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Two-Part Mental Health First Aid Training Workshop

Two-Part Mental Health First Aid Training Workshop

Event date: Monday, Aug 12, 2019 –
9:30 am to 3:00 pm

Location: NewHolly
Address: New Holly Gathering Hall
7054 32nd Ave S
Seattle, WA

Attendees welcome:
All tenants – SHA housing residents and Housing Choice Voucher holders
Attendee Age: Adult – Age 18 and older

Description:
Trainers from Valley Cities Mental Health will teach attendees to identify and understand common signs of mental illness and substance abuse. They will also coach how to interact with a person in crisis and how to connect them with trained professionals who can help them through this difficult time.

The two-part workshop will take place on Monday, August 12th and Wednesday, August 14th from 9:30am to 3:00pm. You must attend both days.

Training is free for SHA residents and lunch is provided both days.

Contact Ellen Ziontz at (206) 239-1625, eziontz@seattlehousing.org or Dean McBee at (206) 491-7830, deanmcbee1@gmail.com to reserve your spot.

Supporting programs: Valley Cities Mental Health

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Seattle Firefighters Need Your Help!


Seattle Fire Foundation, community support help firefighters get new bulletproof vests

SEATTLE — Seattle firefighters need more bulletproof vests because of growing dangers on the job. The department has gotten a few, but still needed more than 200 vests and there’s no more money from the city to pay for them.

But, with help from the Seattle Fire Foundation, more than $55,000 has been raised in community and corporate donations.

“With that, we will immediately be purchasing 40 sets of ballistic gear to help protect our firefighters,” said Lindsey Pflugrath, the chair of Seattle Fire Foundation.

The Seattle Fire Department says each bulletproof vest, along with accessories, costs about $1,300. The city supplied the department 25 of them at $1,300 each, coming out to $32,500.

But, the department wants a total of 250 of them. The total bill would be about $325,000. Many of them will have to be paid for with the help of community donations.

“We have 215 firefighters on duty every day,” said Chief Harold Scoggins with Seattle Fire Department.

Firefighters are doing more than putting out fires.

Seattle Fire Department Facebook

SFD CPR Training (Medic II)

The Seattle Fire Department provides training classes in Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) and choking techniques.

Since the CPR Program (Medic II) started in 1971, more than 850,000 Seattle and King County residents have been trained and retrained in the lifesaving technique of CPR. Studies have shown that prompt bystander CPR more than doubles a patient’s chances of becoming a long-term survivor.

Medic II Program
Phone:(206) 684-7274
Email:medic2@seattle.gov

Read more KOMO

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BEWARE: Fentanyl overdose deaths up 70 percent in Wash., health officials say

Photo from Public Health Seattle & King County shows pills containing fentanyl that were sold on the streets of Seattle.

OLYMPIA, Wash. – The number of people who died from an overdose of illicit fentanyl increased nearly 70 percent this year over last in Washington state, health officials said Wednesday.


NARCAN SPRAY

Read more HERE

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Public libraries and YMCAs to get Narcan to prevent opioid overdoses


Narcan, that drug meant to help prevent an opioid overdose, is becoming more readily available.

Seattle police carry it. It’s available at CVS and Walgreens without a prescription. And now, it’s going to be available at thousands of public libraries and YMCAs nationwide.

drugs addicts in south tel aviv

Every day, 115 people in the U.S. die because of opioid overdoses.

Read more <HERE

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October 15, 2018 – Seattle Neighborhood Business District Safety Forum

OCT 15 Seattle Neighborhood Business District Safety Forum
by SODO BIA
Free

Actions and Detail Panel

REGISTER

drugs addicts in south tel aviv

Event Information

DESCRIPTION
The BIAs of Ballard, Chinatown/International District, University District, Pioneer Square, and SODO are collaborating in our efforts to engage with city, county, and state officials to address the increasing challenges our businesses are experiencing with drug dealers/users, public disorder, threatening behaviors and crime toward our customers and employees.

We want to invite you to attend a constructive conversation with our elected officials about the problems and solutions to our public safety concerns.

Questions? Email us at: info@sodoseattle.org

Agenda:

1. Facilitator Introductions – 5 minutes

2. BIA Panel Presentation – 40 minutes

What BIAs are doing
Crime Stats
Business, employee, and customer concerns
BIA request for action
3. City, County, State responses – 40 minutes

Enforcement
Prosecution
Services
4. Public Comment – 30 minutes

5. Conclusion and Next Steps – 10 minutes

REGISTER

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Center for Children & Youth Justice: Uniting partners to redirect gang-involved youth

Learn About: Center for Children & Youth Justice

Youth Leadership, Intervention & Change (LINC) program

What Their Doing:

LINC 2018 Community Assessment Update: Presentation | Full Document

Strengthening agency coordination to reduce youth gang involvement. CCYJ has brought together schools, law enforcement, policymakers, social service providers, and other organizations to collect uniform data and develop an innovative, coordinated approach to address gang/group-involvement countywide.

Connecting gang/group-involved youth and young adults to needed support. Through a coordinated team of providers, LINC is intervening with these young people and reengaging them in secondary education, connecting them to counselling and treatment services,
employment opportunities, and other services they need to succeed. The multidisciplinary team model helps youth and young adults set and reach their educational, employment, and pro-social goals. CCYJ currently facilitates three multidisciplinary teams serving seven King County school districts. In 2017, we expanded into Seattle ensuring LINC is available as a resource throughout King County.

LINC Team Intervention Manual

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JOIN: Project Safe Neighborhoods

Project Safe Neighborhoods

Gun Violence Remains a Major Problem in the United States

According to the National Crime Victimization Survey, 467,321 persons were victims of a crime committed with a firearm in 2011. In the same year, data collected by the FBI show that firearms were used in 68 percent of murders, 41 percent of robbery offenses and 21 percent of aggravated assaults nationwide.[

People between the ages of 15 and 24 are most likely to be targeted by gun violence. From 1976 to 2005, 77 percent of homicide victims ages 15-17 died from gun-related injuries. This age group was most at risk for gun violence during this time period.

Teens and young adults are more likely than persons of other ages to be murdered with a gun. Most violent gun crime, especially homicide, occurs in cities and urban communities. More information is available on the Office of Justice Programs National Institute of Justice website.

Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN) is a nationwide commitment to reduce gun crime in America by networking existing local programs that target gun crime and providing those programs with additional tools to fit the specific gun crime problems in each area. The goal is to create safer neighborhoods by reducing gun violence and sustaining that reduction.

For further information on this District’s PSN effort please contact:

Assistant U.S. Attorney Erin Becker
PSN Coordinator
206-553-7970

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Prison Reform and Redemption Act 2018

LIVE: President Donald Trump Delivers Remarks At Prison Reform Summit – May 18, 2018 | CNBC

Summary: H.R.3356 — 115th Congress (2017-2018)All Information (Except Text)
There is one summary for H.R.3356. Bill summaries are authored by CRS.

Introduced in House (07/24/2017)
Prison Reform and Redemption Act

This bill directs the Department of Justice to develop the Post-Sentencing Risk and Needs Assessment System for use by the Bureau of Prisons (BOP) to assess prisoner recidivism risk; guide housing, grouping, and program assignments; and incentivize and reward participation in and completion of recidivism reduction programs and productive activities.

It amends the federal criminal code to:

require the BOP to implement the Post-Sentencing Risk and Needs Assessment System;
establish prerelease custody procedures for prisoners who, among other things, earn time credits for successfully completing recidivism reduction programs or productive activities;
prohibit, subject to specified exceptions, the use of restraints on federal prisoners who are pregnant or in postpartum recovery; and
broaden the duties of probation and pretrial services officers to include court-directed supervision of sex offenders conditionally released from civil commitment.
The BOP must:

incorporate de-escalation techniques into its training programs;
report on its ability to treat heroin and opioid abuse through medication-assisted treatment;
establish pilot programs on youth mentorship and service to abandoned, rescued, or vulnerable animals; and
designate a release preparation coordinator at each facility that houses prisoners.
The bill prohibits monitoring the contents of an electronic communication between a prisoner at a BOP facility and the prisoner’s attorney.

It amends the Second Chance Act of 2007 to reauthorize through FY2022 and modify eligibility criteria for an elderly offender early release pilot program.

Lieutenant Osvaldo Albarati Correctional Officer Self-Protection Act of 2017

The bill amends the federal criminal code to require the BOP to allow federal correctional officers to securely store and carry concealed firearms on BOP premises outside the security perimeter of a prison.

Read more HERE

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Meth, the Forgotten Killer, Is Back. And It’s Everywhere

PORTLAND, Ore. — They huddled against the biting wind, pacing from one corner to another hoping to score heroin or pills. But a different drug was far more likely to be on offer outside the train station downtown, where homeless drug users live in tents pitched on the sidewalk.

“Everybody has meth around here — everybody,” said Sean, a 27-year-old heroin user who hangs out downtown and gave only his first name. “It’s the easiest to find.”

The scourge of crystal meth, with its exploding labs and ruinous effect on teeth and skin, has been all but forgotten amid national concern over the opioid crisis. But 12 years after Congress took aggressive action to curtail it, meth has returned with a vengeance.

Visit The New York Times Website

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Volunteer with Inmates and Detainees

inmate-womens-group

Dedicated. Compassionate. Committed.

Volunteers are selfless individuals who are inspired to make a difference and change lives. And we’re proud to say that many such volunteers have found a home, serving inmates and detainees within our facilities, mending the broken-spirited, and giving hope to those who just needed someone to believe in them.

At CCA, we believe in the value of volunteers who give of their time to benefit inmates and detainees and to serve the interests of their communities, religious organizations, or other non-profit organizations. We seek to provide volunteers with opportunities to fulfill their charitable missions and work to the benefit of inmates and detainees. These volunteers are encouraged to apply to enter our facilities, with the understanding that they are serving not on CCA’s behalf – but on behalf of the men and women who are incarcerated.

CCA is a correctional system with nearly 70 prisons, jails, detention centers and residential reentry centers across the country. We operate safe and secure correctional facilities that protect our communities, provide thousands of jobs, and serve as place for growth and renewal for the inmates in our care.

Read more FULL REPORT