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HUD: Youth Homelessness Demonstration Program (YHDP) Deadline Reminder

Round 3 Youth Homelessness Demonstration Program (YHDP) Deadline Reminder

There are only 2 days remaining until the application submission deadline for the Round 3 Youth Homelessness Demonstration Program (YHDP) Notice of Funding Availability (NOFA) is due. All applications must be submitted by Wednesday, May 15, 2019 at 11:59:59 PM EDT.

Applications shall be submitted to Grants.gov unless a waiver has been issued allowing you to submit your application in paper form. Instructions for submitting your paper application will be contained in the waiver of electronic submission. As a reminder, “Received by Grants.gov” means the applicant received a confirmation of receipt and an application tracking number from Grants.gov. Then Grants.gov assigns an application tracking number and date-and time-stamps each application upon successful receipt by the Grants.gov system. A submission attempt not resulting in confirmation of receipt and an application tracking number is not considered received by Grants.gov. For more information, please see Section IV.D. of the Round 3 YHDP NOFA.

HUD strongly recommends applications be submitted as soon as possible and during regular business hours to allow enough time to correct errors or overcome other problems.

If you have questions pertaining to Round 3 YHDP NOFA, please submit your questions to the Ask A Question (AAQ) portal on the HUD Exchange website and select “CoC” from the “My question is related to” drop down list on Step 2 of the question submission process.

The AAQ portal accepts question submissions 24/7. However, responses are usually provided between 8:00 AM and 5:00 PM Eastern Time, Monday through Friday, except for weekends and federal holidays. Additionally, starting 2 days prior to the application deadline, the AAQ will respond only to emergency technical support questions. To ensure you receive a response to your question, please submit your question via the AAQ no later than 12:00 PM EDT on May 13, 2019. If you have questions related to grants.gov please visit Grants.gov Support for assistance.

Mike O'Brien, seattle city council

Councilmember Mike O’Brien: Road to Housing

Road to Housing

Road to HousingThe Road to Housing program (R2H) began in Seattle as the Safe Parking Pilot Program in 2012 under the leadership of City Councilmember Mike O’Brien. Over the last two and a half years, the pilot has demonstrated an effective public-private partnership between the City and faith-based organizations for helping people living in their vehicles get back into housing. In this partnership, faith-based organizations provide safe places to park, access to a bathroom for participants in the program, and other supports that vary by site such as a regular community meal, microwave, clothing drives, and opportunities to connect with the congregational community. Compass Housing Alliance provides case management, support, and outreach to vehicular residents and potential host organizations.

Goals
The two primary goals of the Road to Housing program areto assist homeless people living in their vehicles to get back into housing as soon as possible, and to reduce neighborhood tensions in communities where vehicular residents tend to congregate

In Seattle and King County, people in their vehicles make up about one-third of the unsheltered population. Faith-based organizations in other parts of the region have already started hosting vehicular residents on their own, so there are opportunities to work with suburban cities and the County on a region-wide approach.

Outcomes
In 2013, the Road to Housing program served 52 vehicular residents, helping 34 households move into a more stable living environment, such as motel vouchers, and transitional or permanent housing. So far in 2014 (January – June), the Road to Housing program has worked with 91 households through case management services, and outreach services has contacted 173 unique households. Program staff work to build relationships with vehicular residents around Seattle, and provide assistance and support for needs identified by individual clients.

Challenges
In 2014, the Seattle City Council added additional funding to expand the Road to Housing program from a pilot to a citywide program, but more needs to be done to serve this growing population. Expanding the program means we need more program parking spaces, more host organizations and a faster placement into improved housing options for participants in the program. Expansion also means we will be working with other cities around King County, to provide similar supports to vehicular residents in those communities.

Opportunities to help
There are many ways you can help support this program, and the biggest way is to talk to your congregation about becoming a host site for Road to Housing participants. Program sites usually host between 3-5 vehicles at a time, which can be cars and/or RVs. Currently, there is a high need for safe places to park RVs, with few options available. Your faith-based organization is in a unique position to participate as a R2H program host site, helping individuals & families who are currently living in a vehicle to access a safe place to park, supportive services, and work to transition out of homelessness and into stable housing

Worried about cost?
There is funding available through the City of Seattle to help faith-based organizations make capital improvements to become a program host site.

For more information
If you are interested in learning more about Seattle’s Road to Housing program or learning more about becoming a program host site, contact Wayne Wilson with Compass Housing Alliance, at wwilson@compasshousingalliance.org.

If you are currently living in your vehicle and are interested in accessing the program, please call the Road to Housing program intake line at (206) 474-1650.

Visit Councilmember Mike O’Brien website

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Councilmember Bagshaw on Opiate Addiction Taskforce Findings

Councilmember Sally Bagshaw (District 7, Pioneer Square to Magnolia) issued the following statement following the release of the Opiate Addiction Task Force’s recommendations:

“Opiate addiction is a terrible reality, and it’s a problem that we have seen across the nation. Addiction clearly exacerbates the struggle for those seeking to overcome homelessness, which is why I’m so heartened to receive the Opiate Addiction Task Force’s findings. My goal as a Seattle/King County Board of Public Health member is to implement proven best practices in Seattle to reverse this opioid crisis and provide tested options for people.

“I’m particularly drawn to the Task Force’s recommendation that we enhance access to buprenorphine, which is an effective tool to treat opioid addiction. As Council considers next year’s annual City budget, I intend to identify funding for a Belltown facility that will provide professional buprenorphine access for those looking to conquer or suppress their addictions.

“I witnessed firsthand the success of a similar buprenorphine program on my study mission to San Francisco this past May. With clinical help and a physician’s counseling, buprenorphine can be obtained through pharmacies or health clinics across San Francisco. When addicts are ready to seek treatment, they should not be put on a wait list—they need treatment right away. That’s why we need ‘treatment on demand’ to dramatically reduce the number of people addicted to heroin. Bupe is one of the alternatives that works.

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