internment camps, racism, seattle japanese, seattle public library

LESSONS FROM WORLD WAR II: ENDURING LEGACIES OF JAPANESE AMERICAN INCARCERATION

LESSONS FROM WORLD WAR II: ENDURING LEGACIES OF JAPANESE AMERICAN INCARCERATION Sunday, October 23, 2016, 12:30 – 1:30 p.m.

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Event type Author Readings/Lectures
Where Central Library
Room Location Level 1 – Microsoft Auditorium
Audience Adults
Language English

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Summary A panel of scholars in Japanese American history discusses racial profiling during World War II and current racialized politics. Presented in partnership with Densho.

Description It’s been nearly 75 years since 120,000 people of Japanese heritage were imprisoned as a result of racist wartime hysteria. It took decades for the U.S. Government to acknowledge their wrongdoing and Americans are still coming to terms with this black mark on our nation’s history. In this panel, three leading scholars of Japanese American history will discuss the circumstances that lead to incarceration and its bearing on current events, including racial profiling of American Muslims and the racialized politics on display in the current election cycle.

Panelists:

Karen M. Inouye is the author of “The Long Afterlife of Nikkei Wartime Incarceration” (Stanford University Press, October 2016). She is Assistant Professor of American Studies at Indiana University, Bloomington.

Greg Robinson is professor of history at Université du Québec À Montréal. He is the author of “The Great Unknown: Japanese American Sketches” (University Press of Colorado, September 2016) as well as author and editor of several notable books on Japanese Americans, including “A Tragedy of Democracy,” which was awarded the history book prize of the Association for Asian American Studies; “After Camp,” winner of the Caroline Bancroft History Prize in Western US History, and “By Order of the President.”

Lon Kurashige is the author of “Two Faces of Exclusion: The Untold History of Anti-Asian Racism in the United States” (University of North Carolina Press, September 2016). He is associate professor of history at the University of Southern California.

The panel will be moderated by Brian Niiya, Densho Content Director, who edits the Densho Encyclopedia and is the author of the “Encyclopedia of Japanese American History.”

Densho’s mission is to preserve the testimonies of Japanese Americans who were unjustly incarcerated during World War II before their memories are extinguished. They offer these irreplaceable firsthand accounts, coupled with historical images and teacher resources, to explore principles of democracy and promote equal justice for all. Densho is a Japanese term meaning “to pass on to the next generation,” or to leave a legacy.

Notes Library events and programs are free and everyone is welcome. Registration is not required. Parking is available in the Central Library garage for the weekend rate of $7.

This event is supported by The Seattle Public Library Foundation, author series sponsor Gary Kunis, and media sponsor The Seattle Times and presented in partnership with Densho. Books will be available for purchase from Elliott Bay Book Co. at the event.

Recorded for Podcast This event will be recorded for future podcast.

Contact Info *Central Library 206-386-4636 or Ask a Librarian
Room Capacity Space is limited at library events. Please come early to make sure you get a seat. Due to the fire code, we can’t exceed the maximum capacity for our rooms.

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peace

Nelson Mandela International Day

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From: The United Nations

We stand here today to salute the United Nations Organization and its Member States, both singly and collectively, for joining forces with the masses of our people in a common struggle that has brought about our emancipation and pushed back the frontiers of racism.

South African President Nelson Mandela
Address to UN General Assembly
3 October 1994

The United Nations:
Partner in the Struggle against Apartheid

The elimination of South Africa’s system of legalized racial discrimination known as apartheid (“apart-ness” in the Afrikaans language of the descendants of the first Dutch settlers) was on the agenda of the United Nations from its inception. On 22 June 1946 the Indian government requested that the discriminatory treatment of Indians in the Union of South Africa be included on the agenda of the very first session of the General Assembly.

In the decades that followed the world body would contribute to the global struggle against apartheid by drawing world attention to the inhumanity of the system, legitimizing popular resistance, promoting anti-apartheid actions by governmental and non-governmental organizations, instituting an arms embargo, and supporting an oil embargo and boycotts of apartheid in many fields.

Key dates in the UN campaign against apartheid:

2 December 1950 — The General Assembly declared that “a policy of ‘racial segregation’ (apartheid) is necessarily based on doctrines of racial discrimination”. (Resolution 395(V))

1 April 1960 — The Security Council, in its first action on South Africa, adopted Resolution 134 deploring the policies and actions of the South African government in the wake of the killing of 69 peaceful African protesters in Sharpeville by the police on 21 March. The Council called upon the government to abandon its policies of apartheid and racial discrimination.

2 April 1963 — First meeting of the Special Committee on the Policies of Apartheid of the Government of the Republic of South Africa, It was later renamed the “Special Committee against Apartheid”.

7 August 1963 — The Security Council adopted Resolution 181 calling upon all States to cease the sale and shipment of arms, ammunition and military vehicles to South Africa. The arms embargo was made mandatory on 4 November 1977.

13 November 1963 — The General Assembly, in Resolution 1899 (XVIII) on the question of Namibia, urged all States to refrain from supplying petroleum to South Africa. It was the first of many efforts by the UN to enact effective oil sanctions against apartheid.

23 August-4 September 1966 — International Seminar on Apartheid, Brasilia, organised by the UN Division of Human Rights, the Special Committee against Apartheid and the government of Brazil – the first of scores of conferences and seminars on apartheid organised or co-sponsored by the United Nations.

2 December 1968 — The General Assembly requested all States and organisations “to suspend cultural, educational, sporting and other exchanges with the racist regime and with organisations or institutions in South Africa which practice apartheid.

30 November 1973 — International Convention on the Suppression and Punishment of the Crime of Apartheid approved by the General Assembly (Resolution 3068(XXVIII)). The convention came into force on 18 July 1976.

1 January 1976 — The UN Centre Against Apartheid was established.

17 August 1984 — In Resolution 554 the Security Council declared null and void the new racist constitution of South Africa.

16-20 June 1986 — World Conference on Sanctions against Racist South Africa, organised by the United Nations in cooperation with the OAU and the Movement of Non-aligned Countries

14 December 1989 — The General Assembly adopted by consensus the “Declaration on Apartheid and its Destructive Consequences in Southern Africa,” calling for negotiations to end apartheid and establish a non-racial democracy (Resolution A/RES/S-16/1).

22 June 1990 — Nelson Mandela addressed the Special Committee against Apartheid in New York — his first appearance before the Organisation.

30 July 1992 — With political violence escalating and negotiations at risk, Nelson Mandela requested the United Nations to send observers to South Africa. On the following day the Secretary-General announced that he would send a small group of UN monitors. The United Nations Observer Mission in South Africa was established by the Security Council on 17 August 1992.

8 October 1993 — The General Assembly requested States to restore economic relations with South Africa immediately, and terminate the oil embargo when the Transitional Executive Council in South Africa became operational (Resolution 48/1).

10 May 1994 — South Africa’s first democratically elected non-racial government took office following the general elections of 26-29 April.

23 June 1994 — The General Assembly approved the credentials of the South African delegation and removed the item of apartheid from its agenda. The Security Council removed the question of South Africa from its agenda on 27 June.

3 October 1994 — The first democratically elected president of South Africa, Nelson Mandela, addresses the General Assembly.

With contribution from Enuga S. Reddy, Former UN Assistant Secretary-General, Principal Secretary, UN Special Committee Against Apartheid and Director, UN Centre Against Apartheid