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JOIN: Project Safe Neighborhoods

Project Safe Neighborhoods

Gun Violence Remains a Major Problem in the United States

According to the National Crime Victimization Survey, 467,321 persons were victims of a crime committed with a firearm in 2011. In the same year, data collected by the FBI show that firearms were used in 68 percent of murders, 41 percent of robbery offenses and 21 percent of aggravated assaults nationwide.[

People between the ages of 15 and 24 are most likely to be targeted by gun violence. From 1976 to 2005, 77 percent of homicide victims ages 15-17 died from gun-related injuries. This age group was most at risk for gun violence during this time period.

Teens and young adults are more likely than persons of other ages to be murdered with a gun. Most violent gun crime, especially homicide, occurs in cities and urban communities. More information is available on the Office of Justice Programs National Institute of Justice website.

Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN) is a nationwide commitment to reduce gun crime in America by networking existing local programs that target gun crime and providing those programs with additional tools to fit the specific gun crime problems in each area. The goal is to create safer neighborhoods by reducing gun violence and sustaining that reduction.

For further information on this District’s PSN effort please contact:

Assistant U.S. Attorney Erin Becker
PSN Coordinator
206-553-7970

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Prison Reform and Redemption Act 2018

LIVE: President Donald Trump Delivers Remarks At Prison Reform Summit – May 18, 2018 | CNBC

Summary: H.R.3356 — 115th Congress (2017-2018)All Information (Except Text)
There is one summary for H.R.3356. Bill summaries are authored by CRS.

Introduced in House (07/24/2017)
Prison Reform and Redemption Act

This bill directs the Department of Justice to develop the Post-Sentencing Risk and Needs Assessment System for use by the Bureau of Prisons (BOP) to assess prisoner recidivism risk; guide housing, grouping, and program assignments; and incentivize and reward participation in and completion of recidivism reduction programs and productive activities.

It amends the federal criminal code to:

require the BOP to implement the Post-Sentencing Risk and Needs Assessment System;
establish prerelease custody procedures for prisoners who, among other things, earn time credits for successfully completing recidivism reduction programs or productive activities;
prohibit, subject to specified exceptions, the use of restraints on federal prisoners who are pregnant or in postpartum recovery; and
broaden the duties of probation and pretrial services officers to include court-directed supervision of sex offenders conditionally released from civil commitment.
The BOP must:

incorporate de-escalation techniques into its training programs;
report on its ability to treat heroin and opioid abuse through medication-assisted treatment;
establish pilot programs on youth mentorship and service to abandoned, rescued, or vulnerable animals; and
designate a release preparation coordinator at each facility that houses prisoners.
The bill prohibits monitoring the contents of an electronic communication between a prisoner at a BOP facility and the prisoner’s attorney.

It amends the Second Chance Act of 2007 to reauthorize through FY2022 and modify eligibility criteria for an elderly offender early release pilot program.

Lieutenant Osvaldo Albarati Correctional Officer Self-Protection Act of 2017

The bill amends the federal criminal code to require the BOP to allow federal correctional officers to securely store and carry concealed firearms on BOP premises outside the security perimeter of a prison.

Read more HERE

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2016 National Crime Victims’ Rights Week Resource Guide

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See the VIDEO

2016 NCVRW Theme Video: Serving Victims. Building Trust. Restoring Hope

Every year in April, OVC helps lead communities throughout the country in their annual observances of National Crime Victims’ Rights Week (NCVRW), which will be observed in 2016 on April 10–16. This year’s theme—Serving Victims. Building Trust. Restoring Hope.—underscores the importance of early intervention and victim services in establishing trust with victims, which in turn begins to restore their hope for healing and recovery.

This year’s NCVRW Resource Guide highlights how serving victims and building trust restores hope and strengthens communities. The Guide contains a vibrant array of theme artwork that is available for organizations to incorporate into their outreach materials. View the 2016 NCVRW sample proclamation to help inspire the community, raise awareness of victims’ rights, and address unmet needs.

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Can Ferguson Happen Here?

A forum held in SeaTac about the relationship between law enforcement and the community.

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MEET EAST PRECINCT CAPTAIN PIERRE DAVIS

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Pierre Davis

Captain Pierre Davis has over 29 years of service in the Seattle Police Department.

Davis has worked as a patrol officer, detective, first line supervisor and mid level manager in the West, South, Southwest and East Precincts, Narcotics, Gang Unit, Felony Fugitive Unit, Office of Professional Accountability, and Traffic Enforcement Unit. Most recently he served as the Operations Lieutenant in the Southwest Precinct.

His formal field of study was in Mechanical Engineering Technology, and he attended the West Point Leadership College, as well as Police Administrations Courses at the University of Washington.

“I am one of a great many officers that was recruited from the community from which I resided. I proudly come from a long list of friends and relatives whom have served the Seattle Police Department with pride and dedication.”

Meet the East Precinct’s new new captain, 29-year SPD vet Pierre Davis

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Davis mets community members from his precinct at last week’s EastPAC session. A big crowd showed to talk about the City of Seattle’s work to stop the renewal of the Waid’s nightclub liquor license (Images: CHS)

Newly promoted Captain Pierre Davis has been at the helm of the Seattle Police Department’s East Precinct for five weeks, meaning he’ll have to stick around just a couple weeks longer to outlast his predecessor. After Mike Edward’s short stint as Capitol Hill’s captain, Davis said he is settling into the job and getting ready for a the usual uptick in criminal activity as longer days and warmer temperatures approach.

“These things happen,” Davis said about the recent captain shuffles from inside his East Precinct office, as the sounds of a daily officers’ ping-pong match echoed in the background.

Read more FULL BIO

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Subscribe to Seattle Central Community College Campus Alerts

Subscribe to Alerts

About the Alert System

Seattle Community Colleges students and staff members can sign up to receive text message and email alerts in case of a campus emergency or unplanned closure. Log in using your College SID and PIN to designate a cell phone number (for text message alerts) or the email address you’d like to use to receive alerts. You may use more than one number or email address. Alerts to staff members will go to the college email by default, and others can be added. The Seattle Community Colleges Alerts system will make a best effort to send messages if there is an emergency that causes the campus to close unexpectedly or if there is an incident that may pose a safety concern for the community.

Your SID/PIN

If you are a student who doesn’t know your SID or PIN, please go to the campus link below:

Seattle Central Community College
http://seattlecentral.edu/sos/

North Seattle Community College
http://www.northseattle.edu/kiosk/sidpin.html

South Seattle Community College
http://southseattle.edu/services/sid.htm

Seattle Vocational Institute
Call Admissions at (206) 587-4950

If you are an employee who doesn’t know your SID or PIN, use the form at the right-hand side of the first page of the Intranet at http://www.insideseattlecolleges.com

Read more SCCC Alert Login

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McGinn proposes changes in the wake of fatal stabbing

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McGinn proposes changes in the wake of fatal stabbing

By Joel Moreno
Published: Sep 16, 2013 at 5:32 PM PDT Last Updated: Sep 16, 2013 at 6:15 PM PDT

SEATTLE — Seattle Mayor Mike McGinn is proposing extensive public safety changes in response to a deadly stabbing outside a Sounders game on Friday.

Investigators say Donnel Jackson killed Troy Wolff and injured his girlfriend, Kristin Ito, in the random knife attack.

Police say Jackson is schizophrenic, and on Monday McGinn said the city needs to do more to address mental illness.

As for Jackson, a judge decided to hold him on $2 million bail, saying his alleged crimes have rattled the community’s sense of safety. Jackson declined to go before the judge and let his attorney do the talking.

Assistant Seattle Police Chief Nick Metz joined McGinn to talk about changes they are proposing.

“This, to me, was an extremely shocking event,” Metz said.

Among other changes, McGinn said the police department needs more officers.

“We will be reporting to you later what this budget has in it in regards to police officers, and we will be making additional investments,” he said.

McGinn also plans to push state lawmakers to fund more treatment beds, so mentally ill patients can be evaluated and helped instead of left on the streets.

“In the city of Seattle we are not going to wait for Olympia,” McGinn said. “We will continue pushing them.”

Friday’s stabbing evokes memories of other incidents, including the murder of Seattle fire captain Stanley Stevenson in 1997 as his family left a Mariners game at the Kingdome. More recently, Seattle police gunned down a man with mental problems in Magnolia.

King County Prosecutor Dan Satterberg has long called for changes in the mental health system, saying what’s in place now doesn’t work.

“The street is no place to get better if you are mentally ill, and it’s a place where people get much much worse,” he said.

McGinn plans to convene a summit with the Downtown Seattle Association and others to talk about what can be done to identify and help mentally ill people who are on the streets and in crisis.

He said any solution is bound to cost more money, which could translate into new fees or taxes.

Ito remains at Harborview Medical Center, but her condition has been upgraded to satisfactory.

See the video

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Free DV advocacy training for volunteers (South King County)

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DAWN is offering free advocacy training to individuals willing to commit to one year of volunteer service.

Topics Covered: DV in Context, Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Basics, Advocacy Based Counseling, DV Movement Timeline, Safety Planning, Protective Orders, Criminal Law, Mental Health, Chemical Dependency, Trauma, Economic Justice, Abuse in Later Life, Family Law, Immigration, Religion, Self-Care, Confidentiality, Resources, Suicide, Trauma Stewardship, Interpretation, Tech Safety, Mandated Reporting, LGBTQ, Batterers Intervention Programs, Etc…

Training will take place Monday through Friday, June 17-26, 2013 from 9am-4pm in South King County.

Visit to apply!

For paying attendees:
DV101 (24 HRS) $200, DV201 (40 HRS) $375, INDIVIDUAL CLASSES $40

For questions, please contact Betsy Ann at (425) 656-4305 ext. 2849.

Submit your registration paperwork by mailing it to: DAWN, Attn: Betsy Ann, PO Box 88007, Tukwila, WA 98138, or by faxing it to (425) 656-4309.

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Capitol Hill: Local performer says no one helped when he was attacked, robbed

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From: www.komonews.com

SEATTLE — Members of a local community say it’s unacceptable that nobody stepped up to help when a man was attacked in broad daylight in a busy Capitol Hill intersection.

Local performer Robbie Turner was walking on the corner of Pine and Harvard Thursday afternoon when he said he was attacked.

“I was hit in the face before I even said hello,” Turner said.

Police say the attacker caught Turner off guard and punched him in the face.

In February, Turner actually hosted a self defense course after several people were attacked in Seattle. But all that training couldn’t protect him from a knife.

“He literally almost cut my throat,” Turner said.

On top of everything else, Turner said no one tried to help him as the attacker stole his phone and ran away. Shaken, Turner went to a nearby store and called police.

“It made me feel really alone. If something were to happen, no one would come to your aid,” Turner said. “The police officer told me I was the only call that came in.”

Police say witnesses either didn’t want to get involved or didn’t see what was happening.

“In situations like this we don’t want people to put themselves in harm’s way, but be a good witness and call 911,” said Renee Witt with the Seattle Police Department.

Turner hopes the next time someone sees an attack, they take action. In the meantime, he said people should learn self defense.

“So you know you’re safe, because at the end of the day the only person looking out for you is you,” he said.

Social Outreach Seattle is planning a May 22 Rally and march on Capitol Hill as a sign of solidarity and a sign that no one should feel alone in a dangerous situation.

See the video

employment

Connie Rice: Advancement Project – Leadership

Advancement Project

In her legal work, Connie has led multi-racial coalitions of lawyers and clients to win more than $10 billion in damages and policy changes, through traditional class action civil rights cases redressing police misconduct, race and sex discrimination and unfair public policy in transportation, probation and public housing.

She filed a landmark case on behalf of low-income bus riders that resulted in a mandate that more than 2 billion dollars be spent to improve the bus system. Together with Co-Directors Molly Munger and Steve English, Connie launched a coalition lawsuit, Godinez v. Davis, that won approximately $1 billion for new school construction in Los Angeles and other urban areas – money previously slated for less crowded, more affluent suburban school districts.

With these funds the Los Angeles Unified School District began its nationally recognized program to build over 66 new schools since 2001.

After the court in Godinez required California to develop a new system for funding schools construction, Advancement Project was instrumental in assessing the need for adequate schools to serve all children in California and in crafting and shepherding three school construction bond initiatives that raised $25 billion for new and renovated facilities throughout the state, including $5 billion earmarked to relieve overcrowding in urban schools. This funding enabled California to build or renovate over 1 million school spaces since 2000. Connie then chaired the Independent Prop. BB Citizens’ Bond Oversight Committee that monitored and evaluated how Los Angeles Unified School District used its allocation of school construction funds.

At the invitation of LAPD Chief William Bratton, Connie investigated the biggest police corruption scandal in Los Angeles history and obtained the commitment of the Chief to reform LAPD’s training and incentives system through an internal commission that she co-chairs. Connie also conducted a landmark 18-month assessment of the City of Los Angeles’ anti-gang programs and drew the blueprint to reduce gang violence through a regional, multi-jurisdictional comprehensive strategy to right the balance between suppression and prevention.

Prior to co-founding Advancement Project, Connie was Co-Director of the Los Angeles office of the NAACP Legal Defense & Educational Fund, an associate at the law firm of Morrison & Foerster; and a clerk to the Honorable Damon J. Keith, judge of the United States Court of Appeals, Sixth Circuit. Connie is a graduate of Harvard College and the New York University School of Law.

In 2006, Los Angeles Times West Magazine named Connie one of the 100 most powerful people in Southern California, and California Law Business twice been named her one of the top 10 most influential lawyers in California. Connie serves on the boards of the Public Policy Institute of California and public radio station KPCC.