Domestic Violence, Domestic Violence Prevention, NATIONAL DOMESTIC VIOLENCE AWARENESS MONTH, spouse abuse

October is: National Domestic Violence Awareness Month


NATIONAL DOMESTIC VIOLENCE AWARENESS MONTH

National Domestic Violence Awareness Month is an annual designation observed in October. For many, home is a place of love, warmth, and comfort. It’s somewhere that you know you will be surrounded by care and support, and a nice little break from the busyness of the real world. But for millions of others, home is anything but a sanctuary. The U.S. Department of Justice estimates that 1.3 million women and 835,000 men are victims of physical violence by a partner every year.

Every 9 seconds, a woman in the U.S. is beaten or assaulted by a current or ex-significant other.

1 in 4 men are victims of some form of physical violence by an intimate partner.

Federal Way police dedicated to breaking the cycle of domestic violence

By Andy Hwang

Federal Way Chief of Police

Domestic violence is a serious crime that affects people of all incomes, races, ages, and gender. This social problem exists in every community and Federal Way is no exception.

In our city, police officers respond to over 2,700 domestic violence calls each year and it is consistently in our top five calls-for-service each month – about seven calls-per-day. Even with the significant number of calls responded to by police, 70% of domestic violence that occurs goes unreported.

Read more Here

HOW TO OBSERVE

Use #DomesticViolenceAwareness to post on social media. Sometimes, people don’t know if they are really in an abusive relationship because they’re used to their partner calling them crazy or making them feel like all the problems are their own fault. Here are a few ways to know if you’re in an abusive relationship that you need to get out of.

Your partner has hit you, beat you, or strangled you in the past.

Your partner is possessive. They check up on you constantly wondering where you are; they get mad at you for hanging out with certain people if you don’t do what they say.

Your partner is jealous. (A small amount of jealousy is normal and healthy) however, if they accuse you of being unfaithful or isolate you from family or friends, that means the jealousy has gone too far.

Your partner puts you down. They attack your intelligence, looks, mental health, or capabilities. They blame you for all of their violent outbursts and tell you nobody else will want you if you leave.

Your partner threatens you or your family.

Your partner physically and sexually abuses you. If they EVER push, shove, or hit you, or make you have sex with them when you don’t want to, they are abusing you (even if it doesn’t happen all the time.)

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Center for Children & Youth Justice: Uniting partners to redirect gang-involved youth

Learn About: Center for Children & Youth Justice

Youth Leadership, Intervention & Change (LINC) program

What Their Doing:

LINC 2018 Community Assessment Update: Presentation | Full Document

Strengthening agency coordination to reduce youth gang involvement. CCYJ has brought together schools, law enforcement, policymakers, social service providers, and other organizations to collect uniform data and develop an innovative, coordinated approach to address gang/group-involvement countywide.

Connecting gang/group-involved youth and young adults to needed support. Through a coordinated team of providers, LINC is intervening with these young people and reengaging them in secondary education, connecting them to counselling and treatment services,
employment opportunities, and other services they need to succeed. The multidisciplinary team model helps youth and young adults set and reach their educational, employment, and pro-social goals. CCYJ currently facilitates three multidisciplinary teams serving seven King County school districts. In 2017, we expanded into Seattle ensuring LINC is available as a resource throughout King County.

LINC Team Intervention Manual

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Seattle Police Department: Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion (LEAD)

Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion (LEAD) is a pre-booking diversion pilot program developed with the community to address low-level drug and prostitution crimes in the Belltown neighborhood in Seattle and the Skyway area of unincorporated King County. The program allows law enforcement officers to redirect low-level offenders engaged in drug or prostitution activity to community-based services, instead of jail and prosecution. By diverting eligible individuals to services, LEAD is committed to improving public safety and public order, and reducing the criminal behavior of people who participate in the program.

About LEAD
Frequently Asked Questions
LEAD Policy Coordinating Group

Funders
Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion (LEAD) is a new innovative pilot program that was developed with the community to address low-level drug and prostitution crimes in the Belltown neighborhood in Seattle and the Skyway area of unincorporated King County. LEAD will divert low-level drug and prostitution offenders into community-based treatment and support services – including housing, healthcare, job training, treatment and mental health support — instead of processing them through traditional criminal justice system avenues.

A unique coalition of law enforcement agencies, public officials, and community groups collaborated to create this pilot program. These groups make up LEAD’s Policy Coordinating Group, which governs the program.

LEAD’s goal is to improve public safety and public order, and to reduce the criminal behavior of people who participate in the program. The program will be thoroughly evaluated to determine whether it has been successful or not.

Frequently Asked Questions

Below are frequently asked questions about LEAD. If you have further questions about the program, please contact us.

What is LEAD?

LEAD is a pre-booking diversion program that allows officers to redirect low-level offenders engaged in drugs or prostitution activity to community-based services instead of jail and prosecution. LEAD participants begin working immediately with case managers to access services. LEAD’s goals are to reduce the harm a drug offender causes him or herself, as well as the harm that the individual is causing the surrounding community. This public safety program has the potential to reduce recidivism rates for low-level offenders and preserve expensive criminal justice system resources for more serious or violent offenders.

How does LEAD differ from other drug programs?

First, LEAD is the result of a commitment from law enforcement agencies, public officials, and community organizations to work together in implementing a new approach to addressing drug and prostitution activity. Second, the diversion in LEAD is made at the pre-booking stage, in the hopes of bypassing the costs and time entailed in booking, charging, and requiring court appearances of an individual. Finally, LEAD provides participants with immediate case management services, and access to additional resources not available through existing public programs.

Who is eligible for diversion into LEAD?

Individuals who are arrested for eligible offenses within specified boundaries for Belltown or Skyway may be diverted into LEAD. Eligible offenses include low-level drug offenses, and engaging in prostitution. Individuals who have certain violent offenses in their criminal history are ineligible for diversion.

Who designed LEAD?

LEAD is the result of an unusual collaboration among diverse stakeholders. Collaborators include the King County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office, the Seattle City Attorney’s Office, the Seattle Police Department, the King County Sheriff’s Office, the King County Executive, the Mayor’s Office, The Washington State Department of Corrections, The Defender Association, the ACLU of Washington, and community members. The collaboration of these stakeholders was motivated by a shared dissatisfaction with the outcomes and costs of traditional drug law enforcement.

Who runs LEAD?

As noted, LEAD is the result of a collaboration among a number of stakeholders. All stakeholders are represented on LEAD’s Policy Coordinating Group, and the group makes decisions by consensus via a memorandum of understanding. LEAD is entirely voluntary, and any stakeholder may choose to withdraw from LEAD at any time.

Who will provide services to LEAD participants?

LEAD stakeholders have contracted with Evergreen Treatment Services (ETS) to provide services to LEAD participants. ETS has provided addiction treatment services in Washington for over 30 years, and has been actively involved in federally-funded research projects. ETS’ REACH Program has been a key provider in the delivery of street outreach services to chronically homeless and chemically addicted adults in Seattle for 15 years. ETS will follow harm reduction principles and will attempt to provide immediate access to services.

How will we know if LEAD works?

All LEAD stakeholders are committed to evaluating the program rigorously. The evaluation will consider, among other factors, whether LEAD has resulted in reductions in drug use and recidivism, whether LEAD is more cost-effective than traditional criminal justice processing, and whether LEAD has had a positive impact on a community’s quality of life.

How much will LEAD cost the City of Seattle and King County?

Nothing. LEAD stakeholders obtained funding from private foundations to implement the program. Its funders include the Ford Foundation, Open Society Foundations, Vital Projects Fund, RiverStyx Foundation, Massena Foundation, and the Social Justice Fund Northwest.

Do community members support LEAD?

Community members strongly support LEAD. LEAD will be piloted first in Belltown, and then in Skyway (in partnership with the King County Sheriff’s Office). Members of both communities have participated in the program’s design, and will continue to provide feedback about the program. For example, the LEAD Community Advisory Board in Belltown includes representatives from the Belltown Community Council, Belltown Business Association, Downtown Seattle Association/Metropolitan Improvement District, Recovery Café, YWCA, Plymouth Housing Group, and Millionair Club Charity. The LEAD Community Advisory Board in Skyway includes representatives from Skyway United Methodist Church, Westhill Community Council, and Skyway Solutions.

For how long will LEAD be implemented?

LEAD formally began on October 1, 2011. The program is anticipated to run for two years before an evaluation is begun, and to continue with foundation funding for an additional two years while the evaluation is conducted and analyzed. If LEAD is found to be effective, an ongoing source of funding will be sought.

Have programs like LEAD been implemented elsewhere?

LEAD was inspired by “arrest-referral” programs in the United Kingdom. Those programs have recently been implemented in virtually every police department in the United Kingdom because pilot projects proved to be so effective.

Policy Coordinating Group
LEAD is governed by a Policy Coordinating Group. The group makes decisions by consensus via a memorandum of understanding. LEAD is entirely voluntary, and any stakeholder may choose to withdraw from LEAD at any time. The members include:

Seattle Office of the Mayor
King County Executive Office
Seattle City Council
King County Council
Seattle City Attorney’s Office
King County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office
Seattle Police Department
King County Sheriff’s Office
Washington Department of Corrections
Belltown LEAD Community Advisory Board
Skyway LEAD Community Advisory Board
The Defender Association, Racial Disparity Project
ACLU of Washington, Drug Policy Project

Funders
LEAD is currently operating as a pilot program and is being funded by private foundations. It is hoped that LEAD will eventually find permanent funding from public sources. The cost-effectiveness of the program will be studied in detail as part of the evaluation for LEAD.

Current funders include:

Ford Foundation
Open Society Foundations
Vital Projects Fund
RiverStyx Foundation
Massena Foundation
The Social Justice Fund Northwest

Read more about LEAD

drug overdose, opioid

Walgreens: The opioid epidemic in our nation. #It Ends with Us.

The opioid epidemic in our nation has reached a critical point.

Every day thousands of teenagers and young adults find themselves spiraling down a path of addiction. Opioids are legal pain relievers that are typically prescribed for teens and young adults after major injuries and surgeries. Due to the addictive nature of these drugs — many young adults find themselves switching to illegal usage of heroin when their prescriptions run out, as it is less expensive and easier to access. Walgreens, together with teen community leaders, is committed to ending the epidemic through education and preventative measures. Let’s be part of the generation that ends this horrific epidemic of opioid addiction.

#ItEndsWithUs

Read more It Ends with Us at Walgreens

black lives matter, black youth, education

WA State Black Prisoners Caucus Annual Youth Summit 2018

BPC 2018 Annual Youth Summit

January 14, 2018 |

Black Prisoners’ Caucus – Shelton is holding their annual Youth Summit. This summit is organized and facilitated by the BPC – Shelton Youth Committee. This summit is for educators, administrators, service providers and community members working with youth/young adults that want to learn and become a partner in this work. All guests must be pre-approved through a security screening process.

If you are interested in attending please send your Full Name, Date of Birth, Place of Birth, and Last 4 Digits of your social security number to bpcsummit@gmail.com by January 31st.

Please also include a phone number, email address and if you would like

Visit the Black Prisoners Caucus website
Read More

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2017 Seattle Youth Employment Program (SYEP).

YOUTH EMPLOYMENT
Read more APPLICATION HERE

The Seattle Youth Employment Program (SYEP), in support of the Mayor’s Youth Employment Initiative, provides internship opportunities aimed at meeting the employment needs of underserved youth and young adults in our community. By promoting work readiness and strengthening career development, SYEP helps to prepare and support youth for real world jobs by providing them with the skills necessary to be competitive in the job market.

SYEP Internships
Read more APPLICATION HERE

Internships start July 5, 2017 and end August 15, 2017.

Enrollment
Applications open March 13, 2017 and close April 14, 2017.

Internships will be offered on a first-come, first-serve basis.

Eligibility
City of Seattle Resident
Ages 16 to 24

Demonstrated ability to be responsible, determined and committed
Meet HUD Income Guidelines

group of happy college students looking back

Read more APPLICATION HERE

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Catholic Community Services Emergency Assistance Program

The Emergency Assistance program helps families, single adults, seniors, and people with disabilities with a variety of emergency and basic needs. Services include:

Rental Assistance and Eviction Prevention
Move-in Assistance
Utility Assistance and Shut-off Prevention
Information & Resource Referral
Short-term Case Management
Emergency Motel Vouchers (families with children under 18 only)
Food Bags and Cards (based on availability)
Bus Tickets (based on availability)
To access services please call the intake line for your geographic area for updated
information and eligibility.

Seattle and South King County:

Seattle and South King County
(253) 850-2523

East King County
(425) 213-1963 x2

Volunteer

1-888-649-6850

Visit the WEBSITE

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Youth Opportunity Summit

Youth Opportunity Summit

jobs_Sept10

March 16, 2015 by Office of Mayor Murray

opportunity-summit1-300x176

Youth Opportunity Summit Mayor Murray is convening an all-day Youth Opportunity Summit, with a particular focus on improving outcomes for young men of color. This Summit is intended to launch a new conversation about how we can build on the good work of our community partners through better alignment of resources, better coordination across systems and agencies, and through lifting up the voices of young people to address longstanding disparities.

Youth Opportunity Summit

When: Saturday, April 11th, 2015, 8:30 AM – 4:30 PM

Where: Rainier Beach High School, 8815 S Seward Park Ave, Seattle, WA 98118

Seattle has committed to three related national initiatives:

President Obama’s My Brother’s Keeper, a community challenge to improve outcomes for young men of color;
Cities United, an effort by the National League of Cities to reduce black male homicide;
National Forum on Youth Violence Prevention, an initiative of the federal Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention that seeks to more effectively prevent youth and gang violence.

The Youth Opportunity Summit will also serve as a space for dialogue on how Seattle can connect to a larger national network of communities engaged in addressing disparities for young people of color, identify ways to improve on our local strategies, and ultimately take action to move the needle locally.

Read more FULL REPORT

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Chokeholds: King County Sheriff John Urquhart

King County Courthouse
516 Third Ave
Room W-150
Seattle, WA 98104
(206) 296-4155
sheriff@kingcounty.gov

Attention: King County Sheriff John Urquhart

With the disturbing and unsettling recent announcement on August 4 by the Seattle Times article entitled “King County deputies restart neck-restraint training” and a report from KOMO TV 4: King Co. Sheriff’s deputies now allowed to use ‘chokeholds.

This letter is in regards to your department’s announcing continued training in the use of what is basically known as a “chokehold”.

A recent case in Staten Island New York on July 17 where a nypd officer’s use of the chokehold resulted in the death of Eric Garner could in fact, and will in fact happen here. The chokehold, ruled by a county coroner as the direct cause of death with Mr. Garner has been prohibited by New York City Police Department policy since 1993. And in the past there have been countless other deaths resulting from this apprehension technique.

If your department’s choke hold training is in fact implemented, its a matter of time before it results in fatalities. King County, the City of Seattle, nor the State of Washington are prepared to deal with the class-action lawsuits, or any other action directed straight at the king county sheriffs department, including civil unrest and any inflamed notoriety directed at this city or state.

While new ‘use of force’ decisions have to be made, whats even more important is that the ‘right’ decision is made, and not one that will result in future fatalities at the hands of king county deputies.

Ron Williams / Executive Director
Government Policies Enforcement / LEATF
Law Enforcement Accountability Task Force
http://www.gpenforcement.wordpress.com

seattle action network, spd

Judge denies citizen commission formal role in SPD reforms

Judge denies citizen commission formal role in SPD reforms
Posted by Steve Miletich

A federal judge today denied a citizen commission’s request to formally intervene in court-ordered Seattle police reforms and refused to grant delays the panel had requested to offer its views regarding policy changes.

But in a 19-page order, U.S. District Judge James Robart permitted the Community Police Commission (CPC) to file memorandums with the court “commenting on any issue or motion” raised as part of the City of Seattle’s settlement agreement with the Department of Justice to curb excessive force and biased policing in the Police Department.

Robart also granted “compromise” delays offered by federal attorneys to allow the CPC, which was created as part of last year’s settlement agreement, more time to comment on bias-free policing, brief detentions of citizens and the Police Department’s community outreach.

However, Robart denied the CPC’s request to extend deadlines to comment on use-of-force training curricula, an early-intervention system to identify problem officers and policy manual for the Police Department’s internal-investigation unit, the Office of Professional Accountability.

Robart’s ruling represented a victory for federal attorneys, who objected to the CPC’s request to intervene, saying it would cause undue delay in the reform. They also fully objected to some of the delays sought by the CPC.

In his ruling, Robart wrote that “permitting intervention would likely result in undue delay without a corresponding benefit to existing litigants, the court, or the process of reform because the existing parties are zealously pursing the same ultimate objectives as the CPC.”

Robart wrote that the CPC’s attempt to expand its role beyond that described in the settlement agreement “threatens to slow the process of reform and full implementation” of the agreement.

The 15-member CPC already has been granted a “defined and robust” role in the reform process, Robart wrote, noting that its ultimate objective ­­– “ constitutional and effective policing” — is shared by the Department of Justice.

In allowing the CPC to file memorandums, Robart granted the commission “amicus curiae” status as a friend of the court, an alternative suggested by the CPC in its request to intervene.

The CPC, as part of its motion to intervene, requested delays ranging from 31 to 120 days, which Robart reduced or denied.

Source: The Seattle Times