SPD Officers Use Naloxone, CPR to Revive man

Published on May 23, 2017
Police responded to a report of a man down in the 1500 block of 9th Avenue just before midnight and were quickly flagged down by a woman. The woman pointed officers to a man lying on the sidewalk, and said he had recently used heroin.

Officer Jared Levitt and Sergeant Dave Hockett saw the 40-year-old man was struggling to breathe and gave him a dose of nasal naloxone and began CPR a short time later.

SFD medics arrived and took over treatment of the man, who regained consciousness and was taken to Harborview Medical Center for treatment.

This incident marks the 16th time officers have used Naloxone since Seattle police began carrying it in mid-March. The case will become part of the ongoing study conducted by the University of Washington into SPD’s use of Naloxone for a possible department-wide deployment.

As a reminder, Washington law provides immunity from criminal drug possession charges for anyone seeking medical aid for themselves or someone else experiencing an overdose.

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How the SBA Helps Veterans

Three Business Resources for Veterans

May is Military Appreciation Month. Each year, the SBA serves over 200,000 veterans, service-disabled veterans and military spouses across the United States and at military installations around the globe.

To veterans: You served our country, now let the SBA serve you. The following are three ways the SBA serves veterans:

1. Boots to Business is a two-step entrepreneurial program offered by the SBA on military installations around the world as a training track of the Department of Defense (DOD) Transition Assistance Program (TAP).

2. Boots to Business: Reboot extends the entrepreneurship training offered in TAP on military installations to veterans of all eras and their spouses.

3. Veteran Business Outreach Center (VBOC) provides entrepreneurial development services such as business training, counseling and mentoring for eligible veterans owning or considering starting a small business.

Mon May 15, May 16 Lake Washington Hyatt Regency Job Fair

Hyatt Regency Job Fair

YOU can play a part in HYATT hospitality! Hyatt Regency Lake Washington will host two job fairs. Come visit us on Monday, May 15th or Tuesday, May 16th from 8am to 6pm.

The event takes place at the Renton Pavilion Event Center, adjacent to the Piazza and the Renton Transit Center

Positions are posted on line at http://www.hyatt.jobs and search: Renton, WA

Join us at the Renton Pavilion computers available to apply

We are hiring for:

Culinary
Housekeeping
Food and Beverage
Rooms
Engineering
Banquets
Events
Purchasing

We are Equal Opportunity Employer if you have questions please email marci.flores@hyatt.com.

Visit WorkSource website

BLS REVIEW: EMPLOYMENT AND UNEMPLOYMENT AMONG YOUTH — SUMMER 2016

Employment and Unemployment Among Youth Summary
For release 10:00 a.m. (EDT) Wednesday, August 17, 2016 USDL-16-1687

Technical information: (202) 691-6378 * cpsinfo@bls.gov * http://www.bls.gov/cps
Media contact: (202) 691-5902 * PressOffice@bls.gov

EMPLOYMENT AND UNEMPLOYMENT AMONG YOUTH — SUMMER 2016

From April to July 2016, the number of employed youth 16 to 24 years old increased by
1.9 million to 20.5 million, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. This
year, 53.2 percent of young people were employed in July, little changed from a year
earlier. (The month of July typically is the summertime peak in youth employment.)
Unemployment among youth rose by 611,000 from April to July 2016, compared with an
increase of 654,000 for the same period in 2015. (Because this analysis focuses on the
seasonal changes in youth employment and unemployment that occur each spring and summer,
the data are not seasonally adjusted.)

Labor Force

The youth labor force–16- to 24-year-olds working or actively looking for work–grows
sharply between April and July each year. During these months, large numbers of high
school and college students search for or take summer jobs, and many graduates enter
the labor market to look for or begin permanent employment. This summer, the youth
labor force grew by 2.6 million, or 12.4 percent, to a total of 23.1 million in July.
(See table 1.)

The labor force participation rate for all youth was 60.1 percent in July, little
changed from a year earlier. (The labor force participation rate is the proportion
of the civilian noninstitutional population that is working or looking and available
for work.) (See table 2.) The summer labor force participation rate of youth has held
fairly steady since July 2010, after trending downward for the prior two decades. The
summer youth labor force participation rate peaked at 77.5 percent in July 1989.

The July 2016 labor force participation rate for 16- to 24-year-old men was 62.4
percent, higher than the rate for young women at 57.7 percent. The rates for men and
women were little changed from last July. Whites had the highest youth labor force
participation rate in July 2016 at 62.7 percent. The rate was 53.8 percent for Blacks,
43.1 percent for Asians, and 56.2 percent for Hispanics. The rate for Blacks declined
by 2.6 percentage points from last July, while the rates for Whites, Asians, and
Hispanics showed little or no change.

Employment

In July 2016, there were 20.5 million employed 16- to 24-year-olds, little changed
from the summer before. Between April and July 2016, the number of employed youth
rose by 1.9 million. The employment-population ratio for youth in July 2016–the
proportion of the 16- to 24-year-old civilian noninstitutional population with a
job–was 53.2 percent, little changed from the year before. (See tables 1 and 2.)

The July 2016 employment-population ratios for young men (54.9 percent), women (51.5
percent), Whites (56.5 percent), Blacks (42.7 percent), Asians (38.8 percent), and
Hispanics (49.8 percent) showed little or no change from last July.

In July 2016, the largest percentage of employed youth worked in the leisure and
hospitality industry (25 percent), which includes food services. An additional 18
percent of employed youth worked in the retail trade industry, and 13 percent worked
in education and health services. (See table 3.)

Unemployment

The youth unemployment rate (11.5 percent) and the number of unemployed youth (2.6
million) in July 2016 were little changed from a year earlier. Of those 2.6 million
unemployed 16- to 24-year-olds, 1.9 million were looking for full-time work in July
2016, down 222,000 from July 2015. (See tables 1 and 2.)

The July 2016 unemployment rates for young men (12.0 percent), women (10.8 percent),
Whites (9.9 percent), Blacks (20.6 percent), Asians (10.0 percent), and Hispanics
(11.3 percent) also showed little or no change from last July. (See table 2.)

EMPLOYMENT AND UNEMPLOYMENT AMONG YOUTH — SUMMER 2016

Jobs: Sea-Tac International Airport

Making jobs at Sea-Tac International Airport easier to get and great employees easier to find.

Located in the main terminal of Seattle-Tacoma International Airport, Airport Jobs is the primary recruiting tool for many Seattle-Tacoma International Airport-related employers, and the principal resource for people seeking employment there. Airport Jobs is a program of Port Jobs and is sponsored by the Port of Seattle.

Airport Jobs helps job seekers:

understand what it takes to work at the airport,
learn about current job openings at Sea-Tac Airport,
complete employment applications,
create resumes and cover letters,
learn job search and interviewing techniques, and
obtain referrals to community resources.

For employers, Airport Jobs offers a centralized location to list job openings, start up or expand operations, use our offices for interviewing, and reduce advertising expenditures for job applicants. Let us help you find the right people for the job!

Read more SeaTac Jobs