Officials: Call 2-1-1 to help people find shelter from cold and ice

Severe Weather Winter Shelters List Here

Outreach teams from King County and the City of Seattle are on patrol around downtown and parts of Capitol Hill to help people on the streets get out of the cold. You can help by dialing 2-1-1.

The King County Emergency Services Patrol, funded by the county and the city, is “operating 24/7 during the weekend to help people who are living on the streets in downtown Seattle” and “out meeting with people who are experiencing homelessness to encourage them to come inside during the winter storm.”

But you can also help out by calling 2-1-1 to let the outreach teams know about somebody who may need help.

You can also call 9-1-1 but reports from some callers say that the emergency dispatchers haven’t treated the shelter shuttle calls as priorities.

The county and the city have increased available shelters and warming facilities through the recent storms and into next week. A roster of severe weather shelters is here.

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WINTER SHELTER: Seattle Center’s Exhibition Hall

Homeless man dies of exposure at Seattle light-rail station

Officials and homeless-service providers have been working to try to ensure the survival of thousands of people living unsheltered in King County with a snowstorm expected to hit the region. That’s meant opening shelters and paying for hotel rooms for those who need help.

Seattle planned to keep its emergency overnight shelter at Seattle Center’s Exhibition Hall open through at least Sunday night.

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In a Radical Departure, United Way Shows Philanthropy Isn’t Pretty


Campaign shows ‘problems nobody talks about at cocktail parties’

United Way raises more than $4.7 billion every year for improving health, education and stability in communities around the globe, and until now, its marketing focused on the aftermath and uplifting side to its good work, often featuring smiling volunteers in “Live United” t-shirts. But the nonprofit is taking a drastic turn to prompt more people to take action: its latest PSA shows what these communities look like before United Way steps in to help.

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