Officials: Call 2-1-1 to help people find shelter from cold and ice

Severe Weather Winter Shelters List Here

Outreach teams from King County and the City of Seattle are on patrol around downtown and parts of Capitol Hill to help people on the streets get out of the cold. You can help by dialing 2-1-1.

The King County Emergency Services Patrol, funded by the county and the city, is “operating 24/7 during the weekend to help people who are living on the streets in downtown Seattle” and “out meeting with people who are experiencing homelessness to encourage them to come inside during the winter storm.”

But you can also help out by calling 2-1-1 to let the outreach teams know about somebody who may need help.

You can also call 9-1-1 but reports from some callers say that the emergency dispatchers haven’t treated the shelter shuttle calls as priorities.

The county and the city have increased available shelters and warming facilities through the recent storms and into next week. A roster of severe weather shelters is here.

Read more Capitol Hill Seattle Blog

Advertisements

WINTER SHELTER: Seattle Center’s Exhibition Hall

Homeless man dies of exposure at Seattle light-rail station

Officials and homeless-service providers have been working to try to ensure the survival of thousands of people living unsheltered in King County with a snowstorm expected to hit the region. That’s meant opening shelters and paying for hotel rooms for those who need help.

Seattle planned to keep its emergency overnight shelter at Seattle Center’s Exhibition Hall open through at least Sunday night.

Read more KOMO Website

BEWARE: Fentanyl overdose deaths up 70 percent in Wash., health officials say

Photo from Public Health Seattle & King County shows pills containing fentanyl that were sold on the streets of Seattle.

OLYMPIA, Wash. – The number of people who died from an overdose of illicit fentanyl increased nearly 70 percent this year over last in Washington state, health officials said Wednesday.


NARCAN SPRAY

Read more HERE

Public libraries and YMCAs to get Narcan to prevent opioid overdoses


Narcan, that drug meant to help prevent an opioid overdose, is becoming more readily available.

Seattle police carry it. It’s available at CVS and Walgreens without a prescription. And now, it’s going to be available at thousands of public libraries and YMCAs nationwide.

drugs addicts in south tel aviv

Every day, 115 people in the U.S. die because of opioid overdoses.

Read more <HERE

Seattle Office for Civil Rights at the 2018 RSJI Summit at Seattle Center

Deadline for registration for the summit and all workshops is
Friday, October 19th, 2018

DESCRIPTION

Please join the Seattle Office for Civil Rights at the 2018 RSJI Summit at Seattle Center for two days, October 23rd-24th, of in-depth workshops, art, and presentations about The State of Race and Justice in Seattle.

We will explore the history of RSJI in Seattle City government; offer resources for race and social justice work; discuss race, racism, and the struggle of our communities for racial equity; and acknowledge the historical harm of systemic and institutional racism.

The RSJI Summit will bring together city departments, community artists, educators, youth, organizers, friends, and faily in the spirit of collective organization and healing.

City of Seattle employees:

Please register via Cornerstone https://bit.ly/2OFZNA8

Please register for the following workshops:

Awaken the Lion Day 1 (Yoga, only 15 spots available per session):
Morning Session: Oct. 23rd 8:30 am-9:30 pm
Link to register:https://www.eventbrite.com/e/rsji-summit-2018-internalized-racial-oppression-for-poc-tickets-50888195964?aff=original

Afternoon Session: Oct. 23rd 1:00 pm-3:00 pm
Link to register: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/rsji-summit-2018-awaken-the-lion-yogaday-1-pm-tickets-50930270811?aff=affiliate1

Diamond Body Gentle Yoga Day 2 (only 15 spots available per session):
Yoga classes centered on people of color.

Morning session: Oct. 24th 8:30 am-9:30 am
Link to register: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/rsji-summit-2018-diamond-body-gentle-yoga-day-2-am-tickets-50761050669?aff=affiliate1

Afternoon session: Oct. 24th 1:00 pm-3:00 pm
Link to register: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/rsji-summit-2018-diamond-body-gentle-yoga-day-2-pm-tickets-50761241239?aff=affiliate1

The Power of Eunioa: Internalized Racial Oppression (Only 40 spots available per session):
There will seperate workshops based on how you racially identify:

For People of Color: Oct. 23rd 9:45 am-4:30 pm
Link to register:https://www.eventbrite.com/e/rsji-summit-2018-internalized-racial-oppression-for-poc-tickets-50888195964?aff=original

For White Allies: Oct. 23rd 9:45 am-4:30 pm
Link to register: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/rsji-summit-2018-internalized-racial-oppression-for-white-allies-tickets-50890096649?aff=original

Change Teams Round Table: A Unified Approach to RSJI Across Seattle:
Armory Loft 3/4: Oct. 24th 1:00 pm-4:30 pm

Link to register: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/rsji-summit-2018-change-teams-round-table-day-2-tickets-50924006073?aff=original

Deadline for registration for the summit and all workshops is
Friday, October 19th, 2018.

Questions: Email iman.ibrahim@seattle.gov

Center for Children & Youth Justice: Uniting partners to redirect gang-involved youth

Learn About: Center for Children & Youth Justice

Youth Leadership, Intervention & Change (LINC) program

What Their Doing:

LINC 2018 Community Assessment Update: Presentation | Full Document

Strengthening agency coordination to reduce youth gang involvement. CCYJ has brought together schools, law enforcement, policymakers, social service providers, and other organizations to collect uniform data and develop an innovative, coordinated approach to address gang/group-involvement countywide.

Connecting gang/group-involved youth and young adults to needed support. Through a coordinated team of providers, LINC is intervening with these young people and reengaging them in secondary education, connecting them to counselling and treatment services,
employment opportunities, and other services they need to succeed. The multidisciplinary team model helps youth and young adults set and reach their educational, employment, and pro-social goals. CCYJ currently facilitates three multidisciplinary teams serving seven King County school districts. In 2017, we expanded into Seattle ensuring LINC is available as a resource throughout King County.

LINC Team Intervention Manual

SPD: Back to School Youth Safety Tips: Metro, Sound Transit Safety & more..

Safety at School

Safety at school should be your number one priority.
Report all crimes and suspicious activities to school staff and police.
Always say no to things that make you uncomfortable.
If you see or receive information about a gun on school campus, get to safety and call 9-1-1 immediately.

Safety on Metro/Sound Transit Routes

Pay attention to your surroundings when walking to or from transit stops and on buses or trains.
Thieves on transit are on the lookout for cellphones, jewelry or other valuables.
If there is a problem on the bus or train, notify the driver and/or call 911.
Keep all personal belongings close by.
If you have concerns about safety at or near your stop, contact your driver or call 911.

Street Smarts

Know your transit routes.
If a person or group makes you feel uncomfortable, cross the street, walk in another direction, or ask other people you trust to walk with you.
Make eye contact with people around you carry yourself with confidence.

If you are Targeted in a Crime

If someone tries to grab you, make a scene. Scream, kick, fight . . . Depending on the situation, do what you feel is right to get away.
If someone demands your wallet or phone it’s always safer to hand it over than risk injury.
Seek help from a neighbor, business or bystander as quickly as you can and call 9-1-1.

REad more Seattle Police Department Website

JOIN: Project Safe Neighborhoods

Project Safe Neighborhoods

Gun Violence Remains a Major Problem in the United States

According to the National Crime Victimization Survey, 467,321 persons were victims of a crime committed with a firearm in 2011. In the same year, data collected by the FBI show that firearms were used in 68 percent of murders, 41 percent of robbery offenses and 21 percent of aggravated assaults nationwide.[

People between the ages of 15 and 24 are most likely to be targeted by gun violence. From 1976 to 2005, 77 percent of homicide victims ages 15-17 died from gun-related injuries. This age group was most at risk for gun violence during this time period.

Teens and young adults are more likely than persons of other ages to be murdered with a gun. Most violent gun crime, especially homicide, occurs in cities and urban communities. More information is available on the Office of Justice Programs National Institute of Justice website.

Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN) is a nationwide commitment to reduce gun crime in America by networking existing local programs that target gun crime and providing those programs with additional tools to fit the specific gun crime problems in each area. The goal is to create safer neighborhoods by reducing gun violence and sustaining that reduction.

For further information on this District’s PSN effort please contact:

Assistant U.S. Attorney Erin Becker
PSN Coordinator
206-553-7970

SHAME ON HOMELESS AND CITY COUNCIL: Armed guards watch over North Seattle cemetery after vandalism, homeless complaints

SEATTLE – For the first time, armed guards watched over the children placing flags at historic Jewish cemeteries in North Seattle Wednesday night.

Families said they were forced to bring in security because of ongoing complaints about homeless campers, vandalism and just on Tuesday, people having sex on the tombstones.

Every year for a more than a decade, children come to honor the sacrifice of fallen veterans just before Memorial Day, but this year there’s a first at the Bikur Cholim and historic Sephardic Jewish cemeteries—armed security guards. Former Israeli Defense Forces keeping a close eye on the children placing 200 flags on veteran’s graves ahead of the holiday.

Read more at KOMO

President Donald J. Trump’s Initiative to Stop Opioid Abuse and Reduce Drug Supply and Demand

President Donald J. Trump’s Initiative to Stop Opioid Abuse and Reduce Drug Supply and Demand

HEALTHCARE

We will work to strengthen vulnerable families and communities, and we will help to build and grow a stronger, healthier, and drug-free society.

President Donald J. Trump

ADDRESSING THE DRIVING FORCES OF THE OPIOID CRISIS: President Donald J. Trump’s Initiative to Stop Opioids Abuse and Reduce Drug Supply and Demand will confront the driving forces behind the opioid crisis.

President Trump’s Initiative to Stop Opioid Abuse will address factors fueling the opioid crisis, including over-prescription, illicit drug supplies, and insufficient access to evidence-based treatment, primary prevention, and recovery support services.

The President’s Opioid Initiative will:

Reduce drug demand through education, awareness, and preventing over-prescription.
Cut off the flow of illicit drugs across our borders and within communities.

Save lives now by expanding opportunities for proven treatments for opioid and other drug addictions.
REDUCE DEMAND AND OVER-PRESCRIPTION: President Trump’s Opioid Initiative will educate Americans about the dangers of opioid and other drug use and seek to curb over-prescription.

Launch a nationwide evidence-based campaign to raise public awareness about the dangers of prescription and illicit opioid use, as well as other drug use.

Support research and development efforts for innovative technologies and additional therapies designed to prevent addiction and decrease the use of opioids in pain management.

This will include supporting research and development for a vaccine to prevent opioid addiction and non-addictive pain management options.

Reduce the over-prescription of opioids which has the potential to lead Americans down a path to addiction or facilitate diversion to illicit use.

Implement a Safer Prescribing Plan to achieve the following objectives:

Cut nationwide opioid prescription fills by one-third within three years.

Ensure that 75 percent of opioid prescriptions reimbursed by Federal healthcare programs are issued using best practices within three years, and 95 percent within five years.

Ensure that at least half of all Federally-employed healthcare providers adopt best practices for opioid prescribing within two years, with all of them doing so within five years.

Leverage Federal funding opportunities related to opioids to ensure that States transition to a
nationally interoperable Prescription Drug Monitoring Program network.

CUT OFF THE SUPPLY OF ILLICIT DRUGS: President Trump’s Opioid Initiative will crack down on international and domestic illicit drug supply chains devastating American communities:

Keep dangerous drugs out of the United States.

Secure land borders, ports of entry, and water ways against illegal smuggling.
Require advance electronic data for 90 percent of all international mail shipments (with goods) and consignment shipments within three years, in order for the Department of Homeland Security to flag high-risk shipments.

Identify and inspect high-risk shipments leveraging advanced screening technologies and by using drug-detecting canines.

Test and identify suspicious substances in high-risk international packages to quickly detect and remove known and emerging illicit drugs before they can cause harm.
Engage with China and expand cooperation with Mexico to reduce supplies of heroin, other illicit opioids, and precursor chemicals.

Advance the Department of Justice (DOJ) Prescription Interdiction and Litigation (PIL) Task Force to fight the prescription opioid crisis. The PIL Task Force will:

Expand the DOJ Opioid Fraud and Abuse Detection Unit’s efforts to prosecute corrupt or criminally negligent doctors, pharmacies, and distributors.

Aggressively deploy appropriate criminal and civil actions to hold opioid manufacturers accountable for any unlawful practices.

Shut down illicit opioid sales conducted online and seize any related assets.
Scale up internet enforcement efforts under DOJ’s new Joint Criminal Opioid Darknet Enforcement (J-CODE) team.

Strengthen criminal penalties for dealing and trafficking in fentanyl and other opioids:
DOJ will seek the death penalty against drug traffickers, where appropriate under current law.
The President also calls on Congress to pass legislation that reduces the threshold amount of drugs needed to invoke mandatory minimum sentences for drug traffickers who knowingly distribute certain illicit opioids that are lethal in trace amounts.

HELP THOSE STRUGGLING WITH ADDICTION: President Trump’s Opioid Initiative will help those struggling with addiction through evidence-based treatment and recovery support services:

Work to ensure first responders are supplied with naloxone, a lifesaving medication used to reverse overdoses.

Leverage Federal funding opportunities to State and local jurisdictions to incentivize and improve nationwide overdose tracking systems that will help resources to be rapidly deployed to hard-hit areas.
Expand access to evidence-based addiction treatment in every State, particularly Medication-Assisted Treatment for opioid addiction.

Seek legislative changes to the law prohibiting Medicaid from reimbursing residential treatment at certain facilities with more than 16 beds.

In the meantime, continue approving State Medicaid demonstration projects that waive these barriers to inpatient treatment.

Provide on-demand, evidence-based addiction treatment to service members, veterans and their families eligible for healthcare through the Departments of Defense or Veterans Affairs.
Leverage opportunities in the criminal justice system to identify and treat offenders struggling with addiction.

Screen every Federal inmate for opioid addiction at intake.

For those who screen positive and are approved for placement in residential reentry centers, facilitate naltrexone treatment and access to treatment prior to and while at residential reentry centers and facilitate connection to community treatment services as needed.

Scale up support for State, Tribal, and local drug courts in order to provide offenders struggling with addiction access to evidence-based treatment as an alternative to or in conjunction with incarceration, or as a condition of supervised release.

Read more The White House