toward young men of color. Educators and top athletes also participate.

Read more FULL ARTICLE

employment

The California Endowment: Youth Justice Policy Board

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For the California Endowment, Commonweal staffs a Youth Justice Policy Board (YJPB) of distinguished California professionals and experts in the youth justice field. The Policy Board conducts reviews of California youth justice issues, programs and policies and advises the Endowment on reform strategies.

The Policy Board has adopted two action plans:

Leadership: addresses the need for central state leadership for juvenile justice program and policy development. The focus is on building the capacity of the Board of State and Community Corrections (BSCC) as the state’s lead agency in this regard. This action plan is being implemented via a new Board of State and Community Corrections Juvenile Justice Standing Committee (JJSC Members List) on which eight members of the Youth Justice Policy Board now serve.

Juvenile justice data and performance measures: supporting upgrades of California’s outmoded juvenile justice data systems, with the objective of improving system performance measures and raising the level and quality of juvenile justice information available to stakeholders, policymakers and the public.

Health Happens Here: The Policy Board’s agenda is linked closely to the principles and objectives of the “Health Happens Here” policy framework of the Endowment, which includes these policy reform efforts:

School discipline: The Endowment has supported a collaborative effort to change school discipline policies that result in the needless suspension and expulsion of pupils who are predominantly youth of color. In 2012, this effort led to the adoption of a legislative package that revised suspension and expulsion procedures in California.

Trauma informed care: Traumatic events in children’s lives have an adverse impact on their personal, social and educational success. Endowment grantees have collaborated to disseminate research and to train justice and school personnel on trauma-informed and trauma-responsive approaches.

Equal justice: Under the Endowment’s Boys and Men of Color (BMOC) initiative (and more recently, the Sons and Brothers collaborative), grantee organizations are taking action to implement justice system and community safety reforms to reduce disproportionate incarceration and to support positive outcomes for justice-involved youth of color.

Read more FULL ARTICLE

bruce harrell, homeless, mental health, seattle action network, spd

Federal judge approves of new Seattle Police Department Crisis Intervention Policy

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Federal judge approves of new SPD Crisis Intervention Policy
February 12, 2014

Yesterday, U.S. District Judge James L Robart approved a newly developed Crisis Intervention Policy for the Seattle Police Department that is designed to better prepare officers in dealing with mentally ill or drug affected people. The policy becomes official on March 3, 2014 and training will begin shortly thereafter.

The Mayor said of the new policy: “People experiencing a behavioral crisis are victims who deserve of our care and attention, and our SPD officers deserve clear expectations for how to approach and interact with those in this kind of situation. The many lessons learned from the tragic John T. Williams shooting have helped inform the Department’s new crisis intervention policy, which I believe will be of significant help to officers as they face these kinds of encounters in the future.”

A full press release from the Department of Justice about the new policy and it’s federal approval is in full here:

DOJ AND CITY HAIL FEDERAL JUDGE’S APPROVAL OF THE NEW SEATTLE POLICE DEPARTMENT CRISIS INTERVENTION POLICY

Policy Sets New Procedures and Training for Officers Dealing with Mentally Ill or Drug Affected Individuals

U.S. District Judge James L. Robart today approved a new Crisis Intervention Policy for the Seattle Police Department, announced U.S. Attorney Jenny A. Durkan. The policy, developed with local, regional and nationally-recognized experts in the fields of mental health and drug addiction, is designed to improve community safety and provide officers with the guidance and training they need to treat those having a behavioral crisis with dignity and respect, and to resolve crisis incidents by connecting those individuals with community services that can provide long-term stabilizing support. One key component of the policy calls for officers to de-escalate the situation when feasible and reasonable.

The new policy will become the official policy of the Seattle Police Department on March 3, 2014, and initial training to the policy will begin soon thereafter.“SPD’s data shows that far too many situations requiring force involve people suffering from mental health or substance abuse issues. This new policy creates critical new organizational and operational changes for the Seattle Police Department that will guide and help officers when dealing with such individuals,” said U.S. Attorney Jenny A. Durkan. “The phased approach is a model for urban policing. While all officers will be trained, selected officers will be certified with advanced training to manage the scene when dealing with a person in crisis. A crisis response team will follow up on criminal investigations where mental illness is suspected. These organizational and operational changes are recognized as best practices at the best law enforcement agencies in the nation. We thank the members of the Crisis Intervention Committee (and their sponsoring agencies) for the time they generously spent in diligently and carefully helping to craft these policies.”

The new policy was developed over months of work by the Crisis Intervention Committee (CIC), composed of mental and behavioral health experts: providers, clinicians, advocates, academics, outside law enforcement representatives, members of the Seattle Police Department (SPD) and the judiciary. The CIC was created in 2013 to provide a problem-solving forum for interagency issues, including the development of policy, the evaluation of training for SPD’s officers engaged with this population, and the collection of data and other information to track systemic failures in providing the available services.

“People experiencing a behavioral crisis are victims who deserve of our care and attention, and our SPD officers deserve clear expectations for how to approach and interact with those in this kind of situation,” said Seattle Mayor Ed Murray. “The many lessons learned from the tragic John T. Williams shooting have helped inform the Department’s new crisis intervention policy, which I believe will be of significant help to officers as they face these kinds of encounters in the future.”

The policy creates the position of a Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) coordinator, Lt. Marty Rivera, who is appointed by the Chief of Police and provides command-level oversight of the Crisis Intervention Program and, who is the primary point of contact for the mental health provider/clinician/advocacy community for the SPD.

The Crisis Intervention Program consists of three distinct levels of expertise: all line patrol officers who will receive basic training on crisis intervention; the “certified” Crisis Intervention officers; and the follow-up Crisis Response Team. To become a CIT “certified” officer, those officers must take a 40 hour crisis intervention course with a certification exam and complete additional annual training. A CIT-certified officer will be dispatched to every scene where the police communications center suspects a behavioral crisis and, for the first time, will take primary responsibility at the scene of crisis events. The Crisis Response Team is tasked with following up on officer encounters with those enduring a crisis to assess that appropriate services are in place.

“The new Crisis Intervention Policy gives my officers clear guidelines and resources when they encounter people who are experiencing behavioral crisis,” said Interim Seattle Police Chief Harry Bailey. “This policy also provides access and resources to a vulnerable population. As police officers we are also charged with community care taking duties and this new policy works in concert with that philosophy and will provide officers with the necessary training and tools to help people that are in need of those services. I want to thank the Crisis Intervention Committee for helping us reach another milestone in the DOJ settlement agreement.”

Also, for the first time, officers will be required to collect data on every encounter they have with individuals in behavioral crisis, again to systematically track and assess the deployment and effectiveness of resources.

The Justice Department’s investigation in 2011 found that SPD’s patterns of excessive force often arose from encounters with persons with mental illnesses or those under the influence of alcohol or drugs. This finding was particularly troubling because, by its own estimates, 70% of SPD’s use of force during that time period involved these populations.

Press inquiries regarding the DOJ/SPD consent decree should be directed to Colleen Bernier at (206) 553-7970 or Colleen.Bernier@usdoj.gov. Ms. Bernier will determine the appropriate person to respond.

– Read FULL REPORT

children, education, schools

Offering Protection and Comfort for Kids in the Wake of Latest Shooting Tragedy

From: PBS.org

How can parents and schools keep kids safe, and how can they reassure them when tragedies occur? Judy Woodruff speaks with a panel of experts, including Stephen Brock of California State University, Dewey Cornell of University of Virginia and Mo Canady of the National Association of School Resource Officials.

FULL STORY

children, schools, youth violence

Help for victims of Sandy Hook Shooting

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An official fund for victims’ families, and the community as a whole, has now been established: The Sandy Hook School Support Fund, set up by the United Way of Western Connecticut will provide support services to families and the community. All donations to this fund will go directly to those affected.

FULL STORY

employment

How One Homeless Teenage Mother Broke the Cycle of Poverty


Since Superstorm Sandy pounded the East Coast, New Jersey food banks are in high demand, some feeding twice as many families as before, npr.org reports. And as Thanksgiving approaches, some food banks are struggling to bring turkeys to their families’ tables.

The Food Bank of Monmouth and Ocean County has distributed over 250,000 meals in the last two weeks alone, executive director Carlos Rodriguez told nj.com.

FULL STORY