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SPD: Back to School Youth Safety Tips: Metro, Sound Transit Safety & more..

Safety at School

Safety at school should be your number one priority.
Report all crimes and suspicious activities to school staff and police.
Always say no to things that make you uncomfortable.
If you see or receive information about a gun on school campus, get to safety and call 9-1-1 immediately.

Safety on Metro/Sound Transit Routes

Pay attention to your surroundings when walking to or from transit stops and on buses or trains.
Thieves on transit are on the lookout for cellphones, jewelry or other valuables.
If there is a problem on the bus or train, notify the driver and/or call 911.
Keep all personal belongings close by.
If you have concerns about safety at or near your stop, contact your driver or call 911.

Street Smarts

Know your transit routes.
If a person or group makes you feel uncomfortable, cross the street, walk in another direction, or ask other people you trust to walk with you.
Make eye contact with people around you carry yourself with confidence.

If you are Targeted in a Crime

If someone tries to grab you, make a scene. Scream, kick, fight . . . Depending on the situation, do what you feel is right to get away.
If someone demands your wallet or phone it’s always safer to hand it over than risk injury.
Seek help from a neighbor, business or bystander as quickly as you can and call 9-1-1.

REad more Seattle Police Department Website

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Deadline August 27: DHS proposes $1.8 million grant to provide ‘trauma training’ for students

In the wake of recent school shootings, the Department of Homeland Security has proposed a grant to implement a program aimed at teaching students how to properly “control severe bleeding” in the event of a mass casualty event.

The School-Age Trauma Training will provide $1.8 million in free trauma training sessions to the public and high schoolers in the U.S. to train people on how to help victims with a wound.

If all three phases of the program’s preparation go smoothly, it could be at least 36 months before it is officially offered.

“Uncontrolled bleeding is the number one cause of preventable death from trauma,” the grant’s proposal states. “This initiative is designed to enhance a bystander’s ability to take decisive, life-saving action to assist victims with traumatic injuries.”

John Verrico, a spokesman for the DHS’ Science and Technology Directorate, told ABC News the grant will focus on training high school students in basic first aid to use in “any sort of disaster.”

Visit ABC News for more information and Video