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Murray announces additional details on Income Inequality Symposium March 24, 2014

Also see the Ask the Mayor video from MARCH 25, 2014

Mayor Murray, Seattle University and Local Progress are presenting a one-day conference addressing income inequality and the role of the minimum wage in Seattle. The conference will be held on March 27 at Seattle University. It is free, open to the public, and will feature panelists and experts from around the country, as well as local experts and stakeholders.

The Symposium is a critical component of the Mayor’s efforts to address a cornerstone priority of his opportunity agenda: a meaningful increase in the compensation for Seattle workers. There are three primary goals for the Symposium:

Help inform ourselves of the rising income gap in our community and the complexities in addressing this issue,
Establish Seattle as a national leader in developing strategies to address income inequality, and
Serve as a model to catalyze a broader national movement to address the rising wealth gap in our country.

The Symposium is a part of the public engagement process being employed by the Income Inequality Advisory Committee which is charged with delivering to the Mayor a set of actionable recommendations to raising the minimum wage in Seattle by the end of April 2014.

What: Income Inequality Symposium

When: March 27, 2014, 8 a.m. – 4:15 p.m. Reception to follow

Where: Seattle University, Campion Ball Room, Reception to be held in the Student Center

Cost: Free, open the public and media (registration required). Refreshments provided. Lunch $5. Reception: no-host bar.

Web: http://www.iisymposiumseattle.com

At the Symposium, two studies commissioned by Income Inequality Advisory Committee will be presented. The studies, here and here, were conducted by Marieka Klawitter, Robert Plotnick, and Mark Long from the University of Washington’s Evans School of Public Affairs; and Ken Jacobs, Michael Reich, and Annette Bernhardt from the Institute for Research on Labor and Employment at the University of California, Berkeley.

“Increasing the minimum wage is one of the most important decisions I will make as Mayor, and this process involved gathering as much authoritative research and data as we could to inform this decision,” Murray said of the studies.

“We wanted to understand who the low-wage workers are in our community. The UW study tells us that women and people of color disproportionately represent Seattle’s low-wage workforce. It also tells us that raising the minimum wage could significantly reduce poverty in our community,” Murray said. “The Berkeley study helps us understand how minimum wage increases elsewhere impacted workers and businesses in their respective communities, as well as the lessons learned from those experiences. Their findings suggest that a thoughtful and balanced approach to increasing the minimum wage can meaningfully address income inequality, while maintaining a healthy and supportive environment for small businesses and non-profit organizations.”

Panelists and speakers include: Nick Hanauer; San Francisco Supervisor John Avalos; Philadelphia City Councilmember, Wilson Goode; Chicago Alders Roderick Sawyer, Toni Foulkes, and John Arena; Seattle Councilmembers Nick Licata, Bruce Harrell, and Kshama Sawant; Lori Pfingst, Center for Budget and Policy; Dorian Warren, Columbia University; Michael Reich and Ken Jacobs, UC Berkeley; Marieka Klawitter and Bob Plotnik, University of Washington; Jasmine Donovan, Dick’s; Saru Jayaman, ROCUnited; Dick Conway, Puget Sound Forecast; Maud Daudon, Greater Seattle Chamber of Commerce; Heather Boushey, Washington Center for Equitable Growth; Paul Sonn, National Employment Law Project, and other national and local experts, employers and stakeholders.

Campion Ballroom
Seattle University
914 E. Jefferson St.
Seattle, Washington 98122

day labor, employment, job, jobs, personal income, Work, workplace

The ‘Seattle Action Network’

When “Occupy SEATTLE” was given ‘orders’ to vacate the property at Seattle Central Community College recently, we also provide the help with the cleanup!!!!

(NOTE: To help you temporarily until we are setup, on the right side menu under the heading ‘Blogroll’ please click on ‘part time work’, or search ‘craigslist jobs’)

First of all I would like to thank all the good citizens of Seattle and eslewhere, who have bought our candy, soda, and water as a way of our raising funds for the Seattle Action Network Project!

How will The Seattle Action Network help you?

We are currently working to assemble a small staff of people who’s primary priority is to help the homeless find TEMPORARY DAY work. Any work. That is our primary goal, to help the homeless to become more productive in their lives. We will assist them with sending out emails for day jobs, and making phone calls to get those jobs.

We are here to help them be their productive best. We are here to help them secure a better future for themselves and/or their families.


Here is what The Seattle Job Network will offer you within the coming months:
We will have 24 hour access to employers who will hire you, even if part-time.

This website is in a startup stage, so please check back on a daily basis for updates.

Article from 2008 about Seattle’s Homeless: Seattle Battles The Homeless

day labor, employment, job, jobs, personal income, workplace

What is a “Job”?


A job is a regular activity performed in exchange for payment. A person usually begins a job by becoming an employee, volunteering, or starting a business. The duration of a job may range from an hour (in the case of odd jobs) to a lifetime (in the case of some judges). If a person is trained for a certain type of job, they may have a profession. The series of jobs a person holds in their life is their career…


Day Labor

Day laborers find work through three common routes.

First, some employment agencies specialize in very short-term contracts for manual labor most often in construction, factories, offices, and manufacturing. These companies usually have offices where workers can arrive and be assigned to a job on the spot, as they are available.

A manager looking for additional labor to fill an unexpected change in plans is presented with a problem of finding the needed quantity of labor with the right skills. Imagine the magnitude of the task of looking for workers, on the side of the street or by calling various employment agencies, who can verify they are journeyman asphalt rakers, typist, programmers, etc.

The benefit of representation is applied to both the labor and employer. Labor is given a source of recourse to achieve a safe work environment free of favoritism and arbitrary work assignments. Employers benefit from organized labor training programs, benefit plans, dispute resolution and a labor supply meeting most employers labor demand at most any time or place. The benefit of a labor supply arriving at a specified time and location within less than a days notice is reduced overhead resources.

Source: http://www.wikipidia.com