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Center for Children & Youth Justice: Uniting partners to redirect gang-involved youth

Learn About: Center for Children & Youth Justice

Youth Leadership, Intervention & Change (LINC) program

What Their Doing:

LINC 2018 Community Assessment Update: Presentation | Full Document

Strengthening agency coordination to reduce youth gang involvement. CCYJ has brought together schools, law enforcement, policymakers, social service providers, and other organizations to collect uniform data and develop an innovative, coordinated approach to address gang/group-involvement countywide.

Connecting gang/group-involved youth and young adults to needed support. Through a coordinated team of providers, LINC is intervening with these young people and reengaging them in secondary education, connecting them to counselling and treatment services,
employment opportunities, and other services they need to succeed. The multidisciplinary team model helps youth and young adults set and reach their educational, employment, and pro-social goals. CCYJ currently facilitates three multidisciplinary teams serving seven King County school districts. In 2017, we expanded into Seattle ensuring LINC is available as a resource throughout King County.

LINC Team Intervention Manual

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Seattle Police Department: Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion (LEAD)

Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion (LEAD) is a pre-booking diversion pilot program developed with the community to address low-level drug and prostitution crimes in the Belltown neighborhood in Seattle and the Skyway area of unincorporated King County. The program allows law enforcement officers to redirect low-level offenders engaged in drug or prostitution activity to community-based services, instead of jail and prosecution. By diverting eligible individuals to services, LEAD is committed to improving public safety and public order, and reducing the criminal behavior of people who participate in the program.

About LEAD
Frequently Asked Questions
LEAD Policy Coordinating Group

Funders
Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion (LEAD) is a new innovative pilot program that was developed with the community to address low-level drug and prostitution crimes in the Belltown neighborhood in Seattle and the Skyway area of unincorporated King County. LEAD will divert low-level drug and prostitution offenders into community-based treatment and support services – including housing, healthcare, job training, treatment and mental health support — instead of processing them through traditional criminal justice system avenues.

A unique coalition of law enforcement agencies, public officials, and community groups collaborated to create this pilot program. These groups make up LEAD’s Policy Coordinating Group, which governs the program.

LEAD’s goal is to improve public safety and public order, and to reduce the criminal behavior of people who participate in the program. The program will be thoroughly evaluated to determine whether it has been successful or not.

Frequently Asked Questions

Below are frequently asked questions about LEAD. If you have further questions about the program, please contact us.

What is LEAD?

LEAD is a pre-booking diversion program that allows officers to redirect low-level offenders engaged in drugs or prostitution activity to community-based services instead of jail and prosecution. LEAD participants begin working immediately with case managers to access services. LEAD’s goals are to reduce the harm a drug offender causes him or herself, as well as the harm that the individual is causing the surrounding community. This public safety program has the potential to reduce recidivism rates for low-level offenders and preserve expensive criminal justice system resources for more serious or violent offenders.

How does LEAD differ from other drug programs?

First, LEAD is the result of a commitment from law enforcement agencies, public officials, and community organizations to work together in implementing a new approach to addressing drug and prostitution activity. Second, the diversion in LEAD is made at the pre-booking stage, in the hopes of bypassing the costs and time entailed in booking, charging, and requiring court appearances of an individual. Finally, LEAD provides participants with immediate case management services, and access to additional resources not available through existing public programs.

Who is eligible for diversion into LEAD?

Individuals who are arrested for eligible offenses within specified boundaries for Belltown or Skyway may be diverted into LEAD. Eligible offenses include low-level drug offenses, and engaging in prostitution. Individuals who have certain violent offenses in their criminal history are ineligible for diversion.

Who designed LEAD?

LEAD is the result of an unusual collaboration among diverse stakeholders. Collaborators include the King County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office, the Seattle City Attorney’s Office, the Seattle Police Department, the King County Sheriff’s Office, the King County Executive, the Mayor’s Office, The Washington State Department of Corrections, The Defender Association, the ACLU of Washington, and community members. The collaboration of these stakeholders was motivated by a shared dissatisfaction with the outcomes and costs of traditional drug law enforcement.

Who runs LEAD?

As noted, LEAD is the result of a collaboration among a number of stakeholders. All stakeholders are represented on LEAD’s Policy Coordinating Group, and the group makes decisions by consensus via a memorandum of understanding. LEAD is entirely voluntary, and any stakeholder may choose to withdraw from LEAD at any time.

Who will provide services to LEAD participants?

LEAD stakeholders have contracted with Evergreen Treatment Services (ETS) to provide services to LEAD participants. ETS has provided addiction treatment services in Washington for over 30 years, and has been actively involved in federally-funded research projects. ETS’ REACH Program has been a key provider in the delivery of street outreach services to chronically homeless and chemically addicted adults in Seattle for 15 years. ETS will follow harm reduction principles and will attempt to provide immediate access to services.

How will we know if LEAD works?

All LEAD stakeholders are committed to evaluating the program rigorously. The evaluation will consider, among other factors, whether LEAD has resulted in reductions in drug use and recidivism, whether LEAD is more cost-effective than traditional criminal justice processing, and whether LEAD has had a positive impact on a community’s quality of life.

How much will LEAD cost the City of Seattle and King County?

Nothing. LEAD stakeholders obtained funding from private foundations to implement the program. Its funders include the Ford Foundation, Open Society Foundations, Vital Projects Fund, RiverStyx Foundation, Massena Foundation, and the Social Justice Fund Northwest.

Do community members support LEAD?

Community members strongly support LEAD. LEAD will be piloted first in Belltown, and then in Skyway (in partnership with the King County Sheriff’s Office). Members of both communities have participated in the program’s design, and will continue to provide feedback about the program. For example, the LEAD Community Advisory Board in Belltown includes representatives from the Belltown Community Council, Belltown Business Association, Downtown Seattle Association/Metropolitan Improvement District, Recovery Café, YWCA, Plymouth Housing Group, and Millionair Club Charity. The LEAD Community Advisory Board in Skyway includes representatives from Skyway United Methodist Church, Westhill Community Council, and Skyway Solutions.

For how long will LEAD be implemented?

LEAD formally began on October 1, 2011. The program is anticipated to run for two years before an evaluation is begun, and to continue with foundation funding for an additional two years while the evaluation is conducted and analyzed. If LEAD is found to be effective, an ongoing source of funding will be sought.

Have programs like LEAD been implemented elsewhere?

LEAD was inspired by “arrest-referral” programs in the United Kingdom. Those programs have recently been implemented in virtually every police department in the United Kingdom because pilot projects proved to be so effective.

Policy Coordinating Group
LEAD is governed by a Policy Coordinating Group. The group makes decisions by consensus via a memorandum of understanding. LEAD is entirely voluntary, and any stakeholder may choose to withdraw from LEAD at any time. The members include:

Seattle Office of the Mayor
King County Executive Office
Seattle City Council
King County Council
Seattle City Attorney’s Office
King County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office
Seattle Police Department
King County Sheriff’s Office
Washington Department of Corrections
Belltown LEAD Community Advisory Board
Skyway LEAD Community Advisory Board
The Defender Association, Racial Disparity Project
ACLU of Washington, Drug Policy Project

Funders
LEAD is currently operating as a pilot program and is being funded by private foundations. It is hoped that LEAD will eventually find permanent funding from public sources. The cost-effectiveness of the program will be studied in detail as part of the evaluation for LEAD.

Current funders include:

Ford Foundation
Open Society Foundations
Vital Projects Fund
RiverStyx Foundation
Massena Foundation
The Social Justice Fund Northwest

Read more about LEAD

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President Donald J. Trump’s Initiative to Stop Opioid Abuse and Reduce Drug Supply and Demand

President Donald J. Trump’s Initiative to Stop Opioid Abuse and Reduce Drug Supply and Demand

HEALTHCARE

We will work to strengthen vulnerable families and communities, and we will help to build and grow a stronger, healthier, and drug-free society.

President Donald J. Trump

ADDRESSING THE DRIVING FORCES OF THE OPIOID CRISIS: President Donald J. Trump’s Initiative to Stop Opioids Abuse and Reduce Drug Supply and Demand will confront the driving forces behind the opioid crisis.

President Trump’s Initiative to Stop Opioid Abuse will address factors fueling the opioid crisis, including over-prescription, illicit drug supplies, and insufficient access to evidence-based treatment, primary prevention, and recovery support services.

The President’s Opioid Initiative will:

Reduce drug demand through education, awareness, and preventing over-prescription.
Cut off the flow of illicit drugs across our borders and within communities.

Save lives now by expanding opportunities for proven treatments for opioid and other drug addictions.
REDUCE DEMAND AND OVER-PRESCRIPTION: President Trump’s Opioid Initiative will educate Americans about the dangers of opioid and other drug use and seek to curb over-prescription.

Launch a nationwide evidence-based campaign to raise public awareness about the dangers of prescription and illicit opioid use, as well as other drug use.

Support research and development efforts for innovative technologies and additional therapies designed to prevent addiction and decrease the use of opioids in pain management.

This will include supporting research and development for a vaccine to prevent opioid addiction and non-addictive pain management options.

Reduce the over-prescription of opioids which has the potential to lead Americans down a path to addiction or facilitate diversion to illicit use.

Implement a Safer Prescribing Plan to achieve the following objectives:

Cut nationwide opioid prescription fills by one-third within three years.

Ensure that 75 percent of opioid prescriptions reimbursed by Federal healthcare programs are issued using best practices within three years, and 95 percent within five years.

Ensure that at least half of all Federally-employed healthcare providers adopt best practices for opioid prescribing within two years, with all of them doing so within five years.

Leverage Federal funding opportunities related to opioids to ensure that States transition to a
nationally interoperable Prescription Drug Monitoring Program network.

CUT OFF THE SUPPLY OF ILLICIT DRUGS: President Trump’s Opioid Initiative will crack down on international and domestic illicit drug supply chains devastating American communities:

Keep dangerous drugs out of the United States.

Secure land borders, ports of entry, and water ways against illegal smuggling.
Require advance electronic data for 90 percent of all international mail shipments (with goods) and consignment shipments within three years, in order for the Department of Homeland Security to flag high-risk shipments.

Identify and inspect high-risk shipments leveraging advanced screening technologies and by using drug-detecting canines.

Test and identify suspicious substances in high-risk international packages to quickly detect and remove known and emerging illicit drugs before they can cause harm.
Engage with China and expand cooperation with Mexico to reduce supplies of heroin, other illicit opioids, and precursor chemicals.

Advance the Department of Justice (DOJ) Prescription Interdiction and Litigation (PIL) Task Force to fight the prescription opioid crisis. The PIL Task Force will:

Expand the DOJ Opioid Fraud and Abuse Detection Unit’s efforts to prosecute corrupt or criminally negligent doctors, pharmacies, and distributors.

Aggressively deploy appropriate criminal and civil actions to hold opioid manufacturers accountable for any unlawful practices.

Shut down illicit opioid sales conducted online and seize any related assets.
Scale up internet enforcement efforts under DOJ’s new Joint Criminal Opioid Darknet Enforcement (J-CODE) team.

Strengthen criminal penalties for dealing and trafficking in fentanyl and other opioids:
DOJ will seek the death penalty against drug traffickers, where appropriate under current law.
The President also calls on Congress to pass legislation that reduces the threshold amount of drugs needed to invoke mandatory minimum sentences for drug traffickers who knowingly distribute certain illicit opioids that are lethal in trace amounts.

HELP THOSE STRUGGLING WITH ADDICTION: President Trump’s Opioid Initiative will help those struggling with addiction through evidence-based treatment and recovery support services:

Work to ensure first responders are supplied with naloxone, a lifesaving medication used to reverse overdoses.

Leverage Federal funding opportunities to State and local jurisdictions to incentivize and improve nationwide overdose tracking systems that will help resources to be rapidly deployed to hard-hit areas.
Expand access to evidence-based addiction treatment in every State, particularly Medication-Assisted Treatment for opioid addiction.

Seek legislative changes to the law prohibiting Medicaid from reimbursing residential treatment at certain facilities with more than 16 beds.

In the meantime, continue approving State Medicaid demonstration projects that waive these barriers to inpatient treatment.

Provide on-demand, evidence-based addiction treatment to service members, veterans and their families eligible for healthcare through the Departments of Defense or Veterans Affairs.
Leverage opportunities in the criminal justice system to identify and treat offenders struggling with addiction.

Screen every Federal inmate for opioid addiction at intake.

For those who screen positive and are approved for placement in residential reentry centers, facilitate naltrexone treatment and access to treatment prior to and while at residential reentry centers and facilitate connection to community treatment services as needed.

Scale up support for State, Tribal, and local drug courts in order to provide offenders struggling with addiction access to evidence-based treatment as an alternative to or in conjunction with incarceration, or as a condition of supervised release.

Read more The White House

black lives matter, black youth, education

WA State Black Prisoners Caucus Annual Youth Summit 2018

BPC 2018 Annual Youth Summit

January 14, 2018 |

Black Prisoners’ Caucus – Shelton is holding their annual Youth Summit. This summit is organized and facilitated by the BPC – Shelton Youth Committee. This summit is for educators, administrators, service providers and community members working with youth/young adults that want to learn and become a partner in this work. All guests must be pre-approved through a security screening process.

If you are interested in attending please send your Full Name, Date of Birth, Place of Birth, and Last 4 Digits of your social security number to bpcsummit@gmail.com by January 31st.

Please also include a phone number, email address and if you would like

Visit the Black Prisoners Caucus website
Read More

employment, hiring, internerships, job, job fairs, jobs

Mon May 15, May 16 Lake Washington Hyatt Regency Job Fair

Hyatt Regency Job Fair

YOU can play a part in HYATT hospitality! Hyatt Regency Lake Washington will host two job fairs. Come visit us on Monday, May 15th or Tuesday, May 16th from 8am to 6pm.

The event takes place at the Renton Pavilion Event Center, adjacent to the Piazza and the Renton Transit Center

Positions are posted on line at http://www.hyatt.jobs and search: Renton, WA

Join us at the Renton Pavilion computers available to apply

We are hiring for:

Culinary
Housekeeping
Food and Beverage
Rooms
Engineering
Banquets
Events
Purchasing

We are Equal Opportunity Employer if you have questions please email marci.flores@hyatt.com.

Visit WorkSource website

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BLS REVIEW: EMPLOYMENT AND UNEMPLOYMENT AMONG YOUTH — SUMMER 2016

Employment and Unemployment Among Youth Summary
For release 10:00 a.m. (EDT) Wednesday, August 17, 2016 USDL-16-1687

Technical information: (202) 691-6378 * cpsinfo@bls.gov * http://www.bls.gov/cps
Media contact: (202) 691-5902 * PressOffice@bls.gov

EMPLOYMENT AND UNEMPLOYMENT AMONG YOUTH — SUMMER 2016

From April to July 2016, the number of employed youth 16 to 24 years old increased by
1.9 million to 20.5 million, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. This
year, 53.2 percent of young people were employed in July, little changed from a year
earlier. (The month of July typically is the summertime peak in youth employment.)
Unemployment among youth rose by 611,000 from April to July 2016, compared with an
increase of 654,000 for the same period in 2015. (Because this analysis focuses on the
seasonal changes in youth employment and unemployment that occur each spring and summer,
the data are not seasonally adjusted.)

Labor Force

The youth labor force–16- to 24-year-olds working or actively looking for work–grows
sharply between April and July each year. During these months, large numbers of high
school and college students search for or take summer jobs, and many graduates enter
the labor market to look for or begin permanent employment. This summer, the youth
labor force grew by 2.6 million, or 12.4 percent, to a total of 23.1 million in July.
(See table 1.)

The labor force participation rate for all youth was 60.1 percent in July, little
changed from a year earlier. (The labor force participation rate is the proportion
of the civilian noninstitutional population that is working or looking and available
for work.) (See table 2.) The summer labor force participation rate of youth has held
fairly steady since July 2010, after trending downward for the prior two decades. The
summer youth labor force participation rate peaked at 77.5 percent in July 1989.

The July 2016 labor force participation rate for 16- to 24-year-old men was 62.4
percent, higher than the rate for young women at 57.7 percent. The rates for men and
women were little changed from last July. Whites had the highest youth labor force
participation rate in July 2016 at 62.7 percent. The rate was 53.8 percent for Blacks,
43.1 percent for Asians, and 56.2 percent for Hispanics. The rate for Blacks declined
by 2.6 percentage points from last July, while the rates for Whites, Asians, and
Hispanics showed little or no change.

Employment

In July 2016, there were 20.5 million employed 16- to 24-year-olds, little changed
from the summer before. Between April and July 2016, the number of employed youth
rose by 1.9 million. The employment-population ratio for youth in July 2016–the
proportion of the 16- to 24-year-old civilian noninstitutional population with a
job–was 53.2 percent, little changed from the year before. (See tables 1 and 2.)

The July 2016 employment-population ratios for young men (54.9 percent), women (51.5
percent), Whites (56.5 percent), Blacks (42.7 percent), Asians (38.8 percent), and
Hispanics (49.8 percent) showed little or no change from last July.

In July 2016, the largest percentage of employed youth worked in the leisure and
hospitality industry (25 percent), which includes food services. An additional 18
percent of employed youth worked in the retail trade industry, and 13 percent worked
in education and health services. (See table 3.)

Unemployment

The youth unemployment rate (11.5 percent) and the number of unemployed youth (2.6
million) in July 2016 were little changed from a year earlier. Of those 2.6 million
unemployed 16- to 24-year-olds, 1.9 million were looking for full-time work in July
2016, down 222,000 from July 2015. (See tables 1 and 2.)

The July 2016 unemployment rates for young men (12.0 percent), women (10.8 percent),
Whites (9.9 percent), Blacks (20.6 percent), Asians (10.0 percent), and Hispanics
(11.3 percent) also showed little or no change from last July. (See table 2.)

EMPLOYMENT AND UNEMPLOYMENT AMONG YOUTH — SUMMER 2016

employment

Jobs: Sea-Tac International Airport

Making jobs at Sea-Tac International Airport easier to get and great employees easier to find.

Located in the main terminal of Seattle-Tacoma International Airport, Airport Jobs is the primary recruiting tool for many Seattle-Tacoma International Airport-related employers, and the principal resource for people seeking employment there. Airport Jobs is a program of Port Jobs and is sponsored by the Port of Seattle.

Airport Jobs helps job seekers:

understand what it takes to work at the airport,
learn about current job openings at Sea-Tac Airport,
complete employment applications,
create resumes and cover letters,
learn job search and interviewing techniques, and
obtain referrals to community resources.

For employers, Airport Jobs offers a centralized location to list job openings, start up or expand operations, use our offices for interviewing, and reduce advertising expenditures for job applicants. Let us help you find the right people for the job!

Read more SeaTac Jobs

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SeaTac: Register for Airport University Classes!

Register for Airport University Classes!

Do you work at Sea-Tac Airport? Take college classes at the airport!

Airport University classes start April 3rd! Register today!

We partner with Highline College and South Seattle College to offer classes in Computer Skills, Customer Service, Security, and Workplace Safety. Classes are FREE for income-eligible students.
See flyer for REGISTRATION information and class details.

Read more Classes