URGE KING COUNTY TO FOLLOW THE OPIATE TASK FORCE RECOMMENDATIONS


The opiate epidemic in King County is growing. The King County Opiate Addiction Task Force has recommended a new comprehensive strategy to fight this crisis, including the opening of two pilot safe consumption spaces. In these facilities, healthcare professionals can prevent overdose deaths, reduce the spread of diseases like HIV and Hepatitis C, and efficiently refer people struggling with addiction to treatment. Tell the King County Council to support this safe, effective, and scientifically proven method of responding to the opiate epidemic.

URGE KING COUNTY TO FOLLOW THE OPIATE TASK FORCE RECOMMENDATIONS

Please visit THIS LINK

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SPD Officers Use Naloxone, CPR to Revive man

Published on May 23, 2017
Police responded to a report of a man down in the 1500 block of 9th Avenue just before midnight and were quickly flagged down by a woman. The woman pointed officers to a man lying on the sidewalk, and said he had recently used heroin.

Officer Jared Levitt and Sergeant Dave Hockett saw the 40-year-old man was struggling to breathe and gave him a dose of nasal naloxone and began CPR a short time later.

SFD medics arrived and took over treatment of the man, who regained consciousness and was taken to Harborview Medical Center for treatment.

This incident marks the 16th time officers have used Naloxone since Seattle police began carrying it in mid-March. The case will become part of the ongoing study conducted by the University of Washington into SPD’s use of Naloxone for a possible department-wide deployment.

As a reminder, Washington law provides immunity from criminal drug possession charges for anyone seeking medical aid for themselves or someone else experiencing an overdose.

See the Video

Officer Performs CPR on Man Overdosing, Saves Life

Officer Performs CPR on Man Overdosing, Saves Life
Written by Detective Mark Jamieson on April 20, 2017 11:24 am

Just before 2:00 am Thursday morning officers responded to a report of a man overdosing in an abandoned house in the 1000 block of E. Republican Street. Officer Do located a woman inside the house, calling for medics and screaming that someone was dying. Officer Do entered the house and located an unconscious man lying on the floor. The man was not breathing and did not have a detectable pulse. Officer Do immediately began CPR on the man and continued until he regained consciousness. Seattle Fire personnel arrived and provided the man with additional medical aid. The 37-year-old man was treated at the scene and later transported to the hospital for further evaluation.

As a reminder, Washington law provides immunity from criminal drug possession charges for anyone seeking medical aid for themselves or someone else experiencing an overdose.

Read more SPD Website

SAVE A LIFE: WITH THIS APP – ‘PULSEPOINT’

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DOWNLOAD THE PULSEPOINT APP NOW

You know the difference early CPR and defibrillation can make in a Sudden Cardiac Arrest event. Fifty-seven percent of U.S. adults say they’ve had CPR training, and most would be willing to use CPR or an AED to help save a stranger’s life. Yet only 11% say they’ve used CPR in an actual emergency—that’s a number we can increase together.

When that emergency call comes in your team will be ready. But what if someone was already at the scene, applying lifesaving CPR and defibrillation until the EMS team arrived? With PulsePoint, your dispatch system immediately alerts CPR-trained bystanders about a nearby SCA event through the free PulsePoint Respond mobile app, and lets them know the location of the closest AED.

When CPR-trained bystanders receive an alert from PulsePoint Respond, it tells them not only where an SCA event is happening, but also where they can find the nearest AED. But often, data on AED locations can be missing, inaccurate, or simply not detailed enough to make the devices easy to find in an emergency. That’s where the PulsePoint AED app comes in.

With the free PulsePoint AED app, citizens can help even before a life is in danger, by easily identifying public access AEDs throughout your community. Users place the AED location on a map, add business and descriptor information and submit photos of the AED in context of its environment.

PulsePoint

Seattle Fire Department Medic II Program: CPR and choking techniques

SFD

Medic Two Program

The Seattle Fire Department’s Medic II Program provides training classes in Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) and choking techniques.

The training program is recognized as an international role model, which attracts people from around the world, who come to Seattle to learn more about how to implement their own CPR training programs.

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Since Medic II was initiated in 1971, over 858,000 Seattle/King County residents have been trained and retrained in the lifesaving technique of CPR. Studies have shown that prompt bystander CPR more than doubles a patient’s chances of becoming a long-term survivor.

Classes are conducted by firefighters and community partners who teach on their own time and are compensated out of a donated budget. They train 10-12,000 Seattle/King County residents annually.

Medic II – CPR offers five kinds of classes:

Adult CPR class
Adult Renewal
Pediatric (Infant/Child) CPR class
AED/CPR class for groups that have purchased an AED (Automated External Defibrillator).
ESL/CPR class, which has a specially developed curriculum to meet the needs of ESL (English as a Second Language) students and the limited and non-English speaking populations.
The program was funded, in part, by United Way through the end of 2006. It is a donation-based organization which relies upon public support for its survival. Every dollar that is received goes directly into the training classes and not into staffing, overhead, office supplies, furniture or office equipment. However, over the years, our funding has been substantially reduced while our expenses have significantly increased.

This is where you can help us to keep moving forward with our vital mission. You may donate to the program in one of the following ways:

Medic Two Program

While taking one of the above classes.
Using the Fire Department’s secure, Online Donation Form (scroll down the form to the “Medic 2” section).
Mailing your tax deductible contribution. Please make your check out to Medic II – CPR and mail to:
Medic II – CPR
Seattle Fire Department
301 2nd Ave. S.
Seattle, WA 98104-2680

For CPR class information, please contact the
Medic II – CPR Office at (206) 684-7274