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Officer Performs CPR on Man Overdosing, Saves Life

Officer Performs CPR on Man Overdosing, Saves Life
Written by Detective Mark Jamieson on April 20, 2017 11:24 am

Just before 2:00 am Thursday morning officers responded to a report of a man overdosing in an abandoned house in the 1000 block of E. Republican Street. Officer Do located a woman inside the house, calling for medics and screaming that someone was dying. Officer Do entered the house and located an unconscious man lying on the floor. The man was not breathing and did not have a detectable pulse. Officer Do immediately began CPR on the man and continued until he regained consciousness. Seattle Fire personnel arrived and provided the man with additional medical aid. The 37-year-old man was treated at the scene and later transported to the hospital for further evaluation.

As a reminder, Washington law provides immunity from criminal drug possession charges for anyone seeking medical aid for themselves or someone else experiencing an overdose.

Read more SPD Website

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Section 8 voucher applications start Apr. 5

KCHA’s Section 8 voucher program will accept free, online-only applications from 12:01 a.m. on Wednesday, Apr. 5, 2017 through 4 p.m. on Tuesday, Apr. 18, 2017. A random lottery drawing will be used to select 3,500 of these applications for the Section 8 waiting list. Lottery details in አማርኛ, Farsi, ភាសាខ្មែរ, Русский, af Soomaali, Español, ትግርኛ & Tiếng Việt.

This FAQ can help answer your questions about applying for KCHA’s Section 8 voucher program. If you have additional questions after reading these questions, call the Section 8 office at (206) 214-1300 during normal business hours – 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday through Friday.

Read more King County Sec 8 Website

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City of Seattle: Student Opportunities!

Welcome to the City of Seattle’s Student Opportunities!

We will be updating the Job Opportunities page later this month, to make it easier for you to find the right job.

Most of our recruiting for internships is done in the first two weeks of:

February (for Spring Quarter)
April (for Summer Quarter)
August (for Fall Quarter)
November (for Winter Quarter)

You can now apply online by clicking on the job title you are interested in and clicking on the “Apply” link! If this is the first time you are applying using our online job application, you will need to create an account and select a Username and Password. After your account has been established, you can build an application by clicking on the “Build Job Application” link. This application can be saved and used to apply for more than one job opening.

Please note that some student employment opportunities may require that you have a work study award from a Washington State college. Funding for these positions comes from a state student financial aid program and is only available to students eligible to receive work study funds. If you are applying for a work study position, please make sure to upload a copy of your work study award letter (authorization or referral form) to your application.

Student positions are not eligible for benefits unless specifically noted in the job announcement.

Read more FULL REPORT

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Councilmember Bagshaw on Opiate Addiction Taskforce Findings

Councilmember Sally Bagshaw (District 7, Pioneer Square to Magnolia) issued the following statement following the release of the Opiate Addiction Task Force’s recommendations:

“Opiate addiction is a terrible reality, and it’s a problem that we have seen across the nation. Addiction clearly exacerbates the struggle for those seeking to overcome homelessness, which is why I’m so heartened to receive the Opiate Addiction Task Force’s findings. My goal as a Seattle/King County Board of Public Health member is to implement proven best practices in Seattle to reverse this opioid crisis and provide tested options for people.

“I’m particularly drawn to the Task Force’s recommendation that we enhance access to buprenorphine, which is an effective tool to treat opioid addiction. As Council considers next year’s annual City budget, I intend to identify funding for a Belltown facility that will provide professional buprenorphine access for those looking to conquer or suppress their addictions.

“I witnessed firsthand the success of a similar buprenorphine program on my study mission to San Francisco this past May. With clinical help and a physician’s counseling, buprenorphine can be obtained through pharmacies or health clinics across San Francisco. When addicts are ready to seek treatment, they should not be put on a wait list—they need treatment right away. That’s why we need ‘treatment on demand’ to dramatically reduce the number of people addicted to heroin. Bupe is one of the alternatives that works.

Read more FULL REPORT

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Saturday July 23 – National Police Activities League presents a Free Jr. NBA Camp Seattle

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National Police Activities League presents a Free Jr. NBA Camp Seattle – 10-16 Years old

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ATTENTION: Boys & Girls Basketball Players
Ages 10-16

Join Former NBA Greats for a FREE Youth Basketball & Mentoring Clinic
WHO: NBA/Jr. NBA, National PAL, Leadership Foundation
WHAT: Full Court Press: Prep for Success Basketball/Life Skills Clinic
WHEN: Saturday, July 23, 2016 from 9:00am – 3:00pm
WHERE: The Rainier Community Center• 4600 38th Avenue S. Seattle, WA 98118

Call or email Cindy Sandino-Chang 206-551-7316 to reserve your spot. cindy.sandino-chang@seattle.gov

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Mayor Murray addresses police reform and accountability

Mayor Murray addresses police reform and accountability
July 7, 2016 by Office of the Mayor

Today, Mayor Ed Murray delivered the following remarks regarding the deaths of Philando Castile and Alton Sterling, and police reform and accountability:

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As I have said many times before, the issue of race and racism is the greatest challenge we face as a country, particularly as racism impacts the black community.

This week, within 24 hours, two black men, Philando Castile and Alton Sterling were killed by police officers.

I am deeply disturbed by police action resulting in the death of any person. And today my thoughts are with the victims’ families, children, and loved ones during this extremely difficult and sad time.

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I know the black community are walking with a heavy heart and a sense of outrage, injustice and fear. Had Castile or Sterling been white, I believe they would still be here with us today.

Their deaths are two in a long line of tragedies that feed mistrust between communities of color and the police, particularly the mothers, fathers, brothers, sisters and children of black men.

As I have said on the night of the Ferguson grand jury verdict, we cannot let this gulf of mistrust divide us and continue to cause this fear and pain.

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This is why we must get police reform right in Seattle.

The Department of Justice should lead the investigations into these killings.

The shooting deaths of black men at the hands of police have brought the attention of the Department of Justice to many cities across the nation, including our own.

Since I became mayor, this City has been committed to working with the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice and the federal courts to make dramatic reforms in the Seattle Police Department to comply with the federally mandated consent decree.

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In partnership with the Department of Justice and the Federal Monitor that oversees our consent decree, we are creating a model Force Review Board that is being replicated across the country.

The Force Review Board reviews every serious use of force by a Seattle Police Officer. And present at every Force Review Board are representatives from the Department of Justice, the Monitoring Team, a civilian representative from the Office of Professional Accountability, and a citizen observer.

So unlike Minneapolis or Louisiana, the Department of Justice is already here, and we are working with them closely to create best practices in reviewing police uses of force.

Where other jurisdictions are just now contemplating where to start, we are already well down the road of reform, and other cities are coming to us to learn from our experience.

In fact, Chief O’Toole is in D.C. today at the Center of Policing Equity to speak at an event sponsored by the Department of Justice about the issues of race and policing.

In the coming months, I will send legislation to Seattle City Council that will expand and strengthen civilian oversight and independent review of the Seattle Police Department.

It is my goal to create a permanent citizen oversight commission that is the strongest in this city’s history.

It is my goal to create a more independent director of the police accountability process, on the model of the ethics and elections commission, which is completely independent of the mayor and council.

It is my goal to create a stronger auditor of the police discipline process on the model of an inspector general, with greater authority to investigate complaints.

And we will use a community process similar to the one used to hire Chief O’Toole to hire for these new roles.

As we move forward, our conversation cannot be about blaming black men, it must be about changing our institutions and systems.

As a white man, I stand as an ally in solidary with the black community.

But I cannot pretend to know their experience.

I cannot know the experience of black men and women everywhere, who live everyday with the fear that one small action of their part could make them the next victim.

I cannot know the experience of raising a black child in our society, and the daily worry that today might be the day they do not come home because they were taken by a bullet.

What I do know is that white Americans have work to do. We, the beneficiaries of hundreds of years of structural inequality, must use our privilege to construct a more just society.

This has been my commitment every single day as mayor.

Everything we have accomplished during my time in this office…

…pre-k, the minimum wage, transit, priority hire, parks and community centers, police reform, summer youth employment, our education summit…

…they are our response to addressing the issue of race and inequality.

To Seattle’s residents of color, your city cares about you. Your lives matter. The fact that we even need to state that Black Lives Matter is the result of our failure to address racism in our society.

To white residents of Seattle, let us work with our sisters and brothers of color to end structural and institutional racism.”

– See more at: http://murray.seattle.gov/mayor-murray-addresses-police-reform-and-accountability/#sthash.ARaN9TA2.IRKcdSfy.dpuf

Mayor delivers remarks on officer involved shootings
7/7/201631:11

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray delivers remarks on the recent officer involved shootings in Louisiana and Minnesota.

http://www.seattlechannel.org/embedvideoplayer?videoid=x66208

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Capitol Hill Block Party 2015 – Stay Safe!

2011.07.23: Capitol Hill Block Party, Seattle, WA

From: Capitol Hill Seattle Blog
By Bryan Cohen

This year, Capitol Hill Block Party won’t be competing with the Timber Outdoor Music Festival in Carnation, as the 2015 edition of yet another Pacific Northwest music festival took place last weekend. Still, CHBP owner and producer Jason Lajeunesse said the flood of music industry cash into festivals — one of the few highly profitable corners left in the business — is increasingly having an effect on CHBP. “It’s been challenging to book the types of acts that we want to attract,” he said. “Overall, expenses have doubled over the past five years.”

In response, CHBP is looking a little more Capitol Hill in 2015. It started in March, when organizers rolled out new branding for the festival’s 19th installment, featuring a map-inspired logo representing CHBP’s Pike/Pine venue.

Read more FULL REPORT

Visit the Capitol Hill Block Party website

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SPD: Pike/Pine robberies decreasing with two-fold increase in weekend police patrols

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Posted on Friday, October 10, 2014 – 8:15 pm by Bryan Cohen

A month of ramped-up of police activity to stamp out Capitol Hill robberies and assaults seems to be making an impact, or at least that was the consensus among Seattle Police top brass, including Chief Kathleen O’Toole, and a group of Capitol Hill business owners who met inside the East Precinct on Friday afternoon.

East Precinct Captain Pierre Davis said there has been a 42% decrease in street robberies over the past month as he’s doubled the weekend police presence in Pike/Pine. On Friday and Saturday nights Davis said he is now deploying up to 30 officers around the Pike/Pine area. The push required the support of the chief and Mayor Ed Murray to divert limited resources to patrolling Capitol Hill’s nightlife activity, Davis said.

Read more Capitol Hill Seattle Blog

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Federal judge approves of new Seattle Police Department Crisis Intervention Policy

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Federal judge approves of new SPD Crisis Intervention Policy
February 12, 2014

Yesterday, U.S. District Judge James L Robart approved a newly developed Crisis Intervention Policy for the Seattle Police Department that is designed to better prepare officers in dealing with mentally ill or drug affected people. The policy becomes official on March 3, 2014 and training will begin shortly thereafter.

The Mayor said of the new policy: “People experiencing a behavioral crisis are victims who deserve of our care and attention, and our SPD officers deserve clear expectations for how to approach and interact with those in this kind of situation. The many lessons learned from the tragic John T. Williams shooting have helped inform the Department’s new crisis intervention policy, which I believe will be of significant help to officers as they face these kinds of encounters in the future.”

A full press release from the Department of Justice about the new policy and it’s federal approval is in full here:

DOJ AND CITY HAIL FEDERAL JUDGE’S APPROVAL OF THE NEW SEATTLE POLICE DEPARTMENT CRISIS INTERVENTION POLICY

Policy Sets New Procedures and Training for Officers Dealing with Mentally Ill or Drug Affected Individuals

U.S. District Judge James L. Robart today approved a new Crisis Intervention Policy for the Seattle Police Department, announced U.S. Attorney Jenny A. Durkan. The policy, developed with local, regional and nationally-recognized experts in the fields of mental health and drug addiction, is designed to improve community safety and provide officers with the guidance and training they need to treat those having a behavioral crisis with dignity and respect, and to resolve crisis incidents by connecting those individuals with community services that can provide long-term stabilizing support. One key component of the policy calls for officers to de-escalate the situation when feasible and reasonable.

The new policy will become the official policy of the Seattle Police Department on March 3, 2014, and initial training to the policy will begin soon thereafter.“SPD’s data shows that far too many situations requiring force involve people suffering from mental health or substance abuse issues. This new policy creates critical new organizational and operational changes for the Seattle Police Department that will guide and help officers when dealing with such individuals,” said U.S. Attorney Jenny A. Durkan. “The phased approach is a model for urban policing. While all officers will be trained, selected officers will be certified with advanced training to manage the scene when dealing with a person in crisis. A crisis response team will follow up on criminal investigations where mental illness is suspected. These organizational and operational changes are recognized as best practices at the best law enforcement agencies in the nation. We thank the members of the Crisis Intervention Committee (and their sponsoring agencies) for the time they generously spent in diligently and carefully helping to craft these policies.”

The new policy was developed over months of work by the Crisis Intervention Committee (CIC), composed of mental and behavioral health experts: providers, clinicians, advocates, academics, outside law enforcement representatives, members of the Seattle Police Department (SPD) and the judiciary. The CIC was created in 2013 to provide a problem-solving forum for interagency issues, including the development of policy, the evaluation of training for SPD’s officers engaged with this population, and the collection of data and other information to track systemic failures in providing the available services.

“People experiencing a behavioral crisis are victims who deserve of our care and attention, and our SPD officers deserve clear expectations for how to approach and interact with those in this kind of situation,” said Seattle Mayor Ed Murray. “The many lessons learned from the tragic John T. Williams shooting have helped inform the Department’s new crisis intervention policy, which I believe will be of significant help to officers as they face these kinds of encounters in the future.”

The policy creates the position of a Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) coordinator, Lt. Marty Rivera, who is appointed by the Chief of Police and provides command-level oversight of the Crisis Intervention Program and, who is the primary point of contact for the mental health provider/clinician/advocacy community for the SPD.

The Crisis Intervention Program consists of three distinct levels of expertise: all line patrol officers who will receive basic training on crisis intervention; the “certified” Crisis Intervention officers; and the follow-up Crisis Response Team. To become a CIT “certified” officer, those officers must take a 40 hour crisis intervention course with a certification exam and complete additional annual training. A CIT-certified officer will be dispatched to every scene where the police communications center suspects a behavioral crisis and, for the first time, will take primary responsibility at the scene of crisis events. The Crisis Response Team is tasked with following up on officer encounters with those enduring a crisis to assess that appropriate services are in place.

“The new Crisis Intervention Policy gives my officers clear guidelines and resources when they encounter people who are experiencing behavioral crisis,” said Interim Seattle Police Chief Harry Bailey. “This policy also provides access and resources to a vulnerable population. As police officers we are also charged with community care taking duties and this new policy works in concert with that philosophy and will provide officers with the necessary training and tools to help people that are in need of those services. I want to thank the Crisis Intervention Committee for helping us reach another milestone in the DOJ settlement agreement.”

Also, for the first time, officers will be required to collect data on every encounter they have with individuals in behavioral crisis, again to systematically track and assess the deployment and effectiveness of resources.

The Justice Department’s investigation in 2011 found that SPD’s patterns of excessive force often arose from encounters with persons with mental illnesses or those under the influence of alcohol or drugs. This finding was particularly troubling because, by its own estimates, 70% of SPD’s use of force during that time period involved these populations.

Press inquiries regarding the DOJ/SPD consent decree should be directed to Colleen Bernier at (206) 553-7970 or Colleen.Bernier@usdoj.gov. Ms. Bernier will determine the appropriate person to respond.

– Read FULL REPORT

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Chokeholds: King County Sheriff John Urquhart

King County Courthouse
516 Third Ave
Room W-150
Seattle, WA 98104
(206) 296-4155
sheriff@kingcounty.gov

Attention: King County Sheriff John Urquhart

With the disturbing and unsettling recent announcement on August 4 by the Seattle Times article entitled “King County deputies restart neck-restraint training” and a report from KOMO TV 4: King Co. Sheriff’s deputies now allowed to use ‘chokeholds.

This letter is in regards to your department’s announcing continued training in the use of what is basically known as a “chokehold”.

A recent case in Staten Island New York on July 17 where a nypd officer’s use of the chokehold resulted in the death of Eric Garner could in fact, and will in fact happen here. The chokehold, ruled by a county coroner as the direct cause of death with Mr. Garner has been prohibited by New York City Police Department policy since 1993. And in the past there have been countless other deaths resulting from this apprehension technique.

If your department’s choke hold training is in fact implemented, its a matter of time before it results in fatalities. King County, the City of Seattle, nor the State of Washington are prepared to deal with the class-action lawsuits, or any other action directed straight at the king county sheriffs department, including civil unrest and any inflamed notoriety directed at this city or state.

While new ‘use of force’ decisions have to be made, whats even more important is that the ‘right’ decision is made, and not one that will result in future fatalities at the hands of king county deputies.

Ron Williams / Executive Director
Government Policies Enforcement / LEATF
Law Enforcement Accountability Task Force
http://www.gpenforcement.wordpress.com