children, health fair, mental health, mental illness, paramedic, pulsepoint, seattle action network, teens, veterans, women of color

Seattle/King County Clinic at KeyArena at Seattle Center October 27-30, 2016

keyarena-main-skc-clinic-2016-886e076af0

The next Seattle/King County Clinic is scheduled for October 27-30, 2016 and has a goal of providing $3.5 million in services to 4,000 patients.

Seattle/King County Clinic brings together healthcare organizations, civic agencies, non-profits, private businesses and volunteers from across the State of Washington to produce a giant free health clinic in KeyArena at Seattle Center.

The four-day volunteer-driven clinic provides a full range of free dental, vision and medical care to underserved and vulnerable populations in the region.

bruce harrell, homeless, mental health, seattle action network, spd

Federal judge approves of new Seattle Police Department Crisis Intervention Policy

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Federal judge approves of new SPD Crisis Intervention Policy
February 12, 2014

Yesterday, U.S. District Judge James L Robart approved a newly developed Crisis Intervention Policy for the Seattle Police Department that is designed to better prepare officers in dealing with mentally ill or drug affected people. The policy becomes official on March 3, 2014 and training will begin shortly thereafter.

The Mayor said of the new policy: “People experiencing a behavioral crisis are victims who deserve of our care and attention, and our SPD officers deserve clear expectations for how to approach and interact with those in this kind of situation. The many lessons learned from the tragic John T. Williams shooting have helped inform the Department’s new crisis intervention policy, which I believe will be of significant help to officers as they face these kinds of encounters in the future.”

A full press release from the Department of Justice about the new policy and it’s federal approval is in full here:

DOJ AND CITY HAIL FEDERAL JUDGE’S APPROVAL OF THE NEW SEATTLE POLICE DEPARTMENT CRISIS INTERVENTION POLICY

Policy Sets New Procedures and Training for Officers Dealing with Mentally Ill or Drug Affected Individuals

U.S. District Judge James L. Robart today approved a new Crisis Intervention Policy for the Seattle Police Department, announced U.S. Attorney Jenny A. Durkan. The policy, developed with local, regional and nationally-recognized experts in the fields of mental health and drug addiction, is designed to improve community safety and provide officers with the guidance and training they need to treat those having a behavioral crisis with dignity and respect, and to resolve crisis incidents by connecting those individuals with community services that can provide long-term stabilizing support. One key component of the policy calls for officers to de-escalate the situation when feasible and reasonable.

The new policy will become the official policy of the Seattle Police Department on March 3, 2014, and initial training to the policy will begin soon thereafter.“SPD’s data shows that far too many situations requiring force involve people suffering from mental health or substance abuse issues. This new policy creates critical new organizational and operational changes for the Seattle Police Department that will guide and help officers when dealing with such individuals,” said U.S. Attorney Jenny A. Durkan. “The phased approach is a model for urban policing. While all officers will be trained, selected officers will be certified with advanced training to manage the scene when dealing with a person in crisis. A crisis response team will follow up on criminal investigations where mental illness is suspected. These organizational and operational changes are recognized as best practices at the best law enforcement agencies in the nation. We thank the members of the Crisis Intervention Committee (and their sponsoring agencies) for the time they generously spent in diligently and carefully helping to craft these policies.”

The new policy was developed over months of work by the Crisis Intervention Committee (CIC), composed of mental and behavioral health experts: providers, clinicians, advocates, academics, outside law enforcement representatives, members of the Seattle Police Department (SPD) and the judiciary. The CIC was created in 2013 to provide a problem-solving forum for interagency issues, including the development of policy, the evaluation of training for SPD’s officers engaged with this population, and the collection of data and other information to track systemic failures in providing the available services.

“People experiencing a behavioral crisis are victims who deserve of our care and attention, and our SPD officers deserve clear expectations for how to approach and interact with those in this kind of situation,” said Seattle Mayor Ed Murray. “The many lessons learned from the tragic John T. Williams shooting have helped inform the Department’s new crisis intervention policy, which I believe will be of significant help to officers as they face these kinds of encounters in the future.”

The policy creates the position of a Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) coordinator, Lt. Marty Rivera, who is appointed by the Chief of Police and provides command-level oversight of the Crisis Intervention Program and, who is the primary point of contact for the mental health provider/clinician/advocacy community for the SPD.

The Crisis Intervention Program consists of three distinct levels of expertise: all line patrol officers who will receive basic training on crisis intervention; the “certified” Crisis Intervention officers; and the follow-up Crisis Response Team. To become a CIT “certified” officer, those officers must take a 40 hour crisis intervention course with a certification exam and complete additional annual training. A CIT-certified officer will be dispatched to every scene where the police communications center suspects a behavioral crisis and, for the first time, will take primary responsibility at the scene of crisis events. The Crisis Response Team is tasked with following up on officer encounters with those enduring a crisis to assess that appropriate services are in place.

“The new Crisis Intervention Policy gives my officers clear guidelines and resources when they encounter people who are experiencing behavioral crisis,” said Interim Seattle Police Chief Harry Bailey. “This policy also provides access and resources to a vulnerable population. As police officers we are also charged with community care taking duties and this new policy works in concert with that philosophy and will provide officers with the necessary training and tools to help people that are in need of those services. I want to thank the Crisis Intervention Committee for helping us reach another milestone in the DOJ settlement agreement.”

Also, for the first time, officers will be required to collect data on every encounter they have with individuals in behavioral crisis, again to systematically track and assess the deployment and effectiveness of resources.

The Justice Department’s investigation in 2011 found that SPD’s patterns of excessive force often arose from encounters with persons with mental illnesses or those under the influence of alcohol or drugs. This finding was particularly troubling because, by its own estimates, 70% of SPD’s use of force during that time period involved these populations.

Press inquiries regarding the DOJ/SPD consent decree should be directed to Colleen Bernier at (206) 553-7970 or Colleen.Bernier@usdoj.gov. Ms. Bernier will determine the appropriate person to respond.

– Read FULL REPORT

employment

How One Homeless Teenage Mother Broke the Cycle of Poverty


Since Superstorm Sandy pounded the East Coast, New Jersey food banks are in high demand, some feeding twice as many families as before, npr.org reports. And as Thanksgiving approaches, some food banks are struggling to bring turkeys to their families’ tables.

The Food Bank of Monmouth and Ocean County has distributed over 250,000 meals in the last two weeks alone, executive director Carlos Rodriguez told nj.com.

FULL STORY

day labor, employment, job, jobs, personal income, Work, workplace

The ‘Seattle Action Network’

When “Occupy SEATTLE” was given ‘orders’ to vacate the property at Seattle Central Community College recently, we also provide the help with the cleanup!!!!

(NOTE: To help you temporarily until we are setup, on the right side menu under the heading ‘Blogroll’ please click on ‘part time work’, or search ‘craigslist jobs’)

First of all I would like to thank all the good citizens of Seattle and eslewhere, who have bought our candy, soda, and water as a way of our raising funds for the Seattle Action Network Project!

How will The Seattle Action Network help you?

We are currently working to assemble a small staff of people who’s primary priority is to help the homeless find TEMPORARY DAY work. Any work. That is our primary goal, to help the homeless to become more productive in their lives. We will assist them with sending out emails for day jobs, and making phone calls to get those jobs.

We are here to help them be their productive best. We are here to help them secure a better future for themselves and/or their families.


Here is what The Seattle Job Network will offer you within the coming months:
We will have 24 hour access to employers who will hire you, even if part-time.

This website is in a startup stage, so please check back on a daily basis for updates.

Article from 2008 about Seattle’s Homeless: Seattle Battles The Homeless

day labor, employment, job, jobs, personal income, workplace

What is a “Job”?


A job is a regular activity performed in exchange for payment. A person usually begins a job by becoming an employee, volunteering, or starting a business. The duration of a job may range from an hour (in the case of odd jobs) to a lifetime (in the case of some judges). If a person is trained for a certain type of job, they may have a profession. The series of jobs a person holds in their life is their career…


Day Labor

Day laborers find work through three common routes.

First, some employment agencies specialize in very short-term contracts for manual labor most often in construction, factories, offices, and manufacturing. These companies usually have offices where workers can arrive and be assigned to a job on the spot, as they are available.

A manager looking for additional labor to fill an unexpected change in plans is presented with a problem of finding the needed quantity of labor with the right skills. Imagine the magnitude of the task of looking for workers, on the side of the street or by calling various employment agencies, who can verify they are journeyman asphalt rakers, typist, programmers, etc.

The benefit of representation is applied to both the labor and employer. Labor is given a source of recourse to achieve a safe work environment free of favoritism and arbitrary work assignments. Employers benefit from organized labor training programs, benefit plans, dispute resolution and a labor supply meeting most employers labor demand at most any time or place. The benefit of a labor supply arriving at a specified time and location within less than a days notice is reduced overhead resources.

Source: http://www.wikipidia.com

day labor, employment, job, jobs, personal income, workplace

More than 49 million Americans — even more than thought — live in poverty, new measure finds


In September, the government reported that a record 46.6 million Americans were living in poverty. But a new report released Monday by the Census Bureau using a more sophisticated method to measure poverty rates has found that the true figure is even higher: 49.1 million, or 16 percent of all Americans…

Source: http://www.yahoo.com