addiction, addicts, Carfentanil, Fentanyl

BREAKING: An opioid more deadly than fentanyl found on Seattle streets

SEATTLE (KOMO) — Right in the midst of the opioid crisis, another illicit drug has hit the streets of Seattle. Experts say it’s more potent and deadly than other opiods.

The DEA says carfentanil is 10,000 times more potent than morphine and 100 times stronger than fentanyl. It was first detected in Seattle in March. Experts insists its usage is “very rare” in the area, but nonetheless, it’s surfaced in the city.

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addiction, addicts, aids, black lives matter, black youth, bruce harrell, capitol hill seattle, central district, college students, day labor, drug use, education, employment, gays, hiring, homeless, hunger, internerships, jenny durkan, job, job fair, job fairs, jobs, lesbians, mental health, mental illness, news, nicklesville, opioid, seattle action network, seattle city council, starbucks, summer jobs, summer work, teens, trans, Work, workforce, workplace

Homeless Employment Program (HEP) Tue., May 14, 10 – 11am

Homeless Employment Program (HEP)

The Homeless Employment Program (HEP) is an employment program for folks who are experiencing homelessness. Some of the assistance includes job search, resume help, interview skills, money management, housing search and some supported services.

Tue., May 14, 10 – 11am
WorkSource Affiliate Downtown Seattle
2024 3rd Avenue, Seattle, WA 98121

black lives matter, black youth, bruce harrell, bullying, central district, crime prevention, doj, education, HOMELAND SECURITY, homeless, housing, illegals, immigration, islam, jenny durkan, john t williams, king county sheriffs department, kshama sawant, muslims, Office of Professional Accountability, politics, racism, schools, seattle action network, seattle city council, Seattle Indian Health Board, seattle police department, seattle urban league, south seattle, teens, victims, wmbe, women of color, workplace, youth violence

Seattle Office for Civil Rights at the 2018 RSJI Summit at Seattle Center

Deadline for registration for the summit and all workshops is
Friday, October 19th, 2018

DESCRIPTION

Please join the Seattle Office for Civil Rights at the 2018 RSJI Summit at Seattle Center for two days, October 23rd-24th, of in-depth workshops, art, and presentations about The State of Race and Justice in Seattle.

We will explore the history of RSJI in Seattle City government; offer resources for race and social justice work; discuss race, racism, and the struggle of our communities for racial equity; and acknowledge the historical harm of systemic and institutional racism.

The RSJI Summit will bring together city departments, community artists, educators, youth, organizers, friends, and faily in the spirit of collective organization and healing.

City of Seattle employees:

Please register via Cornerstone https://bit.ly/2OFZNA8

Please register for the following workshops:

Awaken the Lion Day 1 (Yoga, only 15 spots available per session):
Morning Session: Oct. 23rd 8:30 am-9:30 pm
Link to register:https://www.eventbrite.com/e/rsji-summit-2018-internalized-racial-oppression-for-poc-tickets-50888195964?aff=original

Afternoon Session: Oct. 23rd 1:00 pm-3:00 pm
Link to register: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/rsji-summit-2018-awaken-the-lion-yogaday-1-pm-tickets-50930270811?aff=affiliate1

Diamond Body Gentle Yoga Day 2 (only 15 spots available per session):
Yoga classes centered on people of color.

Morning session: Oct. 24th 8:30 am-9:30 am
Link to register: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/rsji-summit-2018-diamond-body-gentle-yoga-day-2-am-tickets-50761050669?aff=affiliate1

Afternoon session: Oct. 24th 1:00 pm-3:00 pm
Link to register: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/rsji-summit-2018-diamond-body-gentle-yoga-day-2-pm-tickets-50761241239?aff=affiliate1

The Power of Eunioa: Internalized Racial Oppression (Only 40 spots available per session):
There will seperate workshops based on how you racially identify:

For People of Color: Oct. 23rd 9:45 am-4:30 pm
Link to register:https://www.eventbrite.com/e/rsji-summit-2018-internalized-racial-oppression-for-poc-tickets-50888195964?aff=original

For White Allies: Oct. 23rd 9:45 am-4:30 pm
Link to register: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/rsji-summit-2018-internalized-racial-oppression-for-white-allies-tickets-50890096649?aff=original

Change Teams Round Table: A Unified Approach to RSJI Across Seattle:
Armory Loft 3/4: Oct. 24th 1:00 pm-4:30 pm

Link to register: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/rsji-summit-2018-change-teams-round-table-day-2-tickets-50924006073?aff=original

Deadline for registration for the summit and all workshops is
Friday, October 19th, 2018.

Questions: Email iman.ibrahim@seattle.gov

addiction, addicts, black youth, bullying, burglary, capitol hill seattle, central district, cocaine, crime, crime prevention, drug overdose, drug use, drugs, drunk drivers, dui, FBI, Fentanyl, gun violence, heroin, homeless, mental health, Naloxone, narcan, Neighborhood Watch, nicklesville, opioid, overdose, paramedic, seattle police department, shelters, spd blotter, teens, victims, youth violence

Seattle Police Department: Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion (LEAD)

Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion (LEAD) is a pre-booking diversion pilot program developed with the community to address low-level drug and prostitution crimes in the Belltown neighborhood in Seattle and the Skyway area of unincorporated King County. The program allows law enforcement officers to redirect low-level offenders engaged in drug or prostitution activity to community-based services, instead of jail and prosecution. By diverting eligible individuals to services, LEAD is committed to improving public safety and public order, and reducing the criminal behavior of people who participate in the program.

About LEAD
Frequently Asked Questions
LEAD Policy Coordinating Group

Funders
Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion (LEAD) is a new innovative pilot program that was developed with the community to address low-level drug and prostitution crimes in the Belltown neighborhood in Seattle and the Skyway area of unincorporated King County. LEAD will divert low-level drug and prostitution offenders into community-based treatment and support services – including housing, healthcare, job training, treatment and mental health support — instead of processing them through traditional criminal justice system avenues.

A unique coalition of law enforcement agencies, public officials, and community groups collaborated to create this pilot program. These groups make up LEAD’s Policy Coordinating Group, which governs the program.

LEAD’s goal is to improve public safety and public order, and to reduce the criminal behavior of people who participate in the program. The program will be thoroughly evaluated to determine whether it has been successful or not.

Frequently Asked Questions

Below are frequently asked questions about LEAD. If you have further questions about the program, please contact us.

What is LEAD?

LEAD is a pre-booking diversion program that allows officers to redirect low-level offenders engaged in drugs or prostitution activity to community-based services instead of jail and prosecution. LEAD participants begin working immediately with case managers to access services. LEAD’s goals are to reduce the harm a drug offender causes him or herself, as well as the harm that the individual is causing the surrounding community. This public safety program has the potential to reduce recidivism rates for low-level offenders and preserve expensive criminal justice system resources for more serious or violent offenders.

How does LEAD differ from other drug programs?

First, LEAD is the result of a commitment from law enforcement agencies, public officials, and community organizations to work together in implementing a new approach to addressing drug and prostitution activity. Second, the diversion in LEAD is made at the pre-booking stage, in the hopes of bypassing the costs and time entailed in booking, charging, and requiring court appearances of an individual. Finally, LEAD provides participants with immediate case management services, and access to additional resources not available through existing public programs.

Who is eligible for diversion into LEAD?

Individuals who are arrested for eligible offenses within specified boundaries for Belltown or Skyway may be diverted into LEAD. Eligible offenses include low-level drug offenses, and engaging in prostitution. Individuals who have certain violent offenses in their criminal history are ineligible for diversion.

Who designed LEAD?

LEAD is the result of an unusual collaboration among diverse stakeholders. Collaborators include the King County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office, the Seattle City Attorney’s Office, the Seattle Police Department, the King County Sheriff’s Office, the King County Executive, the Mayor’s Office, The Washington State Department of Corrections, The Defender Association, the ACLU of Washington, and community members. The collaboration of these stakeholders was motivated by a shared dissatisfaction with the outcomes and costs of traditional drug law enforcement.

Who runs LEAD?

As noted, LEAD is the result of a collaboration among a number of stakeholders. All stakeholders are represented on LEAD’s Policy Coordinating Group, and the group makes decisions by consensus via a memorandum of understanding. LEAD is entirely voluntary, and any stakeholder may choose to withdraw from LEAD at any time.

Who will provide services to LEAD participants?

LEAD stakeholders have contracted with Evergreen Treatment Services (ETS) to provide services to LEAD participants. ETS has provided addiction treatment services in Washington for over 30 years, and has been actively involved in federally-funded research projects. ETS’ REACH Program has been a key provider in the delivery of street outreach services to chronically homeless and chemically addicted adults in Seattle for 15 years. ETS will follow harm reduction principles and will attempt to provide immediate access to services.

How will we know if LEAD works?

All LEAD stakeholders are committed to evaluating the program rigorously. The evaluation will consider, among other factors, whether LEAD has resulted in reductions in drug use and recidivism, whether LEAD is more cost-effective than traditional criminal justice processing, and whether LEAD has had a positive impact on a community’s quality of life.

How much will LEAD cost the City of Seattle and King County?

Nothing. LEAD stakeholders obtained funding from private foundations to implement the program. Its funders include the Ford Foundation, Open Society Foundations, Vital Projects Fund, RiverStyx Foundation, Massena Foundation, and the Social Justice Fund Northwest.

Do community members support LEAD?

Community members strongly support LEAD. LEAD will be piloted first in Belltown, and then in Skyway (in partnership with the King County Sheriff’s Office). Members of both communities have participated in the program’s design, and will continue to provide feedback about the program. For example, the LEAD Community Advisory Board in Belltown includes representatives from the Belltown Community Council, Belltown Business Association, Downtown Seattle Association/Metropolitan Improvement District, Recovery Café, YWCA, Plymouth Housing Group, and Millionair Club Charity. The LEAD Community Advisory Board in Skyway includes representatives from Skyway United Methodist Church, Westhill Community Council, and Skyway Solutions.

For how long will LEAD be implemented?

LEAD formally began on October 1, 2011. The program is anticipated to run for two years before an evaluation is begun, and to continue with foundation funding for an additional two years while the evaluation is conducted and analyzed. If LEAD is found to be effective, an ongoing source of funding will be sought.

Have programs like LEAD been implemented elsewhere?

LEAD was inspired by “arrest-referral” programs in the United Kingdom. Those programs have recently been implemented in virtually every police department in the United Kingdom because pilot projects proved to be so effective.

Policy Coordinating Group
LEAD is governed by a Policy Coordinating Group. The group makes decisions by consensus via a memorandum of understanding. LEAD is entirely voluntary, and any stakeholder may choose to withdraw from LEAD at any time. The members include:

Seattle Office of the Mayor
King County Executive Office
Seattle City Council
King County Council
Seattle City Attorney’s Office
King County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office
Seattle Police Department
King County Sheriff’s Office
Washington Department of Corrections
Belltown LEAD Community Advisory Board
Skyway LEAD Community Advisory Board
The Defender Association, Racial Disparity Project
ACLU of Washington, Drug Policy Project

Funders
LEAD is currently operating as a pilot program and is being funded by private foundations. It is hoped that LEAD will eventually find permanent funding from public sources. The cost-effectiveness of the program will be studied in detail as part of the evaluation for LEAD.

Current funders include:

Ford Foundation
Open Society Foundations
Vital Projects Fund
RiverStyx Foundation
Massena Foundation
The Social Justice Fund Northwest

Read more about LEAD

addiction, addicts, cocaine, cpr, crime, drug overdose, drug use, drugs, education, Fentanyl, health fair, heroin, homeless, housing, medic, medic one, mental health, mental illness, Naloxone, narcan, Neighborhood Watch, nicklesville, opioid, overdose, paramedic, seattle action network, sheriffs, spd, spd blotter, victims

UW Health Fair – Opioid Overdose Prevention Education & Naloxone Distribution

UW Health Fair – Opioid Overdose Prevention Education & Naloxone Distribution
May 22, 2018, 11am-3pm
UW Red Square, 4063 Spokane Ln, Seattle

DCHS and the Alcohol & Drug Abuse Institute/Center for Opioid Safety Education will provide information on opioid overdose prevention education, provide training to reverse overdose using Naloxone, and distribute 50 Naloxone nasal sprays to (Naloxone-trained) UW Health Fair participants.

(Supplies of Naloxone are limited, and have been provided through a grant awarded to King County DCHS through Adapt Pharma, to support community-based, opioid overdose prevention awareness events.)

Visit the Website

NARCAN Webiste

addiction, addicts, black youth, burglary, cocaine, crime, doj, drug overdose, drug use, drugs, drunk drivers, dui, education, FBI, Fentanyl, gun violence, guns, heroin, homeless, illegals, immigration, job fairs, jobs, king county sheriffs department, mental health, mental illness, Naloxone, narcan, nicklesville, Office of Professional Accountability, opioid, overdose, Pierce County Sheriff's Department, police reform, politics, seattle police department, sheriffs, spd, spd blotter, victims, youth violence

Prison Reform and Redemption Act 2018

LIVE: President Donald Trump Delivers Remarks At Prison Reform Summit – May 18, 2018 | CNBC

Summary: H.R.3356 — 115th Congress (2017-2018)All Information (Except Text)
There is one summary for H.R.3356. Bill summaries are authored by CRS.

Introduced in House (07/24/2017)
Prison Reform and Redemption Act

This bill directs the Department of Justice to develop the Post-Sentencing Risk and Needs Assessment System for use by the Bureau of Prisons (BOP) to assess prisoner recidivism risk; guide housing, grouping, and program assignments; and incentivize and reward participation in and completion of recidivism reduction programs and productive activities.

It amends the federal criminal code to:

require the BOP to implement the Post-Sentencing Risk and Needs Assessment System;
establish prerelease custody procedures for prisoners who, among other things, earn time credits for successfully completing recidivism reduction programs or productive activities;
prohibit, subject to specified exceptions, the use of restraints on federal prisoners who are pregnant or in postpartum recovery; and
broaden the duties of probation and pretrial services officers to include court-directed supervision of sex offenders conditionally released from civil commitment.
The BOP must:

incorporate de-escalation techniques into its training programs;
report on its ability to treat heroin and opioid abuse through medication-assisted treatment;
establish pilot programs on youth mentorship and service to abandoned, rescued, or vulnerable animals; and
designate a release preparation coordinator at each facility that houses prisoners.
The bill prohibits monitoring the contents of an electronic communication between a prisoner at a BOP facility and the prisoner’s attorney.

It amends the Second Chance Act of 2007 to reauthorize through FY2022 and modify eligibility criteria for an elderly offender early release pilot program.

Lieutenant Osvaldo Albarati Correctional Officer Self-Protection Act of 2017

The bill amends the federal criminal code to require the BOP to allow federal correctional officers to securely store and carry concealed firearms on BOP premises outside the security perimeter of a prison.

Read more HERE

Deputy Daniel McCartney, Pierce County Sheriff's Department, seattle police department, spd, tacoma

Public urged to line procession route for fallen Pierce Co. Sheriff’s Deputy

Public urged to line procession route for fallen Pierce Co. Sheriff’s Deputy

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TACOMA, Wash. – The public is urged to line the procession route on Wednesday as law enforcement escort the body of fallen Pierce County Sheriff’s Deputy Daniel McCartney to a memorial service at Pacific Lutheran University in Tacoma.

“Please come out – we can’t put into words how much it means to the family and to all of the first responders who will be participating in the memorial,” the Sheriff’s office wrote in a message on their Facebook Page.

The procession will begin around 11:00 a.m. at the North Gate of Joint Base Lewis-McChord.

The Sherrif’s office said the procession will then follow this route:

Leave Joint Base Lewis-McChord North Gate
East on 112th Street S.
South on Steele Street S.
East on Cross-Base Highway (State Route 704)
North on Pacific Avenue
West on Tule Lake Road S.
North on Yamika Avenue S.
West on 124th Street S.
Arrive at Pacific Lutheran University
The procession is set to arrive at PLU’s Olson Auditorium at 11:45 a.m.

The memorial is open to the public but parking won’t be available on site.

For those who would like to attend to attend, parking will be available at the Church of All Nations located at 111 112th Street E. in Tacoma. Shuttle service will leave the church and head the PLU campus starting at 11:15 a.m.

The memorial is set to begin at 1:00 p.m.

Govenor Jay Inslee has also ordered all state agencies to lower Washington state and U.S. flags to half-staff on Wednesday in honor of Deputy McCartney.

RELATED | New Pierce County Sheriff’s K9 named after fallen deputy Daniel McCartney

McCartney was shot and killed on Jan. 7 while investigating a home-invasion burglary in Frederickson. He is survived by a wife and three young sons.

A legacy fund that has been set up to help McCartney’s family. Donations can be made at any Tapco or TwinStar Credit Union or online through Tacoma/Pierce County Crime Stoppers.

Read more here

crime, gun violence, seattle police department, spd, spd blotter

Here’s how to send love and support to injured officer, family

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A Mount Vernon police officer shot in the head is in “very critical” condition, a Harborview spokesperson said at a Friday morning press conference.

The hospital says the officer, 61, was in surgery for at least a few hours. Read developing updates here.

Hospital officials did not release any updates on the officer’s current condition, but said that concerned community members can send messages of love and support to the injured officer and his family via the Harboview website. Click here to visit.

Type “Mount Vernon police officer” in the patient’s name field, Susan Gregg, Harborview spokeswoman, said.

You can also show your support in the comments below.

Mount Vernon Police Department Facebook Page

youth violence

Recent Violence in Seattle and outlining areas

We have had a recent series of violent gun-related incidents in Seattle over the past few years. However this year, as reported by the Seattle Police Department, there has been more violence involving possible guns.

This week, I have informed various organizations that I personally feel that the local ‘church’ organizations, community activists,etc should have their pastors, hot the streets daily and target youth one on one to end this violence immediately. Not tommorrow, not next week, not next month, today. Right now.

On Thursday a Madrona man named Justin Ferrari was killed, caught in a crossfire while preparing to go on a vacation with his wife. His parents, and children were in the car when he was fatally shot. Mr. Ferrari recently had worked at Seattle based Zillow as Sr. Software Developer.

Then over the weeked more violence was reported with several shootings, as well as a shooting at the Seattle ‘Folklife’ Festival.

And now yet more shootings..

I’m REQUESTING that the Seattle Police Department, local church leaders, as well as youth-violence organization leaders, whose CLAIMS are to end this violence, are on the STREETS, at events, monitor the streets, and ‘enforce and suppress’ any form of violence. I’m concerned it is their and our responsiblility to do just that, to the best of everyone’s ability.

As with Mr. Ferrari, other innocent victims have been hurt and/or killed. There is no need to continue with these shootings and killings.

Even with the DOJ investigating the SPD, who will be monitored as an end result I suspect, if these ‘youths’ are not approached and given better options, sooner or later regardless if the SPD know they are now being monitored, someone(youth) will put themselves in a situation and be shot/killed. This is not going to happen just once, this will happen multiple times.

Lets all get to work and stop this violence..
…because talk,…means nothing.

Ron Williams 310-270-6887