addiction, addicts, capitol hill seattle, central district, college students, homeless, housing, hunger, mental health, mental illness, nicklesville, seattle action network, seattle police department, winter food banks, winter shelters

Seattle Winter Shelter Dec 22 thru Jan 2018

The City of Seattle


Winter Response

SEVERE WEATHER SHELTER

Seattle Center Exhibition Hall
301 Mercer Street
Seattle, WA 98109
Enter at 7:00 p.m.

Friday Night, December 22nd through
Monday Night January 1st
Exit at 7:00 a.m.

The Severe Weather Shelter serves adults 18 and older
(all genders) and is operated by Salvation Army staff.

Open access, referral forms are NOT required.
Bus Routes Include #3, and Rapid Ride D Line
Weekday Information – 206-684-0231

See more Information

Advertisements
addiction, addicts, aids, bruce harrell, central district, children, cpr, drug use, drugs, Fentanyl, health fair, heroin, hiv, homeless, homeless children, mental health, mental illness, overdose, seattle action network, Seattle Indian Health Board, teens, veterans

FREE Dental, Vision and Medical Care October 26-29, 2017 Key Arena

Seattle/King County Clinic brings together healthcare organizations, civic agencies, non-profits, private businesses and volunteers from across the State of Washington to produce a giant free health clinic in KeyArena at Seattle Center. The four-day volunteer-driven clinic provides a full range of free dental, vision and medical care to underserved and vulnerable populations in the region. The next Clinic is scheduled for October 26 – 29, 2017.

2014 – 2016 Achievements:

11,900 patients
Over $10 million in direct services
9,800+ volunteers
120,000+ volunteer hours

amazon, amazon job fair, apprenticeships, college students, computer skills, day labor, employment, hiring, job, job fairs, jobs, seattle action network, starbucks, summer jobs, summer work, technology, teens, Work, workforce, workplace

Hundreds flock to Amazon jobs fair in Kent

Susmita Diyali from Tukwila answers questions in a tent, waiting with others to go inside Amazon’s fulfillment center in Kent to apply for a job Wednesday. (Ellen M. Banner/The Seattle Times)

By Ángel González
Seattle Times business reporter
Amazon.com is looking to hire some 50,000 good women and men to pick, stow and pack items in its U.S. warehouses.

About 1,200 of those mostly permanent jobs are in Washington state. So on Wednesday — a day that the e-commerce giant declared “Amazon Jobs Day” — job applicants lined up by the hundreds at the company’s gargantuan, robot-filled Kent warehouse with the hopes of landing a position in one of the Amazon facilities in the Puget Sound area.

amazon, amazon job fair, apprenticeships, capitol hill seattle, central district, college students, computer skills, day labor, employment, hiring, internerships, job, job fairs, jobs, seattle action network, summer jobs, summer work, technology, teens, Work, workforce, workplace

KENT: Amazon Jobs Day Wed August 2, 2017

Jonathan Vanian
Jul 26, 2017

Amazon is going on a hiring spree.

The online retail giant said Wednesday that it plans to hire 50,000 workers as part of a jobs fair it calls Amazon Jobs Day.

On August 2, Amazon (AMZN, -1.02%) said it would invite interested job candidates to ten of its various fulfillment centers across the U.S. From 8 a.m. to noon on that day, Amazon staff will show prospective employees tours of their warehousing facilities, perform interviews, and “make thousands of on-the-spot job offers to qualified candidates,” according to the announcement.

Get Data Sheet, Fortune’s technology newsletter.
Amazon vice president of worldwide operations and human resources John Olsen said in a statement that the jobs would offer “highly-competitive wages” and benefits.

“These are great opportunities with runway for advancement,” Olsen said. “In fact, of our entry level managers across Amazon’s U.S. fulfillment centers, nearly 15% started in hourly roles and were promoted into their current positions.”

Prospective job candidates can expect these fulfillment center roles to involve a lot of picking, packing, and shipping of the various goods Amazon distributes each day throughout the U.S.

Of the 50,000 open position, Amazon said over 10,000 will be part-time jobs.
Here’s a list of the cities Amazon will host its jobs fair: Baltimore, Md.; Chattanooga, Tenn.; Etna, Ohio.; Fall River, Mass.; Hebron, Ky.; Kenosha, Wis.; Kent, Wash.; Robbinsville, N.J.; Romeoville, Ill.; Whitestown, Ind.; Buffalo, N.Y. (part-time work only); Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, Okla. (part-time work only).
Amazon’s big jobs push seems to follow up on an earlier announcement Amazon made in January when it said it plans to hire 100,000 full-time employees by the middle of 2018. Besides warehouse workers, Amazon also wants to hire software engineers, data scientists, and customer service workers.If Amazon were to hire 100,000 workers by 2018, it would employ over 280,000 U.S. employees.

See the Video

capitol hill seattle, central district, day labor, employment, hiring, internerships, job, job fairs, jobs, seattle action network, seattle naacp, seattle urban league, summer jobs, summer work, technology, veterans, wmbe, women of color, Work, workforce, workplace

BLS REVIEW: EMPLOYMENT AND UNEMPLOYMENT AMONG YOUTH — SUMMER 2016

Employment and Unemployment Among Youth Summary
For release 10:00 a.m. (EDT) Wednesday, August 17, 2016 USDL-16-1687

Technical information: (202) 691-6378 * cpsinfo@bls.gov * http://www.bls.gov/cps
Media contact: (202) 691-5902 * PressOffice@bls.gov

EMPLOYMENT AND UNEMPLOYMENT AMONG YOUTH — SUMMER 2016

From April to July 2016, the number of employed youth 16 to 24 years old increased by
1.9 million to 20.5 million, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. This
year, 53.2 percent of young people were employed in July, little changed from a year
earlier. (The month of July typically is the summertime peak in youth employment.)
Unemployment among youth rose by 611,000 from April to July 2016, compared with an
increase of 654,000 for the same period in 2015. (Because this analysis focuses on the
seasonal changes in youth employment and unemployment that occur each spring and summer,
the data are not seasonally adjusted.)

Labor Force

The youth labor force–16- to 24-year-olds working or actively looking for work–grows
sharply between April and July each year. During these months, large numbers of high
school and college students search for or take summer jobs, and many graduates enter
the labor market to look for or begin permanent employment. This summer, the youth
labor force grew by 2.6 million, or 12.4 percent, to a total of 23.1 million in July.
(See table 1.)

The labor force participation rate for all youth was 60.1 percent in July, little
changed from a year earlier. (The labor force participation rate is the proportion
of the civilian noninstitutional population that is working or looking and available
for work.) (See table 2.) The summer labor force participation rate of youth has held
fairly steady since July 2010, after trending downward for the prior two decades. The
summer youth labor force participation rate peaked at 77.5 percent in July 1989.

The July 2016 labor force participation rate for 16- to 24-year-old men was 62.4
percent, higher than the rate for young women at 57.7 percent. The rates for men and
women were little changed from last July. Whites had the highest youth labor force
participation rate in July 2016 at 62.7 percent. The rate was 53.8 percent for Blacks,
43.1 percent for Asians, and 56.2 percent for Hispanics. The rate for Blacks declined
by 2.6 percentage points from last July, while the rates for Whites, Asians, and
Hispanics showed little or no change.

Employment

In July 2016, there were 20.5 million employed 16- to 24-year-olds, little changed
from the summer before. Between April and July 2016, the number of employed youth
rose by 1.9 million. The employment-population ratio for youth in July 2016–the
proportion of the 16- to 24-year-old civilian noninstitutional population with a
job–was 53.2 percent, little changed from the year before. (See tables 1 and 2.)

The July 2016 employment-population ratios for young men (54.9 percent), women (51.5
percent), Whites (56.5 percent), Blacks (42.7 percent), Asians (38.8 percent), and
Hispanics (49.8 percent) showed little or no change from last July.

In July 2016, the largest percentage of employed youth worked in the leisure and
hospitality industry (25 percent), which includes food services. An additional 18
percent of employed youth worked in the retail trade industry, and 13 percent worked
in education and health services. (See table 3.)

Unemployment

The youth unemployment rate (11.5 percent) and the number of unemployed youth (2.6
million) in July 2016 were little changed from a year earlier. Of those 2.6 million
unemployed 16- to 24-year-olds, 1.9 million were looking for full-time work in July
2016, down 222,000 from July 2015. (See tables 1 and 2.)

The July 2016 unemployment rates for young men (12.0 percent), women (10.8 percent),
Whites (9.9 percent), Blacks (20.6 percent), Asians (10.0 percent), and Hispanics
(11.3 percent) also showed little or no change from last July. (See table 2.)

EMPLOYMENT AND UNEMPLOYMENT AMONG YOUTH — SUMMER 2016

day labor, education, employment, hiring, internerships, job, job fairs, jobs, seattle action network, seattle public library, summer jobs, summer work, technology, teens, wmbe, Work, workforce, workplace

Port Jobs: Annie E. Casey Foundation Grants $6 Million!

Annie E. Casey Foundation Grants $6 Million!

Port Jobs has been awarded workforce pathway funding as part of the $6 million Annie E. Casey Foundation Generation Work Initiative.

The initiative’s focus is to identify effective ways to connect low-income young adults ages 18-29 with training opportunities and jobs within the maritime, construction and advanced manufacturing industries. The ultimate goal is to develop reproducable programs which help unemployed young people build careers and develop skills that employers need.

“These young adults are facing some of the greatest obstables to living wage careers,” says Heather Worthley, Executive Director of Port Jobs. “This is an exciting opportunity for Port Jobs to join SkillUp Washington partners in creating pathways connecting employers with the next generation of skilled workers.”

Read more PORT JOBS

doj, education, king county sheriffs department, Office of Professional Accountability, police reform, seattle action network, seattle police department, spd, spd blotter

The Seattle Police Department’s Strategies for the Future

Plan Overview
The Seattle Police Department has achieved remarkable progress in the eyes of our federal and local government officials, the people of Seattle, and the women and men of the Department. This work began when Mayor Murray took office, and during the past two years has been guided by SPD’s four pillars of policing – Enhance Public Trust, Build Pride and Professionalism, Address Crime and Disorder, and Promote Best Business Practices.

These four principles form the foundation of the Department’s priorities for the next two years, and beyond, outlined in this strategic plan. These objectives are the result of the combined efforts of SPD leadership to develop long term goals to support the delivery of police services in a manner that reflects the values, needs, and expectations of entire City of Seattle.Public trust remains paramount, both in terms of achieving complete compliance with the settlement agreement and maintaining a singular focus on community engagement. As we look toward the next two years, the institutionalization of new modes and measures of supervision and oversight, allow the Department to refocus its efforts on the responsibilities of every day policing – answering calls for assistance.

Download the FULL PDF

Read more FULL PLAN

addiction, addicts, burglary, drug use, drugs, heroin, homeless, prowlers, seattle action network, seattle police department, spd, spd blotter, victims

Seattle Police Department: Preventing Prowlers PSA

Preventing Prowlers PSA

It only takes a minute for an experienced thief to prowl your vehicle. Learn how you can deter thieves from targeting your neighborhood, parking garage and vehicle at http://www.seattle.gov/preventcarprowls

capitol hill seattle, central district, computer skills, day labor, employment, hiring, internerships, job, job fairs, jobs, seattle action network, summer jobs, summer work, technology, wmbe, women of color, Work, workforce, workplace

SeaTac: Register for Airport University Classes!

Register for Airport University Classes!

Do you work at Sea-Tac Airport? Take college classes at the airport!

Airport University classes start April 3rd! Register today!

We partner with Highline College and South Seattle College to offer classes in Computer Skills, Customer Service, Security, and Workplace Safety. Classes are FREE for income-eligible students.
See flyer for REGISTRATION information and class details.

Read more Classes

addicts, bruce harrell, homeless, hunger, jobs, kshama sawant, mental health, mental illness, news, seattle action network, Seattle Indian Health Board, sexual assault, shelters, teens, victims, winter shelters, women of color, workforce

Catholic Community Services Emergency Assistance Program

The Emergency Assistance program helps families, single adults, seniors, and people with disabilities with a variety of emergency and basic needs. Services include:

Rental Assistance and Eviction Prevention
Move-in Assistance
Utility Assistance and Shut-off Prevention
Information & Resource Referral
Short-term Case Management
Emergency Motel Vouchers (families with children under 18 only)
Food Bags and Cards (based on availability)
Bus Tickets (based on availability)
To access services please call the intake line for your geographic area for updated
information and eligibility.

Seattle and South King County:

Seattle and South King County
(253) 850-2523

East King County
(425) 213-1963 x2

Volunteer

1-888-649-6850

Visit the WEBSITE