CPR Can Save Heroin And Opiate Overdoses

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Harold and James, visitors to Seattle started CPR on 2 unconscious people today in Seattle. They are praying 1 life has been saved. Read more here

Three overdose deaths near Aurora; Seattle Police Department warn of heroin being used.

Heroin overdoses killed three people in the Aurora corridor on Saturday, and police say officers are warning known Heroin users….Read more

From: http://www.courant.com/

Efforts are underway to provide Narcan (naloxone) to all first responders to save lives in cases of overdoses from heroin and other opiates. However, first responders are not usually the first ones to the patient — family members and friends are.Fortunately, Narcan is not the only way to revive an opiate overdose.

Opiate poisoning victims do not need an antidote so much as they need air. The heart and brain aren’t poisoned. They simply run out of oxygen. What is needed is to get the chest moving to get oxygen into the lungs. While not everyone carries Narcan, most of us have a mouth, a free hand and a pair of lungs. In this case, CPR can be lifesaving.

If you come across a narcotic overdose and don’t know CPR, you can still help. Remember, breathe first. Pinch the nose closed, lips to mouth, blow into the person’s mouth like you’re blowing up a balloon and watch the chest rise. Release and wait for the chest to fall. Repeat. Give six to 10 breaths until the lungs are oxygenated, then call 911. Return and resume breathing until help arrives.

Remember that Narcan is great, but CPR can’t wait.

Ron D’Angelo M.D., Manchester

Here’s how to send love and support to injured officer, family

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A Mount Vernon police officer shot in the head is in “very critical” condition, a Harborview spokesperson said at a Friday morning press conference.

The hospital says the officer, 61, was in surgery for at least a few hours. Read developing updates here.

Hospital officials did not release any updates on the officer’s current condition, but said that concerned community members can send messages of love and support to the injured officer and his family via the Harboview website. Click here to visit.

Type “Mount Vernon police officer” in the patient’s name field, Susan Gregg, Harborview spokeswoman, said.

You can also show your support in the comments below.

Mount Vernon Police Department Facebook Page

Seattle Severe Weather Shelter

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Seattle Severe Weather Shelter

Location: Seattle Center Fisher Pavilion, near 2nd & Thomas St. South of Key Arena
Dates open: Saturday night 10/15 & Sunday night 10/16
Time: 7pm to 7am
Capacity: 100 beds
Population: Co-Ed Shelter: 18+, no children
Contact for information: (206) 684-0231

King County Administration Building Shelter & 420 4th Ave Shelter – expanded capacity (50 additional spots in Admin Building)

Location: 500 & 420 4th Avenue Downtown Seattle (Between Jefferson and James) Line up for the shelter in front of the loading dock garage door at the corner of 4th and Jefferson.
Dates open (with expanded capacity): Thursday, 10/13 – Tuesday, 10/18, (Both Admin Shelter & 420 4th Ave open regularly every other night with 50 beds each)
Time: 7pm to 6am
Capacity: 100 beds in Admin, 50 beds at 420 4th Ave
Population: men (pets welcome at 420 shelter)

Seattle City Hall Shelter

Location: 600 4th Ave
Dates open (with expanded capacity): Thursday, 10/13 – Tuesday, 10/18, (Open regularly with 75 beds every other night)
Time: 7pm to 6am
Capacity: 81 beds
Population: men & women
Here are some on the Eastside, too:

Eastside Women’s Winter Shelter
*Note: This shelter is a winter shelter for Women opening for the first night on Saturday, 10/15 and remaining open through much of winter.

Location: Lakeside Christian Church, 701 1st Street, Kirkland, WA 98033
Dates open: Saturday night 10/15 – 1/2/2017
Time: 8:30pm – 7am, 7 days/week
Population: Single Adult Women
Note: Includes Dinner & Breakfast
Contact for information: Cynthia: (425) 463-6285 x 106

Eastside Family Winter Shelter
*Note: This shelter is a winter shelter for families opening for the first night on Saturday, 10/15 and remaining open through much of winter.

Location: Redmond United Methodist Church, 16540 NE 80th St, Redmond, WA 98052
Dates open: Saturday night 10/15 – open all winter
Time: 8:30pm – 7am, 7 days/week
Population: Families
Note: Includes Dinner & Breakfast
Contact for information: Cynthia: (206) 437-7448
In Snoqualmie:

Valley Renewal Center Shelter (Expanding day center to be 24 hour shelter)

Location: 38625 SE River St, Snoqualmie, WA, 98065
Dates open: Friday 10/13 – Monday, 10/17 at 2pm
Time: 24-hour overnight, Dinner and Breakfast Served
Eligibility: Must have a Snoqualmie Valley Connection, Sex offender check, no background check
Population: Single Men; Single Parent Families Headed by Fathers or Mothers; Single Women; Two Parent Families
Contact for information: (425) 505 – 0038

Volunteer with Inmates and Detainees

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Dedicated. Compassionate. Committed.

Volunteers are selfless individuals who are inspired to make a difference and change lives. And we’re proud to say that many such volunteers have found a home, serving inmates and detainees within our facilities, mending the broken-spirited, and giving hope to those who just needed someone to believe in them.

At CCA, we believe in the value of volunteers who give of their time to benefit inmates and detainees and to serve the interests of their communities, religious organizations, or other non-profit organizations. We seek to provide volunteers with opportunities to fulfill their charitable missions and work to the benefit of inmates and detainees. These volunteers are encouraged to apply to enter our facilities, with the understanding that they are serving not on CCA’s behalf – but on behalf of the men and women who are incarcerated.

CCA is a correctional system with nearly 70 prisons, jails, detention centers and residential reentry centers across the country. We operate safe and secure correctional facilities that protect our communities, provide thousands of jobs, and serve as place for growth and renewal for the inmates in our care.

Read more FULL REPORT

LESSONS FROM WORLD WAR II: ENDURING LEGACIES OF JAPANESE AMERICAN INCARCERATION

LESSONS FROM WORLD WAR II: ENDURING LEGACIES OF JAPANESE AMERICAN INCARCERATION Sunday, October 23, 2016, 12:30 – 1:30 p.m.

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Event type Author Readings/Lectures
Where Central Library
Room Location Level 1 – Microsoft Auditorium
Audience Adults
Language English

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Summary A panel of scholars in Japanese American history discusses racial profiling during World War II and current racialized politics. Presented in partnership with Densho.

Description It’s been nearly 75 years since 120,000 people of Japanese heritage were imprisoned as a result of racist wartime hysteria. It took decades for the U.S. Government to acknowledge their wrongdoing and Americans are still coming to terms with this black mark on our nation’s history. In this panel, three leading scholars of Japanese American history will discuss the circumstances that lead to incarceration and its bearing on current events, including racial profiling of American Muslims and the racialized politics on display in the current election cycle.

Panelists:

Karen M. Inouye is the author of “The Long Afterlife of Nikkei Wartime Incarceration” (Stanford University Press, October 2016). She is Assistant Professor of American Studies at Indiana University, Bloomington.

Greg Robinson is professor of history at Université du Québec À Montréal. He is the author of “The Great Unknown: Japanese American Sketches” (University Press of Colorado, September 2016) as well as author and editor of several notable books on Japanese Americans, including “A Tragedy of Democracy,” which was awarded the history book prize of the Association for Asian American Studies; “After Camp,” winner of the Caroline Bancroft History Prize in Western US History, and “By Order of the President.”

Lon Kurashige is the author of “Two Faces of Exclusion: The Untold History of Anti-Asian Racism in the United States” (University of North Carolina Press, September 2016). He is associate professor of history at the University of Southern California.

The panel will be moderated by Brian Niiya, Densho Content Director, who edits the Densho Encyclopedia and is the author of the “Encyclopedia of Japanese American History.”

Densho’s mission is to preserve the testimonies of Japanese Americans who were unjustly incarcerated during World War II before their memories are extinguished. They offer these irreplaceable firsthand accounts, coupled with historical images and teacher resources, to explore principles of democracy and promote equal justice for all. Densho is a Japanese term meaning “to pass on to the next generation,” or to leave a legacy.

Notes Library events and programs are free and everyone is welcome. Registration is not required. Parking is available in the Central Library garage for the weekend rate of $7.

This event is supported by The Seattle Public Library Foundation, author series sponsor Gary Kunis, and media sponsor The Seattle Times and presented in partnership with Densho. Books will be available for purchase from Elliott Bay Book Co. at the event.

Recorded for Podcast This event will be recorded for future podcast.

Contact Info *Central Library 206-386-4636 or Ask a Librarian
Room Capacity Space is limited at library events. Please come early to make sure you get a seat. Due to the fire code, we can’t exceed the maximum capacity for our rooms.

Read more MORE INFORMATION

Work Source: Basic Computer Skills October 7, 2016

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This workshop goes over the basics of computer hardware, basic keyboard and mouse skills, using Microsoft Word and using the Internet for job search.

Limited space is available.
* This workshop provides job search credit for individuals claiming Unemployment Insurance benefits.

Fri., Oct. 7, 9:30am – 12pm

WorkSource Affiliate Rainier
2531 Rainier Ave. S
Seattle, WA 98144