nra, School Safety

Interested in making your schools more secure?

Interested in making your schools more secure?

Help Bring NRA School Shield Security Assessor Training to Your Community!

OUR KIDS ARE OUR RESPONSIBILITY. IT’S NOT JUST OUR DUTY TO PROTECT THEM, IT’S OUR RIGHT TO PROTECT THEM.For more information and resources, visit: http://www.nraschoolshield.org

The training is provided by the NRA as part of the NRA School Shield program launched in an effort to better equip law enforcement, security personnel, and school systems in their pursuit of safer schools and communities.

The training will be conducted by certified NRA instructors who are current/former Law Enforcement Officers. The training is conducted in both a classroom and in the field at a local school campus and will focus on learning to detect threat potential and security weaknesses both day and night on and around a school campus.

To request more information about this free training, please contact: NRA School Shield at (844) 467-7723 or info@nraschoolshield.org

Read more NRA School Shield

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JOIN: Project Safe Neighborhoods

Project Safe Neighborhoods

Gun Violence Remains a Major Problem in the United States

According to the National Crime Victimization Survey, 467,321 persons were victims of a crime committed with a firearm in 2011. In the same year, data collected by the FBI show that firearms were used in 68 percent of murders, 41 percent of robbery offenses and 21 percent of aggravated assaults nationwide.[

People between the ages of 15 and 24 are most likely to be targeted by gun violence. From 1976 to 2005, 77 percent of homicide victims ages 15-17 died from gun-related injuries. This age group was most at risk for gun violence during this time period.

Teens and young adults are more likely than persons of other ages to be murdered with a gun. Most violent gun crime, especially homicide, occurs in cities and urban communities. More information is available on the Office of Justice Programs National Institute of Justice website.

Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN) is a nationwide commitment to reduce gun crime in America by networking existing local programs that target gun crime and providing those programs with additional tools to fit the specific gun crime problems in each area. The goal is to create safer neighborhoods by reducing gun violence and sustaining that reduction.

For further information on this District’s PSN effort please contact:

Assistant U.S. Attorney Erin Becker
PSN Coordinator
206-553-7970

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Department of Justice to Launch Inaugural National Heroin and Opioid Awareness Week

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Department of Justice to Launch Inaugural National Heroin and Opioid Awareness Week

Attorney General Lynch will Travel to Lexington, Kentucky as Part of the Justice Department’s Awareness Campaign to Address the Rising Public Health Crisis of Drug Addiction

The Obama Administration is announcing a “week of action” to raise awareness about the rising public health crisis caused by drug overdoses. As part of this effort, the Department of Justice designated the week of Sept.18-23, 2016, as National Heroin and Opioid Awareness Week. Senior Department of Justice officials, members of the President’s Cabinet and other federal agencies will hold events focused on the work being done to address the national prescription opioid and heroin epidemic.

Attorney General Loretta E. Lynch will travel to Lexington, Kentucky on TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2016, to hold a youth town hall at a local high school; meet with parents who have lost their children due to overdoses and now belong to the Heroin Education Action Team (H.E.A.T.); and deliver a policy speech regarding the actions and resources the Justice Department is bringing to bear on this issue.

“The heroin and opioid epidemic is one of the most urgent law enforcement and public health challenges facing our country,” said Attorney General Lynch. “Through National Heroin and Opioid Awareness Week, the Department of Justice seeks to raise awareness and prevent new victims from succumbing to addiction; to highlight the department’s ongoing commitment to holding accountable traffickers and others responsible for this epidemic; and to help provide treatment to those grappling with addiction. To be successful in this important endeavor, we need the help of all our federal, tribal, state and local partners. In the months ahead, we will continue working to erase this scourge from our communities and to ensure a brighter future for all Americans.”

Read more FULL REPORT

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Seattle Urban League ‘Career Bridge’ Program

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Please visit the Seattle Urban League Website

Career Bridge Overview

Career Bridge began in 2012, following a spate of gun violence and deaths in Seattle. Career Bridge was initially developed and piloted as a collaborative effort between the City of Seattle and community partners to address the disproportionate rates of violence and trauma research showed to be experienced by men of color, particularly African American men. Career Bridge was created to connect African-American men and other men of color who experience multiple barriers to employment, education and training with jobs, and other necessary support. Originally managed jointly by the City of Seattle’s Office of Economic Development and Human Services Department, Career Bridge was developed through an ongoing partnership with community sponsors and supporters (a network of formal and informal groups with strong ties and existing relationships within the community).

This innovative and community-driven model recognizes and builds on the strengths of existing community networks. Strong personal relationships, grassroots implementation and participant empowerment through shared leadership and accountability differentiate Career Bridge from other services provided to its target population. The Career Bridge Program model brings together workforce training, social services, as well as grassroots community support networks in order to provide a relevant and comprehensive approach to assist participants attain the abilities and skills needed to achieve short-term economic and personal stability. Using a cohort model, individuals enter and progress through Career Bridge as a group.

Participants benefit from the mutual motivation, encouragement and collaborative learning that occurs within a cohort model.

Participants’ peers also become an important part of their network of support.

Class description

Classes are 80 hours (classes times: 12:30pm – 4:30pm, Monday through Friday)
Participants will receive 6 college credits through South Seattle College and a student ID# upon completion for continuing education.
$75 stipends paid to each participant per week for attendance.
There will be 2 days in each curriculum set aside for Community partners.
Job development services offered to Career Bridge participants through multiple resources.
Increased computer lab days to strengthen resume, cover letter, and online job search.
Increased training at Monroe Correctional Facility including work with Work Force development in prisons.

We understand that the best solution to crime prevention is a job. Career Bridge is the answer.

Click here to apply and call for an appointment at (206) 461-3792 Ext 3036.

Current Class Schedule

Start date—August 31st through September 25th
Class times—12:30PM to 4:30PM; Monday through Friday.
Computer lab days: Sep 7, 10, and 18.
All other days to be conducted in the open class room.
Total students 10-12 per class.

Graduation date: Tuesday, Sept 29th (held at Damascus Baptist Church Lower Banquet Room)

Program Model

Community Sponsors and Supporters: A key element of Career Bridge is the expectation that participants are referred by people who are well acquainted with them and committed to ongoing mentoring, leadership development, and problem solving support throughout the process.

Wrap-Around Support: Career Bridge recognizes the importance of and therefore helps facilitate participant’s connection to resources to address basic needs (i.e. food, transportation, housing, etc.), wrap services (i.e. childcare, utility assistance, etc.) and unsolved trauma (i.e. healthy relationships, mental health, substance use/abuse, etc.).

Employment & Career Training & Assistance: Career Bridge incorporates assistance with job readiness, job search, training, and labor market information. The program model facilitates ongoing assistance with job placement and connections to training needed for good-paying jobs that provide a pathway to long-term careers.

Support The Urban League Today!

The Urban League of Metropolitan Seattle is a nonprofit recognized as tax-exempt under Section 501(c)(3) of the United States Internal Revenue Code. Your donation is tax-deductible for U.S. tax purposes under Section 170 of the Code.
Donate Now

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SEATTLE SUMMER YOUTH JOBS- AGES 14-24

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Seattle, WA – Today, the Seattle Human Services Department (HSD) announced that the application process for the 2015 Summer Youth Internship Program is now underway. The summer internship program is open to youth and young adults, ages 14-24 who live in Seattle.

“Working together with business leaders, community partners and the City, we will be building the most vigorous youth employment program Seattle has seen in decades,” said Mayor Ed Murray. “This program will help our most at-risk youth develop the skills necessary to compete in the 21st Century economy.”

“Youth summer employment has been shown to reduce poverty, increase school engagement, provide job experience, and reduce participation in risky behaviors and crime, said Catherine Lester, Acting HSD Director. “By investing in the summer jobs, the City is not only investing in the individual participants, but also their families, communities and the city as a whole.”

This year, through the Mayor Ed Murray’s Summer Youth at Work Initiative, the program will employ 2,000 youth and young adults this summer, double the number of jobs provided to youth last year. Eligible youth and young adults will receive paid work experience in positions at various city departments and at private sector placements based on their career interest.

Seattle youth and young adults interested in applying for summer jobs can complete the Online Applicant Information Form or pick one up at SYEP office located at 810 Third Avenue, 4th Floor, Suite 420, Seattle, WA 98104 between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. The SYEP Applicant Information Form must be completed and received online, mailed or dropped off by 5 p.m. Monday, April 13, 2015.

For students without computer access, computers are available at Seattle Public Libraries, Seattle Parks and Recreation community centers, Seattle public high schools, WorkSource Centers, and some community based organizations.

Private sector business and nonprofit organizations can participate in the Summer Youth at Work Initiative by providing a structured and supervised work environment for the summer. Interested businesses and organizations should contact Nancy Yamamoto at 206-684-8189 or Nancy.Yamamoto@seattle.gov for more information.

The Seattle Human Services Department is one of the largest contributors to Seattle’s safety net as it provides $99 million in funding through 522 contracts to nearly 200 agencies that support Seattle’s most vulnerable residents each year. The department works closely with its community partners, including other public and nonprofit funders and service providers, to understand current and emerging human service needs, and to create and invest in a comprehensive and integrated regional human services system.

For more information visit HSD’s Seattle Youth Employment Program webpage.

employment

Building Trust Between Communities and Local Police

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President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden meet with elected officials, community and faith leaders, and law enforcement officials to discuss how communities and law enforcement can work together to build trust to strengthen neighborhoods across the country. (Official White House Photo by Lawrence Jackson)

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Recent events in Ferguson, Missouri and around the country have grabbed the attention of the nation and the world, and have highlighted the importance of strong, collaborative relationships between local police and the communities that they protect.

Today, the Administration announced new steps we’re taking to strengthen the relationships between law enforcement agencies and the communities they are obligated to protect and serve, including:

Advancing the use of body worn cameras and promoting proven community policing initiatives
Creating a new task force to promote expansion of the community-oriented policing model, which encourages strong relationships between law enforcement and the communities that they serve as a proven method of fighting crime
Reforming how the federal government equips state and local law enforcement – particularly with military-style equipment

Get more details about these new actions below.
Increasing the use of body worn cameras, and improving community policing

The President has proposed a three-year, $263 million investment package that will:

Increase police officers’ use of body worn cameras
Expand training for law enforcement agencies (LEAs)
Add more resources for police department reform
Multiply the number of cities where the Department of Justice facilitates community and local LEA engagement

Part of the proposal is a new Body Worn Camera Partnership Program, which would provide a 50 percent match to states and localities that purchase body worn cameras and requisite storage. In fact, the proposed $75 million, three-year investment could help purchase 50,000 body worn cameras.

As noted in a recent report released by Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS) and the Police Executive Research Forum (PERF), evidence shows that body worn cameras help strengthen accountability and transparency, and that officers and civilians both act in a more positive manner when they’re aware that a camera is present.

Building public trust while keeping crime rates down

The President is planning to create a Task Force on 21st Century Policing, chaired by Philadelphia Police Commissioner Charles H. Ramsey, who also serves as President of the Major Cities Chiefs Police Association; and Laurie Robinson, professor at George Mason University and former Assistant Attorney General for DOJ’s Office of Justice Programs.

The task force – which will include law enforcement representatives and community leaders, among others – has a threefold purpose:

Build on the extensive research that’s being conducted by DOJ’s Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS)
Examine how to promote effective crime reduction while building public trust
Prepare a report and recommendations within 90 days of the task force’s creation

Reforming how the federal government equips local law enforcement

In August, the President ordered a review of federal funding and programs that help equip state and local law enforcement agencies (LEAs). Over the course of the review, the White House explored whether existing federal programs:

Provide LEAs with equipment that is appropriate for what their communities need
Ensure that LEAs have adequate policies in place for use of the equipment, and that their personnel are trained and certified on how to use this equipment
Encourage LEAs to employ practices and standards that prevent misuse or abuse of this equipment

The final report, released today, finds inconsistencies in how these federal programs are structured, implemented, and audited. The report also identifies four areas of further focus that could help ensure that these programs help maximize the safety and security of both police officers and their communities:

Local community engagement
Federal coordination and oversight
Training requirements
The community-policing model

In light of this review, President Obama is planning to issue an Executive Order directing relevant agencies to work together and with law enforcement and civil rights and civil liberties organizations to develop specific recommendations within four months.

Read more The White House

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The California Endowment: Youth Justice Policy Board

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For the California Endowment, Commonweal staffs a Youth Justice Policy Board (YJPB) of distinguished California professionals and experts in the youth justice field. The Policy Board conducts reviews of California youth justice issues, programs and policies and advises the Endowment on reform strategies.

The Policy Board has adopted two action plans:

Leadership: addresses the need for central state leadership for juvenile justice program and policy development. The focus is on building the capacity of the Board of State and Community Corrections (BSCC) as the state’s lead agency in this regard. This action plan is being implemented via a new Board of State and Community Corrections Juvenile Justice Standing Committee (JJSC Members List) on which eight members of the Youth Justice Policy Board now serve.

Juvenile justice data and performance measures: supporting upgrades of California’s outmoded juvenile justice data systems, with the objective of improving system performance measures and raising the level and quality of juvenile justice information available to stakeholders, policymakers and the public.

Health Happens Here: The Policy Board’s agenda is linked closely to the principles and objectives of the “Health Happens Here” policy framework of the Endowment, which includes these policy reform efforts:

School discipline: The Endowment has supported a collaborative effort to change school discipline policies that result in the needless suspension and expulsion of pupils who are predominantly youth of color. In 2012, this effort led to the adoption of a legislative package that revised suspension and expulsion procedures in California.

Trauma informed care: Traumatic events in children’s lives have an adverse impact on their personal, social and educational success. Endowment grantees have collaborated to disseminate research and to train justice and school personnel on trauma-informed and trauma-responsive approaches.

Equal justice: Under the Endowment’s Boys and Men of Color (BMOC) initiative (and more recently, the Sons and Brothers collaborative), grantee organizations are taking action to implement justice system and community safety reforms to reduce disproportionate incarceration and to support positive outcomes for justice-involved youth of color.

Read more FULL ARTICLE

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The California Wellness Foundation: Youth Violence Prevention

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Youth Prevention Chart

The California Wellness Foundation (TCWF) has been the state’s leading philanthropy tackling the problem of youth violence in California. Their Youth Violence Prevention Initiative, launched in 1993, advanced a public health model of reform addressing two main areas: reducing firearm injury and death, and increasing state resources for youth crime and violence prevention.

Commonweal has consistently promoted the TCWF priority of increasing state resources for crime and violence prevention. Commonweal has tracked state spending for youth crime and violence prevention programs since 1997 (see chart). Commonweal also played a lead role in the creation large state revenue streams supporting youth service programs, including the Schiff-Cardenas Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act (JJCPA) which has supplied more than $1.2 billion for these programs over the last 13 years.

TCWF grantees working on firearm reduction policy were successful as well—promoting new legislative controls on automatic weapons, augmenting rules on handgun safety and encouraging local ordinances to control firearm proliferation.

Though the TCWF initiative ended in 2003, the foundation has continued to provide core support grants to help organizations to sustain the policy and safety gains realized during the Initiative. As a grantee, Commonweal provides the following services:

Advising the foundation on program and policy development
Working with state and community leaders to improve supervision and re-entry programs and strategies for juvenile offenders returning to home communities
Producing detailed analyses (digests) of legislative bills pending in each session of the California legislature, including vote status, and periodic budget reports for advocates and stakeholders
Policy advocacy to support TCWF violence prevention objectives, though a well-developed network of contacts with state and local policy leaders.

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SPD Community Picnics

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COMMUNITY PROGRAMS FOR YOUTH: Juvenile Court Department of the King County Superior Court

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Community Programs

Community Service
Youth Workforce Development
School Engagement
Restitution Monitoring & Accountability

Mission: The Community Programs mission is to partner and provide direct service to enhance education, community service, employment and victim restitution opportunities for court-involved youth. This is accomplished through developing strong partnerships and leveraging community resources to serve over 400 high-risk youth offenders each year.

Since 1982, the Community Programs Unit has been the foundation for developing workforce and education partnerships through collaboration with the community and adding valued resources for at-risk youth.

The projects under Community Programs promote balanced and restorative justice by building youth competency, advancing youth connections with community, restoring harm they have caused, and providing developmental skills.

The outcomes of the interventions are measured by the impact they have on raising protective factors or assts that help the young person grow to be a responsible and productive adult.

Workforce Development

Community Programs helps court-involved youth gain the basic work training skills needed to enter the workforce.

The Vocation, Education, Service, Training (VEST) Program provides assessment, pre-employment skills training, community service, and paid work experience internships throughout King County. It is the foundation for leveraging additional resources to expand programming.
The Rainier Valley Youth Service Project provides educational programming, community service, and work training opportunities for court-involved youth in south Seattle.
The New Start Project partners with the King County Work Training Program, Highline School District, and the White Center community to provide alternative education and work training opportunities in southeast King County.
The Minority Business and Youth Alliance partners with women and minority-owned businesses to link court-involved youth with internships with small businesses in King County.
Green Pathways is a movement and county-wide partnership to engage at-risk and court-involved youth to promising careers in emerging green training and occupations.

School Engagement & Truancy Interventions

The program partners with school districts and other programs to provide drop-out intervention services and positive school engagement opportunities. It provides support for youth having school attendance problems in select school districts.

PathNet Drop-Out Intervention is a Systems Integration initiative to re-engage out-of-school court-involved youth with the most appropriate education and training programs to reach educational goals. The program provides one-stop youth assessment and placement at the Renton Youth Source Center, and serves 100 out-of-school youth per year.

Victim Restitution

This program monitors and enforces victim restitution obligations of youth no longer on supervision. Youth that are late with victim restitution payments are offered employment preparation skills through monthly workshops. The Community Programs Unit can provide youth with stipends for competency development, connection to workforce skills training, and opportunities to enter the workforce to meet their legal financial obligations.

The unit is developing a victim awareness program to instill an understanding of the impact of crime on individuals and the community. Community Programs collects over $90,000.00 in restitution each year

Our Success

Community Programs has made it possible for hundreds of court-involved youth to re-engage in school, enter vocational training, enter the workforce, provide meaningful community service, and pay back victim restitution.

Much of this success comes from partnerships with public and private sector businesses, youth service providers, and community support.

Youth who complete the variety of services in Community Programs walk away with an increased understanding of themselves and their community. They also gain valuable skills to assist in their development as productive adults.

Major Partners

King County Department of Community and Human Services
King County Work Training Program
Seattle King County Workforce Development Council
Puget Sound Educational Service District
King County Department of Adult and Juvenile Detention Work Crew
King County Office of Business Relations and Economic Development
Southeast Seattle Effective Development
Rainier Chamber of Commerce
Highline School District

How You Can Become Involved

Provide job shadowing, career exploration opportunity with your business. Youth observe and write a report on various occupations as they explore the worlds of work.
Provide a community service project. Provide a public work project giving youth an opportunity to improve their community.
Provide a work experience site. Youth can be paid by the program for up to 100 hours of real work experience in a public or private business.

For more information, contact:

Verne Rainey
Program Manager
King County Superior Court
206-205-9490
verne.rainey@kingcounty.gov